Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code
W253
Entry requirements
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Why study this course?

This is a top-up version of our Interior Architecture and Design BA (Hons) degree. A top-up degree is the final year (Level 6) of an undergraduate degree course and is for those who have a foundation degree, Higher National Diploma or equivalent qualification, or those wishing to study the final year of their degree in London.

Interior architecture and design is a distinct, rigorous practice that requires a specialist way of thinking about how we occupy complex interior spaces. As a practice, it applies to buildings and urban communities and involves thinking about how interior elements and the materiality of spaces are brought together at a human scale to accommodate and delight.

Specifically, we open up opportunities and provide an atmosphere where students can become creative partners and gain insights about how it will be to practise as specialists in their field whilst actually encouraging multi-disciplinary design as a flexible, adaptable, and creatively rich route for delivering design projects.

Our interior design courses are ranked third in the UK in the Guardian University Guide 2023. We’re also second in the UK for teaching quality and fourth for course satisfaction.

You can find out more about what to expect on the course in this video presentation from our Head of Interiors.

We are fascinated by the way people inhabit existing and new spaces, both at the scale of the home and at the scale of the city. Interior architecture and design is a distinct, rigorous practice that requires a specialist way of thinking about how we occupy complex spaces and how the elements of space are brought together at a human scale both to accommodate and to delight.

You'll develop specialist skills in the areas of observational and spatial drawing, computer drawing, model making and technological and material investigations. Alongside making design proposals we ask you to comprehensively research, analyse and articulate the culture and context in which your design thinking is being applied.

As you progress through this course, you'll develop your own individual enquiry, creative approach, critical thinking and deepen your understanding of design processes. We encourage you to combine intellectual and creative ambition with detailed resolution of your work and to test how to communicate your ideas effectively to your peers and in the wider world.

Our teaching programme is supplemented by study trips, practice visits, design workshops and weekly lectures by designers and architects. Where possible, we link with The Projects Office, to other areas of the University and with our established international partners.

Follow @ldnmet_interiors on Instagram for the latest student work and news from the course!

Enrich your studies with extra-curricular activities

Our teaching programme is supplemented by study trips, practice visits, design workshops and weekly lectures by designers and architects

Course ranked third in the UK

Our interior design courses are ranked third in the UK in the Guardian University Guide 2023

Second in the UK for teaching quality

We’re second in the UK for teaching quality and fourth for course satisfaction in the Guardian University Guide 2023

Course modules

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2023/24 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 3 modules

Critical & Contextual Studies 3: Dissertation (Interiors)

This module currently runs:
autumn semester - Wednesday morning
autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

(core, 30 credits)

Critical and Contextual Studies (CCS) in Level 6 offers you an opportunity to understand and explore the historical, social, cultural and economic factors which influence, and provide a context for, the development of architecture, art and design practice. Building on critical and academic skills gained during two years of previous study, the module encourages you to develop an awareness of issues around which there is some debate, uncertainty or contest. Based on this awareness, you will develop a set of research questions which constitute the topic of your study. This topic can be theoretical, historical, or technical and you may, with guidance, decide to engage with an area of scholarly interest outside the territory of your degree course.

You will develop your topic and respond to your research questions in the form of an extended critical study or Dissertation (6,000–7,000 words). Through this study you demonstrate that you can thoroughly research a topic, use appropriate methods of investigation, and work in a methodical and organised way to develop a coherent argument or line of thought. Teaching and Learning on the module is designed to support you in this process through a combination of tutorials and one to one supervision; as well as a series of formative and summative assessments which prepare you for the final submission.

The final form and presentation of your Dissertation can reflect a broad range of approaches to research and writing. It may include visual materials or other non-written forms of presentation as long they support your enquiry and comprise an integral part of the whole. By prior approval at the start of the module, your research can be part practice-based, and include primary research and fieldwork.

The dissertation may, by prior approval at the start of the module from the Head of Subject, be part practice-based and can include fieldwork and primary research in its methods. Its form and approach can reflect a broad range of design-specific approaches based on discussion and agreement with your supervisor.

By virtue of the sustained, independent nature of the learning and substantial final output, the dissertation is also intended to prepare you for possible postgraduate study.

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Integrated Design Practice

This module currently runs:
spring semester - Friday

(core, 30 credits)

This module provides a link between the completion of your undergraduate studies, and professional interior design practice. It establishes your ability to integrate and document the key areas of design knowledge within the context of your major design project and through this, a readiness for employment within interior design professional practice.

The coursework records and responds to key stages of professional practice delivered through a range of lectures including from specialist contributors. The module aims to enable you to demonstrate a knowledge, understanding of and ability to evaluate the following five areas of study in relation to your major project and that this is effectively and appropriately communicated:

1. cultural context;
2. professional and regulatory requirements;
3. environment and sustainability;
4. construction, materials and specification;
5. communication.

The module aims to provide you with the means to demonstrate, through and in relation to your own design work, the extent of your understanding and evaluation of these key areas of professional interior design knowledge that inform a design project. The employability and professional practice lectures offered will enable you to better understand the industry, allowing you to make informed choices and prepare a career strategy.

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Major Project Realisation: Interior Architecture and Design

This module currently runs:
all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

(core, 30 credits)

This Major Project module enables you to prepare for independent practice in the workplace or to progress onto higher studies. It is the opportunity to synthesise your specialist knowledge and skills and effectively communicate these. In this module, you will carry out the project conceived and developed in the parallel Project Design and Development for Interiors module, fully realising it in appropriate form by its conclusion.

You will exercise and display your abilities in selecting, analysing and applying knowledge, skills and understanding to a negotiated and fully researched project in order to properly understand your strengths, interests and position in the field, and the potential for your future professional development.

You will show that you understand the complex and changing nature of problems in the professional sector of interior design and can devise and apply realistic strategies for constructing, applying and managing a process designed to provide solutions for complex situations with competing demands.

A professional standard of realisation, contextualisation and presentation will be expected, providing the elements for a portfolio of practice with which you may enter the fields of employment, self-employment or further studies.

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Project Design and Development for Interiors

This module currently runs:
all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

(core, 30 credits)

Together with your Major Project Realisation module, this module is intended to prepare interiors students for independent practice, entry into the professional workplace, or for higher study.

Through synthesis of knowledge of processes and principles, using an appropriate range of intellectual, creative and practical skills, you will research, analyse, design and develop a self-directed project. This will require in-depth investigation of a site, its cultural context, human inhabitation, activity and enterprise through a well-constructed design process involving practical and digital 2D and 3D methods of exploration and communication as a significant body of creative work for public exhibition.

A negotiated and approved proposal will confirm the individual project. Using creative exploration and experimentation, you will undertake research, selection, concept development, material investigation, modelling, prototyping and visualisation. The final outcome will be produced in the Major Project Realisation modules, and will be distinctive to the course in approach, scale, communication and visualisation or making and modelling.

This module will ensure that you review and reflect upon your own work and understand your prospective position in the creative sector. The module emphasises self-direction and personal focus whilst acknowledging external and professional expectations and constraints.

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Course details

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have one of the following:

  • 240 credits from a Higher National Diploma (HND), Foundation Degree (FdA/ FdSc) or equivalent international qualification in a relevant subject.
  • 240 credits from years 1 and 2 of an undergraduate degree (BA/BSc) in a relevant subject at a different institution
  • a portfolio interview

You must pass a portfolio interview where you'll be required to demonstrate an interest in, aptitude for and knowledge of the field of architecture. If it is not possible to attend the interview, you'll be required to submit a portfolio of work by email.

Please be aware that digital portfolios cannot be viewed at the interview.

Portfolios and interviews

Your portfolio should be selective, but have enough work to show a range of your interests and talents. We are interested in seeing how you develop a project from beginning to end, not only finished work.

If you cannot bring certain pieces of your work to your portfolio interview, please take photographs and include them.

Physical portfolio

If you are coming in person to your interview we strongly suggest bringing a physical portfolio of work.

Things to bring:

  • Sketchbooks– we love to see your sketchbooks with ideas and notes, even if they are messy.
  • Examples of the development of a project from start to finish and the final outcome.
  • Some work that you are really proud of and want to talk about.
  • Some work that shows you experimenting with different processes.

Digital Portfolio

If you are submitting an online application, please follow these guidelines.

Things to include:

  • Scans or photographs demonstrating items from the list above.
  • Storyboarding for motion-based work.
  • Also include scans of sketchbook pages showing development.
  • Be sure to check the resolution and overall quality of your image to ensure submissions are not pixelated.

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Any university-level qualifications or relevant experience you gain prior to starting university could count towards your course at London Met. Find out more about applying for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL).

English language requirements

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Student visa (previously Tier 4) you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. This course requires you to meet our standard requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

You'll be assessed via your portfolio presentations, illustrated documents, a dissertation, essays, seminar papers and tests.

The collaborative nature of this course prepares you to work with confidence as a specialist in design or architectural practice where interacting with other professionals and construction industry processes requires a range of skills and experience beyond the purely creative.

Our architecture graduates have gone on to exciting careers as architects, design consultants, architectural assistants and designers at impressive practices including Tony Fretton Architects, Eric Parry Architects, Stephen Taylor Architects, Adamson Associates Architects, and Conrad and Partners.

We currently have three locations in Holloway, Aldgate and Shoreditch. As we evolve as a University, we'll be reviewing the use of these spaces to ensure all our students have access to the facilities and study areas they need to succeed. This means the campus where this course is taught may change over time.

The experience of our students will always be our top priority and we'll notify applicants and students of any changes to their teaching location at the earliest opportunity.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Follow our School of Art, Architecture and Design on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to stay up to date with everything that's happening in our creative community.

How to apply

If you're a UK applicant wanting to study full-time starting in September, you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified. If you're an international applicant wanting to study full-time, you can choose to apply via UCAS or directly to the University.

If you're applying for part-time study, you should apply directly to the University. If you require a Student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

To find out when teaching for this degree will begin, as well as welcome week and any induction activities, view our academic term dates.

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