Interior Design - BA (Hons) - Undergraduate course | London Metropolitan University
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Interior Design - BA (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Entry requirements Modular structure What our students say After the course How to apply Meet the team Visit us

Why study this course?

Discover how interior design responds to and reflects our ever-changing society. You’ll work with industry leaders to gain hands-on skills and experience through a range of live commercial and community projects – from retail, workspace and hospitality projects to education and healthcare. Covering every aspect of interior design, you’ll gain all the skills you need to succeed in your career.

Urban Sketching Hackney, The Canal - Ewelina Ruminska
Urban Sketching Hackney,The canal,Ewelina-Ruminska

By Ewelina Rumin

Tech Module - Mariachiara Dal Pozzo
Tech Module, Mariachiara Dal Pozzo

By Mariachiara Dal Pozzo

Shortditch Exchange - Francesca Parpinel
Shortditch Exchange, Francesca Parpinel

By Francesca Parpinel

Shortditch Exchange Anchor - Selena Grasso
Shortditch Exchange Anchor, Selena Grasso-2

By Selena Grasso

Shortditch Exchange Anchor - Selena Grasso
Shortditch Exchange Anchor, Selena Grasso

By Selena Grasso

RSA Nomination - Louisa Cole
RSA Nomination, Louisa Cole

By Louisa Cole

PORT - Louisa Evan
PORT, Louisa Evan

By Louisa Evan

PORT - Louisa Evan
PORT, Louisa Evan-2

By Louisa Evan

Mobile Modular unit - Stanimira Velikova
Mobile Modular unit, Stanimira Velikova

By Stanimira Velikova

Mobile Unit - Stanimira Velikova
Mobile Unit, Stanimira Velikova

By Stanimira Velikova

Huguenot Urban Garden Learning
Huguenot Urban Garden Learning, Martina Terracciano

By Martina Terracciano

Millenium Mills - Ewelina Ruminska
Millenium Mills,Ewelina Ruminska

By Ewelina Ruminska

Louboutin Furniture Le Palace Interiors - Ewelina-Ruminiska
Louboutin Furniture Le Palace Interiors, Ewelina Ruminiska

By Ewelina-Ruminiska

Interior Design
Interior Design Workshop with Gensler

Workshop with Gensler

Hermitage Structure
Hermitage Structure, Mock-up

Mock-up

Hermitage Construction
Hermitage Construction, Studio1

Interiors Studio1

Millennium Mills
Julie Berdou Millennium Mills

Work by Julie Berdou

Millienium Mills
Millienium Mills, by Francescal Parpinel

By Francesca Parpinel

Millennium Mills Silver Town
Ewelina Ruminska, Millennium Mills Silver Townjpg

Work by Ewelina Ruminska

RSA Competition Winner
Julia Berdou RSA Compertition Winner

Work by Julie Berdou

Shoreditch Exchange
Farida Hasan, Shoreditch Exchange

Work by Farida Hasan

Interior Millenium Mills
Julie Berdou Interior Millenium Mills

Work by Julie Berdou

Underground Boutique
Underground Boutique, Victoria Roberts 2013

Work by Victoria Roberts

Presentation board Co Worker Space
Presenation board Co Worker Space, Sara Mitrova

Wok by Sara Mitrova

Lambretta Social Club
Lambretta Social Club

Work by Maya Fabri

Interior Design students explore Sherringham
Interior Design students explore Sherrngham

Banbury Walker Internship Competition
Banbury Walker Internship Competition
By Radan Cicen

Work by Radan Cicen

More about this course

Interior design is an exhilarating practice responding to the rapid pace of the interiors industry. It involves an exciting range of projects embracing commercial, social and temporary projects such as workspaces, hotels, retail, museums, exhibitions, and health and educational spaces. This Interior Design BA will introduce you to the latest research as well as industry professionals who will bring their knowledge and experience to the course.

Your first year  – through an active and holistic learning and teaching programme – is designed to develop your thinking, key skills and understanding of the industry and related practice, allowing you to produce a portfolio and discover your career aspirations through explorative approaches. You’ll explore sketching, drawing, sketch-modelling and the production of scaled accurate models through workshop practice and orthographic techniques, with digital software also used to strengthen your ideas and skills. This will guide you into your second year where we ask you to choose a studio in which to cultivate your design philosophy, sector specialisms and professional skills. The course also offers an opportunity to work within the industry and gain real life work experience with an interior design company, which is assessed as part of your degree. We then build on this in the third year and advance your individuality and expertise through both studio specialisms and a mentoring scheme leading you towards successful employment.

Our studios are run by practitioners and experts in their field who develop a series of year-long projects covering contemporary and relevant design issues and topics. We work with well-known businesses, associations, and museums and galleries running live projects. This gives you the opportunity to discuss and exhibit your projects, which in turn helps you to develop a range of professional presentational skills.

The course takes place in the heart of London's creative district, which gives you access to an abundance of live projects and industry mentors. You’ll be surrounded by the best interior practices in London from Shoreditch, Clerkenwell, the West End and Mayfair.

We also promote an entrepreneurial spirit, which leads to students participating in national and international competitions and taking advantage of volunteering opportunities.

The teaching on this course received a 95.5% student satisfaction rate in the 2018 National Student Survey.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods are used throughout the course. These range from formative, summative, diagnostic, peer and self-assessment methods, through to studio based work, workshops, and CAD and digital projects and exercises. Feedback is given throughout the course.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code WK21
Entry requirements View
Apply now

Entry requirements

In addition to the University’s standard entry requirements, you will normally be expected to obtain:

  • a minimum grade BBC in three A levels from relevant subject areas such as the arts, humanities and social sciences (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification in relevant art and design subjects)
  • a portfolio review
  • English language GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above

We encourage applications from international/EU students with equivalent qualifications. We also accept mature students with diverse backgrounds and experiences.

Suitable applicants living in the UK will be invited to a portfolio interview. Applicants living outside the UK will be required to submit a portfolio of work via email.

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Art and Design Extended Degree (with Foundation Year).

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Portfolios and interviews

Your portfolio should be selected but have enough work to show the range of your interests and talents. We are interested in seeing how you develop a project from beginning to end, not only finished work.

Interior designers make models as well as flatwork, so 3D work may be relevant as well as 2D.

If you cannot bring it to portfolio interview, take photographs and include them.

We always want to see traditional drawing whether observational, life or concept generating, so please include this, even if you have good CAD skills already.

Finally, be ready to talk about your work and how you see your future as an interior designer.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    Critical and Contextual Studies (CCS) Level 4 aims to orient and critically engage students in the history and theory of their discipline, its extent and conventions, and its broader social and material context in culture and contemporary practice.

    The module helps students to reflect on what they see, and to read connections between different ideas that have shaped their discipline. In particular the module investigates how thinking and articulating ideas about practice in their field might be framed – for example in relation to history, the economy, society and the environment, or through theory and practice.

    The module introduces students to a range of academic skills needed to produce a graduate-level study in their final year. It helps students to develop their own interests, and to reflect on and take responsibility for the development of their own learning. This includes surveys in the history of their discipline, research and writing workshops, seminars, library sessions, visits and tours in addition to guided independent learning.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    Successful design outcomes are reliant on sound design principles. These design principles inform and create opportunities for students to apply their creativity to the conception, development and eventual realisation of effective design solutions.

    Design is intent on bringing about change, impacting on human experience. This module introduces a range of contemporary and traditional discipline-related design approaches and processes, some of which will be tested in design exercises and some of which may be realised in studios and projects carried across other modules. Students will be introduced to systems and methods of research, observation and analysis, ranging from human behaviour, experience and cultural context to site, building and materials. The module will develop an understanding of spatial awareness linked to design and the organisation of space, interventions and added elements.

    Design concepts will be tested through the application of exercises, workshop and studio methods through a range of drawing techniques, modelling and making. Materials, processes and technologies are introduced, developing creative outcomes relevant to the possibilities and constraints of the context, the needs of the client and users, and industry conventions and regulations.

    Students are encouraged to develop a critically informed and personal approach to the process of design. Studio practice and projects encourage the development of strategies, idea generation in practice and the testing of concepts in the context of a rapidly changing contemporary culture with ever-developing needs and problems. In this way, by engaging with materials, media and, processes, interior designers become agents of change through their design practice.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    By progressing from the scale of the building to that of interior components and materials, this module provides an introduction to technologies, materials and the communication and making practices of designers working with the interior. Students will be asked to investigate historic and contemporary uses and design within a given interior.

    It specifically establishes an understanding of key building technology by introducing typical building construction of historic and contemporary buildings. The principles of building services and environmental design in the design of interior spaces will also be introduced. Materials, their properties, selection and application will be considered and tested.

    Additionally, students will develop communication techniques appropriate to the diversity of information designers use and audiences targeted. These will include the use of different orthogonal drawing conventions, diagrams and sketches, and a range of model making types and making processes.

    The module will use different methods to establish this knowledge; site visits and surveys, case studies, making and drawing workshops, as well as lectures, seminars and the utilisation of a wide variety of published sources.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module introduces students to the ‘spatial journey’, a critical term used throughout the subject field of interior design.

    This module encourages students to explore and manipulate the spatial qualities of interiors by applying design principles relating to, for example, the rhythm, pattern and differentiation of architectural and environmental features in their contexts, which are often termed the spatial journey throughout the interiors industry.

    It considers human responses, both ergonomic and anthropometric, to commercial and community spaces and environments, and the specific impact of these spaces on people. Students will observe the physical and emotional values of space and learn how to relate space to its purpose. Examples of real spatial environments will be surveyed and documented, using industry standard recording and publishing techniques and tools.

    Students will develop and present proposals relating to a spatial journey, exploring ways to manipulate spatial choices and realising ideas visually through drawings, models and visualisation techniques. They will be introduced to sector-specific traditional and digital design modelling techniques, and the visualisation and presentation skills necessary for the practising designer. The module will be delivered through the design studio, normally including a range of exercises within teams and as individuals and through an approach that supports the generation and development of design proposals, the module will facilitate the realisation of concepts and projects generated in other modules.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    Critical and Contextual Studies 2 continues to orient and critically engage students in the history and theory of their discipline, its extent and conventions, and its broader social and material context in culture and contemporary practice. It builds on studies undertaken in Level 4 and prepares students as independent thinkers, capable of selecting an appropriate topic and producing a sustained piece of independent study in the form of a dissertation in Level 6.

    The module continues to situate the student within the process of constructing knowledge about their discipline, its history, context, and its professional and ethical dimension. It rehearses the analytical and discursive skills students need to become knowledgeable about the authorities, objects and methods in their field; to understand the roles, locations and responsibilities of important players whilst examining the broader ethical questions relevant to their discipline; and to become conversant with current debates across the subject area. This process may be approached from the point of view of the producer or consumer, the critic or the professional, the academic or the practitioner.

    Students are encouraged to think creatively and to take responsibility for the development of their own learning. The module recognises that the student is also an active contributor in the process: what students bring to the construction of knowledge counts – and how effectively they construct this knowledge depends on how well they understand the field of their discipline.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Materiality (form, colour, surface and texture) affects meaning and value in all design. This module requires your critical evaluation of subtle and implicit design details, reflecting ethical and environmental design proposals expressed through materials and construction, considering how material selection and manipulation endows the artefact and/or interior with qualities and values.

    Students will explore and experiment with both physical and virtual material representation, drawing on concepts and ideas originally generated within the studio. Outcomes will be developed through material and/ or constructional experimentation including scaled interventions or working models. Students will realise relevant design solutions for studio briefs, in response to specific end-users and/or sites.

    Through in-depth practice-led research, students will consider the sustainable, social, functional and environmental impacts of material choices and the performance of these upon designed-spaces or objects.

    Students will work towards a professional standard of presentation, developing a logical and creative approach to design problem solving, appropriate to the needs of users and clients.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    As humans, we live in a continuous and ongoing relationship with the made world, where the former and the latter each inform the other. This module aims to show how understanding of the human body (its scale, proportions and movement) and awareness of sociological and physiological human behaviour are key aspects of successful design. This module will examine how humans live and work together and how the body is a site for debate, performance and politics through contemporary and historical civilizations.

    Close observation of the interaction between the body and its immediate environment will be at the core of this area of study. It will show how analysis of the human being, at a range of scales, is vital to relevant, safe and ethical, innovative design that responds to physical and sensory needs. Environmental observation and reflection will be documented through a range of media, analysed to support the generation of concepts and design ideas.

    Informed selection and application of material processes are an intrinsic part of the design and production of both objects and the made environment. Workshop activities will explore and test ideas, resolving design issues through modelling in traditional and digital materials and technologies. Material experimentation and knowledge will enhance both the concept and its communication.

    You will normally select from a range of studio projects, working with contemporary ideas and practicing designers, mentored by professional practices as appropriate to the project.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module develops and applies the knowledge and skills established in DN4008 Interior Materials and Technologies, and in preparation for DN6029, Integrated Design Practice, at Level 6. The module will develop students’ understanding and confidence in approaching the production of interior spaces through strategic and detailed design processes.

    The module focuses in detail, through a series of analytical and reflective precedents, on how different aspects of context and history, and of material, construction, services and environmental design, interact in the context of large or complex interiors and buildings. The module will provide a progressively more detailed knowledge of the interior from structure through interior organisation, to details of fixings, fittings and surfaces.

    The module introduces methods, terms and techniques that can be used to evaluate and describe the range of different relationships that appear under the heading of technology. In particular, the module investigates interiors that may involve multiple clients, for example, retail, hotels or public buildings. It examines how and why standards are developed as well as the remit for research and experiment.

    The development and production of a range of drawn (manual and CAD) and written information is used to establish an understanding of professional standards in design communication and the individual’s scope to represent ideas and decisions precisely.

    The module features a work placement adding practical, relevant, insightful experience to the curriculum where a strategic and informed approach to the workplace can start to develop, this is embedded and developed through CV and portfolio development techniques.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    Critical and Contextual Studies (CCS) Level 6 results in an independent dissertation. It builds on two years of undergraduate study that critically engages students in the history and theory of their discipline, its extent and conventions, and its broader social and material context in culture and contemporary practice.

    Students undertake an enquiry into a topic of their own choice and, based on this enquiry, develop a sustained critical study in support of their practice, building on techniques and knowledge developed in previous years. This study demonstrates the student’s ability to thoroughly research a topic, use appropriate methods of investigation, and work in a methodical and organised way to develop a coherent argument. It affords a sophisticated instrument for interrogating, testing and presenting ideas, and encourages the student to deploy and develop a variety of skills to show how well they can conduct and present a critical investigation.

    The module rewards criticality and innovation, and provides a platform for ambitious independent work. To this end, it offers individual supervision designed to support the student’s learning. The subject matter of the dissertation can be theoretical, technical, or historical. In terms of format, the dissertation may be envisaged in different ways and can include visual, technical or other non-written material which may form the subject of the enquiry and comprise an integral part of the whole.

    The dissertation may be practice-based and include field-work and primary research in its methodology; or it might be academic and theoretical in its outlook and draw predominantly on secondary sources. Its form and approach can reflect a broad range of discipline-specific approaches based on discussion and agreement with the supervisor and/or course leader.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The module provides a link between the completion of their undergraduate studies and interior design practice. It establishes a student’s ability to integrate the key areas of their interior design knowledge within the context of their major design project and through this, their readiness for professional practice.
    The coursework records and responds to the process of design development and, using a range of specialist contributions, introduces a range of issues, interests and perspectives. The process is recorded, evaluated, presented and reviewed in relation to the comprehensive design project.
    At the end of their undergraduate studies the module aims to provide students with the means to demonstrate, through and in relation to their own design work, the extent of their understanding and evaluation of key areas of professional interior design knowledge informing a design project.
    This module aims to enable students to demonstrate that within their comprehensive design project they have a knowledge, understanding of and ability to evaluate the following five areas of study and that this is effectively and appropriately communicated:

    A. cultural context
    B. professional and regulatory requirements
    C. environmental and sustainability
    D. construction, materials and specification
    E. communication

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This Major Project module enables Interior Design students to prepare for independent practice in the workplace or to progress onto higher studies. It is the opportunity to synthesise their specialist knowledge and skills and effectively communicate these. In this module, they will carry out the project conceived and developed in the parallel Project Design and Development module, fully realising it in appropriate form by the end of the module.

    Students will exercise and display their abilities in selecting, analysing and applying knowledge, skills and understanding to a negotiated and fully researched project in order to properly understand strengths, interests and position in the field, and the potential for future professional development.

    Students will show that they understand the complex and changing nature of problems in the professional sector of Interior Design and can devise and apply realistic strategies for constructing, applying and managing a process designed to provide solutions.

    A professional standard of realisation, contextualisation and presentation will be expected, providing the elements for a portfolio of practice with which they may enter the field of employment or self-employment or further studies.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Together with their Major Project Realisation module, this module is intended to prepare interiors students for independent practice, entry into the professional workplace, or for higher study.

    Through synthesis of knowledge of processes and principles, using an appropriate range of intellectual, creative and practical skills, students will research, analyse, design and develop a self-directed project. This will naturally require in-depth investigation of a site, its cultural context, human inhabitation, activity and enterprise through a well-constructed design process involving practical and digital 2D and 3D methods of exploration and communication as a significant body of creative work for public exhibition.

    A negotiated and approved proposal will confirm the individual project. Using creative exploration and experimentation, students will undertake research, selection, concept development, material investigation, modelling/ prototyping and visualisation. The final outcome will be produced in the course - specific Major Project Realisation modules, and will be distinctive to the course in approach, scale, communication and visualisation or making and modelling.

    This module will ensure that students critique and reflect upon their own work and position in the creative sector. The module emphasises self-direction and personal focus whilst acknowledging external and professional expectations and constraints.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

What our students say

"Returning to education after 20 years with limited computer skills was not an easy journey. But London Met, alongside its inspirational teaching, has given me the ability to soar..." Cavell Browne Richardson

"The journey I have made has been immense, significant and challenging, but most of all life-changing. Completing my degree will be the start of a new chapter in my life, built on the foundation of London Met." Beata Piotrzkowska

"In the second year I had the pleasure of winning an internship with Fitch and in the third year to be nominated for the D&AD Pencil Awards. The mentoring offered a great opportunity to connect with people from the industry and helped me to get a job. The final year exhibitions helped give my portfolio more exposure and many positive responses." Anna Czarnowska

We were working across so many projects, but I found it wasn’t just about your skill, at Jestico + Wiles its developing lots and lots of ideas too. What was the most fascinating was working with a huge range of materials. It’s a really interesting and important aspect of design that I didn’t understand before, getting to know the kinds of materials you can work with influences your choices in design.” Yasemen Gokce on her second year work placement at Jestico + Wiles.

 

After the course

You’ll graduate from the course with all the skills and confidence you need to succeed in commercial practice. Past graduates have found work as interior designers, interior architects, retail and exhibition designers, and many now work for some of the most successful practices in London representing leading high street brands and international companies. Others have gone on to work in TV and film set design, animation, lighting design and journalism.

As part of your course, you’ll also have the opportunity to undertake a work placement at a leading London design practice, helping you develop the skills and contacts you need to succeed in your future career. In 2016 students were placed at 50 design companies including Foster + Partners, Gensler and turnerbates.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

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How to apply

Apply to us for September 2018

It's not too late to start this course in September.

Applying for a full-time undergraduate degree starting this September is quick and easy - simply call our Clearing hotline on .

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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News and success stories

Meet the team

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