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Psychology - BSc (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Entry requirements Modular structure What our students say After the course How to apply Meet the team Visit us

Why study this course?

Psychology is central to understanding people and their behaviour. This British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited course combines psychological theory with evidence-based knowledge from many different areas. You'll be exploring genetics, biology, child development, personality, society and culture.

In the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of all 2017 graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

Through psychology you can learn about the way genetics, childhood development, personality, society and culture influence our behaviour. On this course, you’ll challenge assumptions and explore questions such as: do girls prefer pink? What turns a peaceful demonstration into a riot? Why do some romantic relationships work and others don’t? Why do some people develop eating disorders or phobias and why do some people take illegal drugs?

In your first year, you’ll gain a broad introduction to the key domains of human behaviour, as well the essential research methods required by all psychologists. In your second year, you'll broaden your knowledge base and explore more complex ideas, such as intelligence, creativity, decision making and prejudice. Your final year will offer you the chance to specialise in areas that interest you. You’ll also undertake an individual research project under the supervision of an academic tutor. The knowledge you’ll gain from this course can be applied in the real-world to lots of different contexts and situations.

Enrolling in London Met's Psychology course provides the perfect foundation to go on to postgraduate study and to train as a professional psychologist.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through examinations, coursework, practical reports and presentations. Your final year will include an individual research project.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society, and is the first step towards training as a professional psychologist.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code C800
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BCC in three A levels or minimum grades BC in at least two A levels in academic or business subjects (or a minimum of 104 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma; or Advanced Diploma; or Progression Diploma; or Access to HE Diploma with 60 credits)
  • English Langauge and Mathematics GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

Entry from appropriate foundation and access courses will also be considered.

If you don’t have traditional qualifications or can’t meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the BSc Psychology Extended Degree.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Specific qualifications that may make you eligible for advanced entry to this course include a relevant foundation degree, HND or equivalent.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The aims of the module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher education Qualifications. Specifically, this module aims to introduce students to some of the foundational theories within cognitive psychology and developmental psychology, including a prehistory of cognition that examines some of the earlier approaches to human thought and behaviour. Students will also be introduced to some classic research studies that will help them to evaluate theories of cognition and development. In the cognition tutorials there will be the opportunity to replicate, and participate in, classic experiments and in the developmental seminars, the opportunity to watch and discuss existing developmental research. This module also aims to provide students with the qualities and transferrable skills necessary for employment requiring: written communication skills, discussion contribution, independent study and time keeping, summation and evaluation skills, and understanding of the scientific method and ethical research consideration

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, this module aims to introduce students to the practice of conducting and reporting research in psychology, and to develop students’ skills in identifying, analysing and evaluating information. Students will develop their understanding of the link between psychological research questions and psychological investigation methods, and will be introduced to simple data description and analysis techniques; to a range of research methods employed in psychological investigation; and to computer applications that contribute to the conduct and presentation of psychological research. Consideration will be given to codes of practice for psychology researchers, ethics in psychology research, and research reporting conventions. As such, this module encourages students to develop practical, intellectual and interpersonal skills that are of use in many employment settings, and also provides students with a toolkit of intellectual and practical academic skills which will assist their progression to modules at levels 5 & 6.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The aims of this module are to (1) provide students with an understanding of key theories and models of personality as explanations for individual behaviour along with social psychological theories which seek to understand individual behaviour in its wider social context; and (2) develop students’ understanding of how psychological explanations of individual differences and social behaviour can be applied to real world events and experiences. This knowledge and understanding will help students’ employment skills by enabling them to appreciate the different perspectives that are needed to fully understand individual behaviour in everyday life. The module also develops students’ understanding of some key principles underlying psychological research, which will facilitate progression to modules at Level 5. The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, this module aims to
    • Develop students’ ability to study and learn at HE level.
    • Enable students to reflect upon and develop their abilities in oral and written communication, selecting, analysing and evaluating information, and interpersonal relationship management.
    • Support students in understanding and creating a profile of personal and professional skills, attributes and achievements
    • Give students the opportunity to experience and make use of peer support.

    As such, the student skills element of this module encourages students to develop practical, intellectual and interpersonal skills that are of use in many employment settings, and also provides students with a toolkit of intellectual and practical academic skills which will assist their progression to modules at levels 5 & 6.

    Aims for Biological Psychology module:
    • Provide an introduction to the fundamentals of biological psychology.
    • Provide a framework for evaluating biological research methods, ideas and theories.
    • Introduce the use of data from both humans and animals
    • encourage independent learning through developing library skills and the ability to provide evidence and to support or refute ideas

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    The first aim of this module is to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of theories in cognitive psychology, and theories of cognitive and social change throughout the lifespan. The second aim is to facilitate students’ ability to think critically about these theories, especially in the context of empirical evidence. Thirdly, related to the previous aim this module also aims to develop students’ skills in locating primary sources, and to read, understand and accurately communicate the information within. The ability to source information, evaluate it and provide a summation is a useful transferable skill necessary in a wide variety of employment. The deployment of theoretical research into a practical based application is also a key transferable skill.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    The aims of this module are to provide students with an understanding of (1) key theories and models of personality and individual differences and related research; (2) key theories and models of social behaviour and related research; (3) how these areas can be scientifically investigated using appropriate research methodologies; (4) how knowledge of individual differences and social psychology can be applied to the ‘real-world’ and their relevance to a range of settings. This will develop students’ employability by providing a basis of knowledge and understanding which will be beneficial in future work and training (e.g. understanding interpersonal and intergroup relations). The module also fosters students’ knowledge of research methodology (e.g. psychometrics) and fosters skills in the development of psychological assessment, academic argument and critical evaluation.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    1. To evaluate key biological, genetic & evolutionary theories of behaviour

    2. To facilitate students’ critical appraisal of these theories in terms of (a) their internal logic and (b) data from controlled and observational research

    3. To encourage independent learning through the access of background information using appropriate primary and secondary sources.

    The module contributes to the practical application of theoretical positions to real world problems, thereby providing additional transferable skills, e.g. evidence based practice, research and synthesis.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    The aim of this module is introduce students to methods of psychological investigation and to develop their ability to design such investigations, to understand the ethical implications of the methods used, and to assess the data collected.
    The module aims to develop students’ competence in
    1. working in a small group
    2. designing psychological research
    3. the implementation of agreed ethical standards
    4. liaising with external parties, i.e. participants in the study
    5. managing and analysing both quantitative and qualitative data and
    6. reporting on the outcome of the studies in a format proscribed by the relevant professional body.

    Each of these aims is associated with general competencies that are highly valued in employment settings (e.g., communication, negotiation, numeracy, teamwork). The module also aims to provide students with the platform from which then can extend their knowledge, for example in conducting project work at level 6 and in the broader context after graduation.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 2 (Level 6) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, this module aims to provide students with the opportunity to critically consider the nature of employability and to assess, reflect upon, and develop their own employability skills, attributes and attitudes. Students will be introduced to self-assessment and career planning tools and resources that will support this process. Finally, this module aims to give students the opportunity to apply their learning in an employment context, and to identify and plan for their ongoing training and development needs.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:
    1. Independent study, self-management, and time keeping
    2. Being able to develop in-depth understanding of a selected topic
    3. Critical thinking
    4. Creative problem solving
    5. Ability and willingness to work with supervisor and peers (if applicable) as a team
    6. Understanding of the scientific method
    7. Ability to collect valid and reliable research data through an ethically sound process
    8. Understanding of statistics and/or qualitative data analysis and ability to apply them to real data
    9. Ability to write a complete professional report of research findings
    10. Ability to present orally an empirical study and its findings

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module allows students to develop and integrate their knowledge of biological psychology with reference to clinical disorders. The module will consider the neuropharmacological, neurophysiological and neuropsychological aspects of psychiatric and neurological disorders such as addiction, Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces students to Clinical and Health Psychology as applied areas within the discipline to allow informed and realistic decisions about further education and training in clinical and health psychology. The module aims to critically appraise key perspectives and approaches to clinical and health psychology as well as to evaluate diagnoses, explanations and treatments that are applied to a range of physical and mental disorders. Students will have the opportunity to investigate the role played by physiological, psychological and social mechanisms in the causation and treatment of physical illness and psychological disorders.

    Students will gain experience in constructing case reports thus providing an additional transferable skill for future employment. The aims of this module have been developed in accordance to the QAA, CQC, NICE guidelines and BPS code of conduct and ethics.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    The module aims for students to understand philosophical, behaviourist and cognitive theories of emotion. In addition, students will understand how normal and disordered theories of emotion might be combined to a common framework, capable of explaining both normal and disordered emotions. Additionally, students will build on previous critical reading skills and discussion: some sessions will require prior reading of research papers and discussion of these in class time. This will encourage active participation from students, which is useful experience for the workplace, following graduation.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module introduces students to the discipline of counselling psychology as one of the main forms of applied psychological practice accredited by the British Psychological Society in the United Kingdom. The module will cover counselling psychology in theory, clinical practice and research. Through developing an understanding of this branch of applied psychology.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    A focus on contemporary evolutionary psychology including the origins of psychopathology and artificial intelligence will be included. There is a growing interest in Darwinian ‘medicine’ to supplement the aetiology of disease and psychopathology and how technology can support and promote health behaviours. Further, reference to dating, attraction, bond pairing and mating strategies etc will be provided where students will be encouraged to critically review the literature on EP via assessment and workshop discussions.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, this module aims to provide students with a solid basis of knowledge and understanding of the application of empirical research and theory in psychology to the study of contemporary issues and processes within the criminal justice system.

    Through engagement with the teaching, learning, and assessment opportunities provided, students will develop skills in the integration, evaluation and critical application of psychological literature, the construction of argument, self-assessment and reflection.

    A final aim of the module is to provide students with an insight into and understanding of the potential for the practical application of psychology within forensic settings. This will be of benefit to students in making choices about the possibility of pursuing further study or a career in forensic psychology.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    Educational environments interact with individuals’ unique genetic profiles and neurobiology, leading to wide individual differences in learning ability, motivation, and achievement. The module will provide new insights into the origins of individual differences in education traits such as cognitive abilities (e.g. IQ) and learning difficulties (e.g. dyslexia); motivation and personality; behavioural and emotional problems; social functioning and academic achievement. The module will also examine factors that influence both typical and atypical neurodevelopment (to the extent that those factors are linked to educational performance). Finally, the module will provide an overview of the learning deficits that individuals with learning disabilities (e.g. Specific Language Impairments disorder) experience.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    This module is designed to develop students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in qualitative research. Emphasis will be placed on the exploration of the links between epistemology, methodology and theoretical explanations in psychology. In doing this, students will be introduced to a range of qualitative approaches to data collection and data analysis.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    The aims of this module are to (1) provide students with an advanced understanding of developments in theory and research in (a) personality and individual differences and (b) social and cultural psychology; (2) introduce alternative and challenging perspectives on mainstream psychological phenomena; (3) develop and extend students’ understanding of the application of psychological theory to contemporary social issues. The module will enhance students’ employability through knowledge of alternative perspectives on taken-for-granted explanations of psychological phenomena; provide a deeper understanding of how individual, social and cultural factors can influence personal and social wellbeing; provide skills relevant to the application of theoretical knowledge and critical evaluation. The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    Students will gain a critical understanding of a range of theories, models, applied research and application within work and organisational contexts. They will work with organisational case studies and problem-based contexts, and thereby develop skills in applying psychological knowledge to the understanding of client needs and learn to provide solutions to address work problems, taking into account aspects of ethics and safety. In covering the five content areas of occupational psychology, as defined by the BPS, students will have an enhanced opportunity to enter related postgraduate studies – business psychology and/or occupational psychology. To enhance employability skills, students are presented with mini project-based learning opportunities followed by group presentations. Specifically, business related case studies are provided necessitating self-managed problem solving within groups. Students are thus given the opportunities to take effective and appropriate action, work effectively with others and develop self-management skills.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

What our students say

"I would recommend the psychology undergraduate degree to anyone, the knowledge and life skills you will learn are priceless and this degree will open more doors than you can imagine. I am a single mum to a teenager and I also work two different jobs but the support you get on this course from some brilliant lecturers enabled me to completely engage in the full-time degree and achieve very good grades. If a degree was easy, it wouldn't be worth the paper it is printed on but if you manage your time effectively and take advantage of the interesting, engaging, and at times fun lectures, seminars and workshops, there is every chance of qualifying with remarkable results. If I can do it, anyone can."

Emma Smith, former student

"I have a first-class honours degree in Psychology and was awarded the British Psychology Society Undergraduate Award at London Met. Currently, I am in the process of completing an MSc in clinical neuroscience at a prestigious university. I can honestly say that my experience at London Met was fantastic. The level of support that lecturers provide students along with effort is stupendous. London Met is a place where lecturers care not only about students' performance but about their wellbeing too."

Monica Pereira, former student

After the course

As your degree will be accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), you'll be able to progress on to postgraduate training to achieve Chartered Psychologist status.

Possible specialist areas include clinical psychology, counselling psychology, forensic psychology, educational psychology, health psychology and occupational psychology. 

You'll also develop transferable skills such as report writing, teamwork, time management organisation, IT and numeracy skills, which are valued by employers in a wide range of industries. For example, our graduates have gone on to work as a Support Worker at Creative Support, Trainee Mental Health worker at Highgate Mental Health Centre NHS and Sales Negotiator at Reids of Mayfair.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Apply to us for January 2019

Start a degree in the new year. Applying is quick and easy – simply call our January hotline on or apply to us online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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