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Music Technology and Production (including foundation year) - BSc (Hons)

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Why study this course?

Our Music Technology and Production (including foundation year) BSc (Hons) is a four-year degree with a built-in foundation year (Year 0), designed to provide you with an alternative route into higher education if you don’t have the necessary entry requirements to study a standard undergraduate degree. This course will teach you the important aspects of music technology and production. The foundation year of this course will help you build your academic ability and confidence, fully preparing you for the following three years of study.

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More about this course

Our Music Technology and Production (including foundation year) BSc (Hons) degree will provide you with a broad range of skills and techniques in sound, music and sonic arts.

The integrated foundation year on this four-year course is shared with other foundation degrees, allowing you to study alongside students who are interested in a variety of other specialisms and disciplines.

Throughout your foundation year you’ll develop a music technology portfolio, displaying the key proficiencies you have learned through hands-on, practice-based exercises. During the course you’ll explore the fundamental aspects of computer-based music production. The working practices and techniques you’ll develop include audio editing and mixing in our Music IT labs using Apple 5k iMacs, MIDI keyboards and a range of professional standard software including; Pro Tools 2018, Logic Pro X, Cycling ’74 Max 8, Ableton Live Suite and Steinberg Nuendo 8.

Our Music Enterprise module allows you to explore enterprise and business practices. You’ll learn the personal skills needed to develop an online presence in the form of proficiency portfolios, showcasing your work and skills to future clients and employers.

The Sound and Media module will develop your skills in the sonic arts, expanding to the music, games and film industries. You’ll establish interdisciplinary skills including recording and design of foley and sound effects for games, films and mobile apps, interactive arts and immersive media, as well as recording of original sounds, location, ADR and effects to support interactivity, narrative and action. If you find yourself more interested in studying another subject during your foundation year, there will be flexibility to do this.

Our tutors and course leaders in the London Met music department are active researchers and music industry experts who boast international careers. They have first-hand experience working with successful performers and organisations such as Clean Bandit, Echobelly, Kate Nash, Imelda May, Wolf Alice, British Broadcasting Channel (BBC), Sky and Channel 4, and continue to present their work throughout Europe, America, East Asia and Australia.

If you find yourself more interested in studying another subject during your foundation year, there will be flexibility to do this.

You'll graduate with a full undergraduate degree with the same title and award as those who studied the traditional three-year course.

Following your foundation year, you’ll continue to study the same subjects and get the same choice of modules as those studying our Music Technology and Production BSc (Hons) degree.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed through projects, in-class exams, studio reports and research essays. In your final year you’ll have the choice of producing either a dissertation or a project-based investigative study.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code W306
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • at least one A level (or a minimum of 48 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Subsidiary/National/BTEC Extended Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C (grade 4) or above (or equivalent eg Functional Skills at Level 2)

We encourage applications from International/EU students with equivalent qualifications.

We also accept mature students with diverse backgrounds and experiences.

Suitable applicants living in the UK may be invited to a portfolio interview. Applicants living outside the UK may be required to submit a small portfolio of works via email.

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 0 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    No module details available
    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module introduces students to the Music sector in relation to enterprise and business practices, it will provide insight in to the structure of the Music industry from its formation in the early 20th Century to the present day, highlighting sectors of employment and job roles available to them.

    Important elements of Copyright, Contracts, Distribution and Royalty management will be introduced, with a focus on digital distribution and the future of the Music industry.

    Therefore, the module investigates the key music business practices needed to prepare students for careers in the industry, whether self-managed portfolio career musicians, music producers or engineers.

    The module will enable the students to develop their entrepreneurial skills, encouraging critical thinking in regards to their path in the Music sector and progressing into Higher Education.

    The structure of this module will be separated into two semesters, providing the core information in the first semester, through seminars and guest lectures, working towards guided group work in the second semester researching and creating a business plan.


    Aims of the Module:

    1. To introduce students to music as an industry and an opportunity for enterprise, highlighting career paths, areas of growth and potential future roles.
    2. To promote students’ entrepreneurial thinking in regards to a career in the music industry.
    3. To give the preparatory skills and knowledge in putting together business plans and creating digital profiles which may lead to future opportunities for funding and investment.
    4. To develop key skills in research and analysis, in particular in regards to the music industry and preparing case studies.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This module will provide students with an introduction to sound and computer-based Music Production, it will facilitate the development of key skills and knowledge in sound and music practice.
    The module is structured around a staged development of the key principles of sound and digital audio, leading on to developing students’ critical skills in analysis of reference works and final practice with Digital Audio Workstations, in particular Logic Pro X through a series of exercises working towards a final project.
    The module is designed to facilitate the transition into undergraduate study by encouraging critical engagement and the development of basic skills and competencies in the realm of Music Production.
    Therefore, by the end of the module students will have developed an understanding of the roles of computers and DAW’s in the production of music, sound editing, mixing and exporting.

    Aims of the module:
    1. To provide students with the preparatory knowledge in sound, composition and digital audio in relation to computer-based music production.
    2. To develop students’ understanding of the roles in Music Production, key terminology, practices and skills.
    3. To introduce students to methods for describing their working processes and to present work-in-progress for different audiences.
    4. To develop students’ ability to be analytical, reflective and critical, through analysing reference works as well as their own productions.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module will provide students with an introduction to the production of sound and effects that are used for media products such as games, films and mobile apps. It will facilitate the development of key skills and knowledge in sound design and audio post-production.

    The module is structured around a staged development of the key principles of sound and media, leading on to developing students’ practice with recording and design of foley and sound effects for games, films and mobile apps, as well as recording of original sounds, location, ADR and effects to support interactivity, narrative and action.

    The module is designed to facilitate the transition into undergraduate study by encouraging critical engagement and the development of basic skills and competencies in the realm of Sound and Media.

    Therefore, by the end of the module students will have developed an understanding of a range of sound creation scenarios that might exist in a typical portfolio for someone working in the music industry and the sonic arts sector.

    Aims of the module:

    1. To provide students with the basic knowledge in the use of sound in media products.
    2. To develop students’ understanding of the roles in the production of sound for use in media products, key terminology, practices and skills.
    3. To introduce students to methods for describing their working processes and to present work-in-progress for different audiences.
    4. To develop students’ ability to be analytical, reflective and critical, through analysing reference works as well as their own productions.

    Read full details

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    No module details available
    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module offers students the opportunity to learn through engagement with practical projects in the studio. At the end of this module the student will have completed a substantial piece of work. In doing so, they will have travelled a journey through a production process that typically includes pre-production, experimentation, development and resolution.
    The module introduces students to the working practices of project work.
    At this level, the student selects a project from a menu of choices.
    This module is studied alongside and in integral relationship with MD4002 Media Skills and Practice 1.


    The module aims are:
    1. To provide students with the basic experience and skills sufficient to enable them to work independently towards completion of a level 5 project.
    2. To increase their understanding of practice through learning from and with other students.
    3. To permit students to learn to manage and plan their time effectively.
    4. To integrate creative, technical and critical learning and skills in their field of practice.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module introduces the skills, tools and methods that form the foundations for future practice as an animator, filmmaker or music technologist.
    Students learn through engagement in a series of practical projects designed to gradually develop relevant skills in the student’s chosen area of specialisation. At the end of this module the student will have completed a workbook that contains a mini-portfolio of assignments and a narrative of the working practices they have engaged with. The workbook/portfolio is designed to be a window on the process and will also document the student’s practice in MD4001 Creative Studio Practice 1.
    Central to the module will be an exploration of the overlap between technology, creativity and self-reflective critical practice.
    This module is studied alongside and in integral relationship with MD4001 Creative Studio Practice 1. In addition, the module introduces four areas of development, the career dossier, career plan, show reel, and exhibition skills that run throughout the course.

    The module aims are:
    • To provide students with key skills and knowledge in media practice.
    • To develop students’ knowledge of the processes of their practice.
    • To develop students’ ability to describe working processes and to present work-in-progress for different audiences.
    • To develop students’ ability to be analytical, reflective and critical.
    • To introduce career-planning skills and documentation.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    Module brief:
    This module provides a theoretical and practical framework to enable students to relate the auditory experience of music and performance to the material technologies that support and enable the making, transmission and various transformations. It develops a command of intersecting musical, technological and economic contexts, embracing creativity, authenticity, industry, commerce, communication, musical production, and the cultural hegemonies which affect our experience of different kinds of music making. The module integrates basic concepts of music theory as they affect and are affected by the development of technology. It engages the student in thinking critically about their subject area, how it is defined and practiced, the range and richness of its resources, and how it opens up questions of context; and it investigates how that context might be framed culturally, historically, economically, socially, theoretically and through practice. The module as a whole introduces students, through reflective practice, to the range of academic skills needed for their course, while encouraging them to take responsibility for and to articulate the development of their own learning
    The musical concepts, skills and vocabulary with which students are equipped are paralleled by an introduction to the formal study of the place of music, musicians and musical technologists in past and present cultures. It is recognised that the musical backgrounds of entrants to the course(s) – their experience, knowledge and attainment – vary; the approach adopted aims to include all, offering new approaches irrespective of the student’s prior musical education.
    Aims of the module:
    The module aims to orient and critically engage the student in the subject area, its histories and theories, and its broader context in culture and contemporary practice.
    The main aims of this module are:
    1. To develop core study, research and presentational skills.
    2. To examine the relationship between music technology with culture, commerce, creativity, authenticity, and technology.
    3. To consider how concepts of sound art, noise, music and soundscapes intersect.
    4. To develop the ability to write about music, musicians and associated technologies in a manner appropriate to undergraduate study.
    5. To examine the music industry, in particular the place of women in that industry, performance and the place of recording technologies and music for film, their transmission and reception.
    6. To develop an understanding of basic principles of musical structures and to develop skills of analytical listening.
    7. To develop understanding of the technological and cultural contexts which influence musical notation and production.
    8. To develop a working knowledge of the theoretical concepts of western music and instruments up to the present day and the technological and cultural events which have shaped those developments.

    Read full details

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module enables students to consolidate and build on the theoretical foundations laid down in modules at levels 4 through the planning, execution and critical reporting and review of a programme of practical work. It is delivered in two blocks of teaching.

    Block 1: Acoustics

    The effective use of the technologies associated with sound and music in a professional environment requires a secure understanding of the nature of sound: both the physical principles which govern its generation and propagation, and the psychological and cognitive principles which influence its reception by the hearing mechanism.

    This part of the module supports the practical work undertaken in the second block. It reviews and builds on Certificate level work on the nature of sound and vibration, and applies it to the study of the characteristics and behaviour of sound in the environment, and the mechanisms that enable sound localization, the perception of pitch, loudness and timbre and the perceptual organisation of the sound world around us.

    Block 2 : Practical project

    The nature and scope of the practical work undertaken in this second block will depend on specialism; in all cases, the module will foster in the students the ability to undertake independent, practical project work and to reflect upon the work undertaken; it will also develop the skill of presenting work to others.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module offers students the opportunity to learn through engagement with practical projects in the studio, to work with others in a collaborative way and to engage with issues that contextualise their practice. At the end of this module the student will have completed a substantial piece of work. In doing so, they will have travelled a journey through a production process, worked with other people and engaged with issues and external stakeholders.

    At the beginning of the module students will be introduced to the working practices of group and teamwork.

    At this level, the student is offered a choice of ‘live’ projects. These projects might be competitions, live briefs from external organisations or self-generated projects around themes.

    This module is taught alongside and in integral relationship with MD5002 Media Skills and Practice 2.

    The module aims are to:

    ● Extend students’ skills in working independently.
    ● Develop their skills in working with others in groups.
    ● Provide students with the experience of a live project and the skills of working with a client.
    ● Integrate their understanding of their developing practice with wider issues and contexts.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    Module brief:
    The module demonstrates how music functions within society and how it reflects cultural developments and both silences and serves as a voice for marginalised groups within society. It also reflects dominant culture and serves as their capital. It opens up questions of social, political, cultural, historical, technological theory and context. The module helps the student to research, access and use knowledge profitably, and to encourage them to make connections and articulate ideas. It examines a range of studies that address the character and conditions of cultural production. This process may be approached from the point of view of the producer or consumer, the critic or the professional, the academic or the practitioner. The module recognises that the student is also an active player in the process: what they bring to the construction of knowledge counts; and how effectively they construct it depends on how well they understand and interact with the field. Skills learned here build towards a case study in the final term which helps students to gain experience in preparing and researching an extended piece of coursework which serves a good preparation for the Dissertation/Investigative Study module at Level 6.
    Aims of the module:
    The module aims to allow the student to see and articulate connections between practice and critical approaches to study of music and the music industry. The module introduces students to the range of academic skills they need to produce a graduate-level dissertation, while encouraging them to articulate and take responsibility for the development of their own learning.
    The main aims of this module are:
    ● To encourage the student to think independently, select appropriate topics and produce examples of independent research.
    ● To help orient the student to engage with the main debates which operate within the music industry.
    ● To also develop the student’s awareness of cultural and aesthetic perspectives conversant with current debates across their subject area.
    ● To enable students to exercise that knowledge critically, in oral and written presentation.
    ● The module rehearses the thinking, historical, analytical, judgmental and discursive skills that are required to understand how practitioners work in the creative industries and as independent musicians.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Module brief:
    This module gives continuity to the work in Composing with Technology from Certificate level. On the first half, the analysis of reference works introduces a new music domain to be explored, and we expand our work into 20th century harmony, orchestration, and more contemporary popular repertories, establishing the link to a higher-level approach in music composition and production. The second part of the module is planned on the application of new concepts and materials onto practical projects in Live Electronics. Students will explore a variety of historical and contemporary approaches to the genre, investigating the techniques and aesthetics of computer generated live electronics.
    This Module consists of the following subjects:
    ● Critical listening & Analysis
    ● Music composition
    ● Harmony & Orchestration
    ● Approaches to Composing Improvisations
    ● Studio recorded/produced music
    ● Seminar discussions
    ● Live electronics
    ● Performance and Improvisation
    ● OpenSoundControl
    ● Analogue Electronics and Circuit Bending
    ● Electronics and Sensors

    At the end of this module the student will have completed two substantial pieces of work: a music composition and a live electronics project. In doing so, they will have travelled a journey through higher-level music composition and production processes, both individually and in collective practice.
    This module is generally taught over 30 weeks with formative assessment on Week 4 and two summative assessments on Weeks 14 and 29, followed by peer presentations and feedback sessions on Weeks 15 and 30. This is a core module for the Music Production pathway of BSc Music Technology and Production.
    Aims of the module:
    The module aims to extend students’ skills in working independently while at the same time developing their skills in working with others in groups. It will provide students with the experience of a live project aiming to integrate their understanding of their developing practice with wider issues and contexts. The module expands on addressing creative, technical and critical learning and skills in the field of music composition with access to a variety of contemporary technologies. It fosters their understanding of practice through learning from and with other students; learning to manage and plan their time effectively; and exploring the domain of acoustic and digital sounds.

    Read full details
  • Module brief:
    This practice oriented module gives continuity to the work in Introduction to Music and Sound for Media from Certificate level. In the first half, students will enhance their skills in sound design working on an audio/video post-production project focusing on the acquisition and manipulation (through editing and other post production techniques) of video and sound. Students will work in groups (of approximately 3 members) to produce a video piece of around 8 minutes in duration. It could be based on either an original or adapted story, or it could be an abstract video art project (each student will initially develop a script/proposal individually). The script/proposal should involve at least one actor (dancer/performer) and both interior & exterior scenes.
    The second part of the module will introduce the new subject of interactive arts — and it could unfold from concepts and materials originally used to produce the first audio/visual assignment. The focus will be on the package Max 7 (cycling74.com). From the basic programming with audio and video playback, to principles of controlling data flow, the basic sets of objects for processing numeric data, audio stream, and the Jitter matrix will be studied. This project considers the creativity of the inquiring student at its core for the investigation on innovative ways to manipulate sound and/or video in real-time. Students will have the option of working either individually or in pairs on this second project.
    At the end of this module the student will have completed two substantial pieces of work: a short film (or video art) and an interactive installation. In doing so, they will have travelled a higher-level journey through audio/video post-production and design and programming of interactive media, both individually and in collective practice.
    Aims of the module:
    The module aims to extend students’ skills in working independently while at the same time developing their skills in working with others in groups. It will provide students with the experience of a live project aiming to integrate the understanding of their developing practice with wider issues and contexts. The module expands on addressing creative, technical and critical learning and skills in the field of Sonic Arts with access to a variety of contemporary technologies. It fosters their understanding of practice through learning from and with other students; learning to manage and plan their time effectively; and exploring the domains of Sound for the Moving Image and Interactive Arts.

    Read full details

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The student undertakes an individual inquiry into a topic of their own choice and, based on this inquiry, develops an extended critical or investigative study. The module involves an initial training and preparation phase, conducted in group(s), in which an initial concept and plan are developed; this leads to supervised individual work, which is designed to support the student in becoming an independent investigator, building on techniques and knowledge developed at Levels 4 and 5. The module affords scope for individual initiative and development; it demonstrates the student’s ability to research a topic thoroughly, to use appropriate methods of investigation, and to work methodically and productively.
    The subject matter of chosen, which can be historical, cultural, theoretical, technical, or multidisciplinary, should be related to the student’s main field of study. Visual, audio, or other non-written material may form the subject of the enquiry, and may comprise an integral part of the final submission. The Dissertation may be professionally oriented and might include field-work; or it might be theoretical in its source material and methodology. An Investigative Study typically involves experimentation or other empirical research, resulting in the gathering and analysis of new data; it typically involves science or social science research methods, in contradistinction to arts and humanities methods associated with the dissertation; and, adopting modes of work and presentation characteristic of the sciences, it typically results in a somewhat shorter written document.
    Students may develop their Dissertation or Investigative Study topic within a particular Interest Group.

    This module aims:

    1. To provide a platform for ambitious individual work;
    2. To guide students in selecting and developing appropriate topics and engaging with current debates;
    3. To develop and manifest graduate levels of achievement across a range of professional and transferable skills;
    4. To afford a sophisticated instrument for exploring, testing, and presenting ideas at graduate level;
    5. To develop the student’s awareness of cultural, ethical, and aesthetic perspectives reflecting current debates in their subject area.
    6. To support development and deployment a range of investigative and analytical skills;
    7. To support the presentation of an argument as an integrated and coherent text.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    The module enables students to demonstrate their acquired knowledge and skills through a systematic and creative investigation of a project work, either individually or as part of a group, in accordance with their course requirements. The topic of investigation will cover a broad spectrum of various analysis and techniques and will lead to a comprehensive and concise academic/industry-related report. Students will be assisted in exploring areas that may be unfamiliar to them and encouraged to develop innovative ideas and techniques. Students will be able to choose a project that may require the solution to a specific problem, creation of an artefact in a real-world environment or an investigation of innovative ideas and techniques related to an area within their field of study. Collaboration with outside agencies and projects with industrial, business or research partners/ sponsors will be encouraged.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    Module Brief:
    The purpose of this module is to permit intellectual, practical and professional development at Level 6 of the skills, tools and methods of a professional-standard music technologist in the realms of Music Production and Sonic Arts, also working to help in the realisation of the Final Project in its parallel module FC6P01. Working independently, under supervisory guidance, students are encouraged to experiment, thus making them to think critically about different aspects of music technology and its relationship with their specific path in the field.

    This module offers Students the choice between year-long directive led “live” projects or a combined project with a short period of professional activity such as employment, a work placement, professional training, or volunteering in the not-for-profit sector.

    Aspects of work related learning (WRL) fill this module, developing the skills of professional practice in the sectors of Music Technology and so central to the module is a deep understanding of the student’s creative and critical practice in relation to future employment, self-employment, and other cultural contexts. Knowledge of these contexts will be gathered during the course at levels 4 and 5. This knowledge will be used to inform choices and decisions, quality and mode of presentation.

    Aims of the Module:
    ● Permit Level 6 students opportunity and capacity, under supervisory guidance, to consolidate the critical and practical knowledge and understanding needed to adequately conceive, plan and eventually realise major studio projects in their field of specialism within Music Technology, as an appropriate summation of their degree studies.
    ● Facilitate Level 6 achievement, thus equipping future-graduates for professional work in their chosen field within Music Technology and with the attributes of independence needed to effectively analyse and communicate the relevance of their work in context.
    ● Further extend students’ ability to present project proposals and reflective commentary to an advanced, graduate-level of understanding, demonstrating knowledge of relevant academic and professional contexts.
    ● Develop students’ abilities to a graduate-level, permitting to mature integration and understanding of critical, commercial, technical and creative processes and knowledge in parallel to the major Project being developed in their route of specialism within Music Technology.
    ● Enhance and extend their learning experience by applying and building on their academic skills and abilities by tackling real life problems in a professional working environment.
    ● Undertake a work-related project or training appropriate to their academic level.
    ● Gain a useful experience of the working environment and the career opportunities available on graduation.

    Read full details
  • Module brief:
    This module explores the sonic arts related sectors within the Creative Arts Industry with focus on areas of economic growth and sustainable employment. The students will learn about current UK and International markets and their contribution to the economy, research the same to identify key factors guiding the industry, and find ways to place their work as well as their Sonic Arts related skills within the industry. Through case-study research the module will focus on the practical issues in the Creative sectors including galleries, research centres, festivals and competitions, as well as commercial sectors of the industry such as film, performing arts, show business, marketing and sales, affording students with an understanding of the wide spectrum of Sonic Arts related sectors. With a clear employability focus, the module will provide students with transferable skills emphasising research, self-efficacy, and promotion in the contemporary globalised industry of arts and entertainment.
    At the end of this module the students will have gained a fresh perspective on the impact and value of the creative arts industry to the national and international economies. They will also have a better grasp of the essential skills needed to adapt and thrive in the continuously evolving creative arts sectors, and how to consolidate their careers within a fast-changing, globalised economy.
    This module is generally taught over 30 weeks with a midterm assignment on Week 15 and submission of the Case Study Project on Week 27. This is a core module for the Sonic Arts pathway of the BSc Music Technology and Production.

    Aims of the module:
    ● Identify areas of the Creative Arts Industry sectors and working environments, and explore career options available to them after graduation.
    ● Develop key skills in managing facts and figures relating to the Sonic Arts.
    ● Analytical review of case studies to recognise economic movements in critical areas, drawing on reference from Creative Industries Council (CiC), Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE), The Association of Sound Designers (ASD), publications such as The Wire, and The Arts Council England.
    ● To develop a range of professional, practical skill sets required to work in the fundamental sectors of the Creative Arts Industry.
    ● Learn the vital skills required to work in the Sonic Arts including: volunteering, freelance, distribution, marketing, sales, and live performance.
    ● Identify the value of the key Awards and Festivals in the Creative Arts Industry sectors including The Music and Sound Awards, MPSE Golden Reel Awards, CiC’s Createch, and The Prix Ars Electronica.
    ● Gain vital knowledge through industry visits, guest speakers, and conferences such as NIME International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    No module details available
    Read full details

After the course

This course is ideal if you’re just starting your career in music and media. You could go on to work in areas such as music production, sound recording, sound engineering and sound broadcast. Completing this degree will give you all the skills needed to work in composing, sonic arts or sound design.

You could also work in post-production, music for film, video editing, sound and music for games, as well as live sound such as sound for theatre, concerts and outdoor festivals.

What is a degree with foundation year?

This is a four-year degree course with a built-in foundation year (Year 0). It's the perfect route into university if you don't meet the necessary entry requirements for the standard undergraduate degree. You'll graduate with a full undergraduate degree with the same title and award as those who studied the three-year course.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Apply to us for September 2019

Applying for a full-time undergraduate degree starting this September is quick and easy – simply call our Clearing hotline on or complete our online Clearing application form.

UK/EU applicants for September full-time entry must apply via UCAS unless specified otherwise.

Applicants for September part-time entry should apply direct to the University using the apply online button.

Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September one year before the start of the course.

Our UCAS institution code is L68.

Visit UCAS for more details.

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