Why study this course?

Taught by our team of expert academics, this course is designed to  enable you to understand the challenges in global politics today, and to demonstrate how global issues can often have impacts close to home.

You will examine the complex relationships between states, the role of non-states actors, and how shifts in global power affect our daily lives. This includes the challenge to the West, climate change, nuclear proliferation, cyber conflict, the causes of war, terrorism, social justice, human rights, migration, and global inequalities.

Gain industry experience and build a rewarding career, where no two days are the same, with a degree in International Relations from London Met.

More about this course

On this International Relations BA (Hons) degree, you’ll examine major social and political issues in the world today, learn from a diverse team of academic experts and gain practical hands-on experience through a work placement. All of this will put you in the best possible position for an exciting career in international relations.

Our experienced lecturers will work with you to explore the major concepts of international relations – peace, conflict and diplomacy. You’ll then use this theory to explore your own areas of interests, which can be anything from the role of religion, to Middle Eastern politics, to foreign policy analysis, nuclear proliferation or intelligence agencies.

We place a huge emphasis on your employability, which is why we’ll encourage you to undertake a work placement as part of this course. Here’s where studying in the heart of London pays off: you can secure work experience at thinktanks, non-governmental organisations (think Amnesty International) or embassies. This aims to prepare you for the next step in your career journey, whether that’s in graduate employment or further study.

To help develop and deepen your understanding of international relations, shape your views, opinions and critical thinking, we regularly invite guest practitioners to share their experiences with students. Some of our past guests include US Congresswomen Donna Edwards and Elizabeth Esty, the Deputy Ambassador of Sweden, comedian and documentary maker Rich Hall who spoke to our students about the Cold War, and the Editor of On-Screen Content at Sky News who talked about Brexit. We also have an annual visit from Holocaust survivors, including Steven Frank BEM who was awarded the British Empire Medal in 2018 by Queen Elizabeth II for his services to Holocaust education.

During this degree, you’ll also learn about international relations beyond the classroom by visiting parliament, embassies, NGOs, local museums and art galleries. These visits will help solidify your understanding and the history of key issues such as power, race and gender.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed through individual and group presentations, case studies, coursework (including reports, research papers, briefing paper, essays, blogs and simulations) and a final-year dissertation or work placement.

We want you to achieve the best you can, which is why we’re on-hand for any support and guidance you may need throughout this three-year degree. 

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code L250
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades CCC in three A levels (or a minimum of 96 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our International Relations (including foundation year) BA (Hons).

These requirements may vary in individual cases.

We welcome applications from mature students who have passed appropriate Access or other preparatory courses or who have appropriate work experience.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Any university-level qualifications or relevant experience you gain prior to starting university could count towards your course at London Met. Find out more about applying for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL).

English language requirements

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. This course requires you to meet our standard requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2023/24 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

In historical perspective, the period since the end of World War II is very distinctive. Following the process of decolonisation, nearly every person in the world today resides in a sovereign state, in contrast to previous eras when different forms of political community coexisted. However, despite the uniformity of contemporary world politics, there are great variations across different regions, especially regarding the nature and dynamics of peace and conflict.

On this module you will explore the process of the dissolution of the European empires and examine the security dynamics left in their wake, focusing on the period since 1945. Through the study of key regions of the world, such as the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and South Asia, you will learn about the patterns of conflict which have emerged and how they have evolved, as well as identifying the key differences between security dynamics across the regions, concerning regional powers and the involvement of the global powers. You will also learn about the legacies of empire among the former imperial powers of Europe, which have come to form one of the more peaceful regions in the world.

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies - Monday afternoon
  • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

On this module you will explore the historical development of the international system since the end of the Second World War, focusing on the relations between the major powers in the international system, the conflicts they became embroiled in and their diplomatic efforts to contain or resolve them.

You will learn about the origins of the Cold War, how it developed and evolved and how it was brought to a peaceful conclusion, before moving on to examine the nature of the post-Cold War international system.

The module will introduce you to the application of some of the key concepts related to conflict, such as war, civil war and insurgency, nuclear deterrence, new wars and humanitarian intervention, as well as those relating to diplomacy, such as summit diplomacy and negotiation. You will also explore the role the United Nations has played in working to maintain international peace and security since 1945.

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies - Thursday afternoon
  • autumn semester - Monday morning
  • summer studies - Tuesday morning

This module introduces general debates in International Political Economy (IPE) about the relationship between politics and economics that shape our understanding of global issues and challenges. If focuses on how these global issues and challenges are addressed by relevant international actors and bodies and its consequences in terms of the distribution of global wealth and the persistence of inequality. Students will learn different theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of International Political Economy, the International Trade regime, and the main debates on International Development.

This module will provide students with introductory knowledge about the structure of global society with a focus on the economic dimension and the unequal distribution of wealth.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester
  • spring semester

Please check the Open Language Centre for confirmation of language level.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Monday morning

This module on Perspectives from the Global South introduces debates on global issues with a focus on inputs emerging from non-Western context. Are global issues understood similarly by the Global North and the Global South? The module will consist of an introductory part on understanding the notion of Global South with a critical discussion of the subfield of Area Studies. Then, the main content of module draws from empirical case studies to address global issues such as gender, migration, and climate change.

Students, who have already gained knowledge in the first semester on core general themes of International Relations, will familiarise with the complexity of the world context by widening existing debates with perspectives from the Global South. In so doing, students will be introduced to the problem of global inequality derived from processes of colonisation and decolonisation.

The aim of this module is that students will critically reflect on global issues by gaining an understanding of the realities and experiences of those who are marginalised or have less power to set global agendas.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Wednesday morning

The principal aim of the module is to introduce students to the discipline of Political Science. It aims to examine some of its key concepts and a series of institutions that students may already be reasonably familiar with as citizens.

You will explore the basic theories and methods associated with the study of politics and introduces students to key concepts such as the political system, political culture and participation. You will then examine some of the key institutions of politics including political parties; pressure and interest groups; legislatures and executives. Other elements of Political Science including state constitutions; political economy and public policy and management contribute to the variety of topics covered to give students a broad introduction to some of the subject matter of the discipline.

It is a core module at certificate level for BA International Relations, BA International Relations (with Foundation Year), and BA International Relations and Politics degree courses.

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies - Monday morning
  • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

The aim of this module is to introduce you to the study of International Relations as an academic discipline, enabling you to understand the development of the international system. You will consider some of the most important theories used in the study of international relations, and examine the development of the Westphalian system, the international political economy, and the role of transnational actors and international institutions.

The module will enable you to identify the key actors in the international system. You will consider the profound changes to the international system in the 20th Century, including two World Wars, the collapse of empires, and the Cold War, followed by the rapid pace and impact of globalisation and the challenges and benefits it created. The latter will include an examination of the current pushback against globalisation from nationalist movements and the possible return of Great Power politics in the 21st Century.

At the end of the module students should be able to make informed judgements about the evolution of the international system, current international affairs, and possible future developments.

Throughout the module students will be encouraged to explore how seemingly separate international relations theories, historical developments, institutional structures and events can impact on, and reflect, individuals’ lived experiences and how we are all part of the international system.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Monday afternoon

The broad aims of this module are to introduce you to some of the most important issues the international community faces and to enable you to think as problem-solvers and practitioners.

You will examine topics such as terrorism, race, gender, poverty, the environment, nuclear proliferation, migration, genocide, human rights and humanitarian develop. You will consider the impact of these issues at the local, national and international level.

You will explore how the forces of globalisation have influenced many of the issues that we will look at, and consider how there has been a push-back against globalisation with the rise of strong populist movements, the dislocation of the pandemic, and the alleged return of Great Power politics. At the end of the module students should be able to make informed judgements about current international affairs.


Throughout you will consider how these impact on your own lived experience as a global citizen.

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies - Tuesday afternoon
  • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

On this module you will be introduced to the main ideas underlying the study of politics focussing on discovering what are the dominant ideologies that have shaped politics and what are their principal contentions.

You will investigate the relationship between citizens and the state; the nature of the state; the principles of the main approaches to politics including conservatism, socialism, liberalism, anarchism, feminism, nationalism, and environmentalism; and the definitions and applications of rights and equalities.

Year 2 modules include:

How is knowledge produced in the discipline of Politics and International Relations? What are the main research methods, models and tools which are employed to investigate political actors, issues and phenomena? And what are the consequences from the choices which are made in these regards? These are the key questions which you will explore on this module.

The module sits at a key point in the degree journey for students of Politics and International Relations. It enables you to deepen your understanding of your course, by reflecting not just on the findings of research, but also on the relative strengths and limitations of the research methods employed, while enabling you to develop a proposal for an independent research project, which can be used as the basis for the final year project you will be required to undertake.

You will be introduced to the main methodological approaches in the discipline, such as the use of statistics, case studies, primary sources of information, big data analytics and interviews, as well as some of the more practical aspects of research design, such as defining a research question and compiling an indicative bibliography.

Through this module you will develop an appreciation for the various research methods and techniques employed in the discipline of Politics and International Relations; be able to reflect on the relative strengths and weakness of these approaches; develop key research skills relating to designing an independent project; and become more aware of the ethical and political issues with framing and undertaking research projects.

International Relations theory holds a central place in the discipline of International Relations. On this module, you will explore in depth and detail some of the most significant theories of world politics, which can be used to explain, understand or critique the nature and dynamics of the international system and how they condition the behaviour of states and other actors. You will explore both explanatory and critical approaches, the former seeking to explain how the international system operates, while the latter seek to transform the nature of world politics in one way or another.

A key theme running through the module is the tension between discipline and diversity. We will interrogate the theories on how open they are to alternative perspectives, interests and voices.

One of the central questions for the sub-discipline of International Relations is to explain the behaviour of states in the international system. The module approaches this question from the perspective of foreign policy analysis, focusing on the decisions, structures and processes primarily but not exclusively within states that potentially produce international action or inaction. It examines models of, and approaches to, foreign policy decision making and analyses national and supra-national foreign policy.

You will examine the nature of foreign policy and the concept of the national interest; analyse potential levels at which foreign policy decisions may be made and explore models and theories of decision-making using real world examples. You will also examine a series of case studies of a wide variety of states and supra-national organisations from different political systems.

By the end of the module you should have a range of competencies that would equip you to engage in analysis of any foreign policy decision, be that historic or contemporary.

Globalization is a complicated phenomenon influenced by politics, culture, law, and society. Advances in technology, communication, transportation, and trade have empowered globalization and will continue to fuel its growth creating a more closely interconnected world. The realities of globalization however, manifest regionally and locally in a symbiotic, dialectical relationship. The goal of the module is to examine that latter relationship using the lens of four major areas of contention and challenge in the global community. Students will be invited to engage these at the macro and the micro level, talking about how the entire human community is impacted or potentially impacted, and drawing on their own subjective and personal communal experiences of these to discuss and think about the effects in their home environments (wherever these might be on the globe)

The module is unique in that it focuses on giving students enrolled at London Metropolitan University the opportunity to work with students at the University of Nebraska-Omaha, engaging in an in-depth study and analysis of the four focused contemporary global and international issues. Students will exist in a ‘third space’ working together as partners, co-taught synchronously by an academic from each institution.

Students’ collaborative work will focus on creating projects focused on their collective ideas for potential solutions and ameliorative measures for those challenges that take into consideration global as well as local consequences.

We believe that the interpersonal relationships that the students will develop in the context of the module will equip them with a familiarity with alternative communicative styles and practices of other cultures and a better understanding of their own, essential assets for becoming a “global citizen.” Their interactions with one another will surface human cultural similarities and differences, thereby increasing students’ cultural awareness, competency, and self-confidence, and will reinforce the university’s goal of helping students to become global citizens.

English will the core official language of the course, however, every opportunity for students to engage in alternative languages in their collaborative work will be facilitated and encouraged.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Tuesday morning

The course offers students the opportunity to engage with a range of debates surrounding the politics of migration and diaspora studies in a variety of manifestations prevalent in the world in 20th and 21st centuries, combined with the rise of Nativist/Populist movements within the age of post-truth politics.

It looks at the present situation through a historical perspective, taking the current ‘refugee and migration crisis’ as a point of departure, and placing it in a global context. The module specifically focuses on the migration journey from departure to the country of residence, therefore from decision to migrate to diasporisation. The module will also scrutinise the rise of nativism in the shape of the populist far right promoting the interests of native inhabitants against diaspora groups, new citizens and cultural diversity.

Furthermore, the module will inform the students about large-scale refugee and diaspora population movements, and how such movements speak to issues of social justice, global inequalities, human and minority rights. Moreover, the social and economic consequences of migration on sending and receiving societies, as well as the different shapes of nativist opposition to migration and diasporas, will be discussed with different examples in various regions of the world.

The module is intentionally multidisciplinary and incorporates debates from international relations, history, sociology, anthropology, political science and geography. It seeks to answer a number of questions, including:

1. What are the effects of migration on both the states that receive immigrants and the states that send emigrants;
2. How policy-makers respond to these effects and why these responses vary from one country to another;
3. Are there similarities and differences between Nativist/Populist movements?

Students who wish to graduate with BA International Relations with Global Studies must take this module.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester
  • spring semester

Please check the Open Language Centre for confirmation of language level.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester

Please check the Open Language Centre for confirmation of language level.

On this module you will explore the practice of modern diplomacy. We will explore the historical emergence and evolution of diplomacy and the classic texts of diplomatic theory, before going on to concentrate on the roles and functions of traditional diplomatic institutions, systems and processes, such as embassies, foreign ministries, diplomatic services and international organisations.

This is a highly practical module. You will have opportunities to develop your abilities to write reports and negotiate, and interact with practitioners through visits to relevant institutions and/or practitioner classes.

This module will provide students with an overview of the issues and challenges faced by organisations seeking to build peace in the 21st-century. In doing so, it will explore the roles of international, state and non-state actors, and their relative strengths and weaknesses, including the United Nations, regional organisations such as the European Union and African Union, and NGOs. A crucial element will be exploring the political, economic and ethical dilemmas faced by such actors. It is a core module for the BA International Relations with Peace and Conflict Studies pathway.

Its aims are to examine:

• Some of the main institutions and organisations that work in conflict situations
• The varied objectives and methods of such organisations
• The differences between types of peace actors, including state and non-state
• Introduce some of the core practical skills for working in relevant peace and conflict fields, thus enhancing employability

This module will provide students with an overview of some of the major theories of and issues in contemporary peace and conflict. As such, it will examine the causes behind modern, 21st-century conflicts – including economic, political and social factors – as well as the major challenges to resolving conflicts and building peace, including in relation to areas such as gender and the environment. This is a core module for the BA International Relations with Peace and Conflict Studies pathway.

Its aims are to examine:

• Competing theories of peace and conflict
• The key concepts of peace and conflict
• The nature and causes of conflict in the contemporary era
• Some of the major challenges the world faces in seeking to resolve conflicts and build peace

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

On this module, you will develop your understanding of politics in the Middle East. We will focus on developments across the region and place them in the context of contemporary international relations. In particular, the module aims to: explain the processes by which the states and societies of the contemporary Middle East were formed; explore the main ideological currents that have influenced the political development of the Middle East, particularly those inspired by religion and nationalism; and examine the international relations of the region, focusing on the sources of conflicts and the difficult relationship between the West and the Middle East.

The module is required for students following the Global South pathway on the BA International Relations.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Wednesday morning

The broad aim of this module is to enable students to apply knowledge of strategy-making and strategic thinking as a historical practice to contemporary problems, critically exploring the enduring, present, and emerging issues present in the field of strategy.

On this module you will:

1. Examine the development of strategic theory and practise.
2. Consider how strategy can be applied by the study of significant case studies.
3. Examine the nature of strategy and how it relates to both policy and action in the 21st Century.
4. Explore non-Western perspectives to critique the Western centricity of strategic studies
5. Critically evaluate international, national, local and grass-root strategies applied to a number of issues, including terrorism, cyber conflict, the use of nuclear weapons, and the Civil Rights Movement.
6. Be encouraged to think as a practitioner and problem solver, developing your skills of critical enquiry by exploring the real-world impact of strategic debates.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
  • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

In this module you will have a broad introduction to sustainability, while:

1. Investigating environmental threats including the climate crisis, pollution, and the global biodiversity crisis;

2. Exploring political, social, technological and economic solutions to these problems;

3. Considering systemic environmental inequality along the lines of social class, race/ethnicity, gender and Intergenerationally.

On this module you will explore the practice of modern diplomacy. You will explore the main challenges posed to diplomatic practice by global change in recent decades: the rise of inclusive multilateral diplomacy in the UN and other fora; the increasing importance of non-state actors in contemporary diplomacy; the impact of faster air travel enabling leaders to conduct their own diplomacy; the revolution in information and communications technology; and innovations in diplomatic institutions (such as the emergence of the European External Action Service).

A key theme running through the module is the evolving nature of international negotiation, which will be illustrated through detailed case studies of environmental and trade diplomacy.

This is a highly practical module. You will have opportunities to develop your abilities to blog and use social media, engage in a simulated negotiation and interact with practitioners through visits to relevant institutions and/or practitioner classes.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Thursday morning

This module has three principal aims:
1. It will explore the historical origins of the EU and its predecessor bodies in the first two decades after WWII.
2. What agents and factors facilitated such a innovative development in European political history?
3. It will explore the political character of the Union. What sort of organisation is it in political terms? How democratic is it?
4. It will examine its principal policy outputs, including economic, monetary, social and foreign policies

The purpose is for students to gain a better understanding of the nature, inner workings, development, objectives and impact of a major regional organization which, since Brexit, is the biggest political, economic and military neighbour of the UK. This module thus not only helps students get a better sense of the EU, but also will allow them to understand better domestic political developments and the future course of economic and strategic policy of the UK, since these inevitably respond to developments in the EU.

In terms of applied policies, and especially the EU’s place in the world, the module will introduce students to critical perspectives concerning the rooting of European integration in post-imperial and post-colonial dynamics in European history after World War II, and invite them to reflect whether these still inform the EU’s actions and self-perception.

This is a module with a major professional payoff, not only in terms of developing crucial professional skills (research, writing etc.), but also in terms of introducing students to the workings of an expansive organization that provides many professional opportunities for politics graduates, whether in Brussels (for EU citizens) or in the UK for those analysing EU policies for government, think tanks, the private sector and universities.

Year 3 modules include:

Violence, civil wars, failed states, the proliferation of nuclear weapons, terrorism, climate change, mass migration, military invasions, cyber warfare, poverty and many other such words are rarely absent from the global media landscape. These phrases also seem to be a reflection of the world we inhabit today. They hint at the view that the use of force continues to be a key component of global politics but they are also an indication that non-military threats are increasingly challenging states and individuals. This increasingly broad range of threats has also challenged traditional theories and concepts of international security, and highlighted how this and the multifaceted structures of the international system are interlinked.

The module explores the conceptual and empirical meaning of security through a wide range of issues and topics ranging from the globalisation of crime, the impact of small arms, the role of intelligence to the impact of new technologies such as drones, the role that international collective defence organisations such as NATO play in global security, the challenges raised by mass migration, climate change and postcolonial ideas relevant to security.

The purpose is to investigate what these (and other) issues mean for security. It is clear that these problems must be solved by a means of a different set of policies, but the one thing they all have in common is that they are now all a function of security and therefore cannot be ignored.

The module will also encourage students to develop a range of important Generic Skills.

• The ability to communicate effectively in speech (the ability to work under pressure in seminars, where students must demonstrate the ability to respond to questions orally) and writing (writing an Essay and a Regional Report using commonly accepted standards of definition, analysis, grammatical prose, and documentation).

• The ability to work under pressure within specified time constraints, e.g., during seminar discussions and deadlines for all assessments.

• Research skills, including the ability to synthesise and analyse arguments, to read and understand texts on international relations, and to exercise critical judgement.

• The capacity to work independently, demonstrating initiative, self-organisation and time-management, as well as co-operating with other students to achieve common goals such as is achieved through group work during seminars.

Security studies is a crucial discipline that examines the causes and consequences of threats to national and international security. Theories play an essential role in this field as they provide a framework for understanding security issues, assessing threats, and developing strategies to prevent or manage them. Security studies theories provide a conceptual framework for identifying the root causes of security threats, analyzing their impact, and devising appropriate responses. They also help policymakers and practitioners to prioritize security challenges and allocate resources effectively. In essence, theories are the building blocks of security studies, helping to bridge the gap between academic research and practical policymaking. Without a solid theoretical foundation, security studies would be reduced to a collection of ad hoc responses to security challenges, lacking coherence and direction. Therefore, the study of security theories is crucial for anyone seeking to understand security challenges and contribute to their resolution.

A consideration of the wide range of threats that face states and individuals is a difficult task. The module, therefore, engages with how theoretical understanding of security has evolved in the past decades beginning with an emphasis on traditional state-military centric approaches to showcasing the critical, feminist, constructivist and postcolonial turn within the discipline.

These theoretical developments are illustrated by additional analysis of key themes including the role of international organisations responsible with stabilising the international system along with an analysis of key issues affecting humanity – such as climate change, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and why war and the use of force continue to be a key feature of global politics.

The module will also encourage students to develop a range of important Generic Skills.

• The ability to communicate effectively in speech (the ability to work under pressure in seminars, where students must demonstrate the ability to respond to questions orally) and writing (writing an Essay and a Regional Report using commonly accepted standards of definition, analysis, grammatical prose, and documentation).

• The ability to work under pressure within specified time constraints, e.g., during seminar discussions and deadlines for all assessments.

• Research skills, including the ability to synthesise and analyse arguments, to read and understand texts on international relations, and to exercise critical judgement.

• The capacity to work independently, demonstrating initiative, self-organisation and time-management, as well as co-operating with other students to achieve common goals such as is achieved through group work during seminars.

This module currently runs:
  • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

This alternate-core module providing a vocational and advanced undergraduate research element for Politics and International Relations courses aims to:

1. Enable you to gain a useful experience of the working environment.

2. Enable you to enhance and extend your learning experience by applying and building on your academic skills and capabilities by tackling real life problems in the workplace.

3. Provide you with an opportunity to design a research proposal relevant to your placement.

4. Allow you to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during your programme of studies.

5. Enable you to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.

6. Offer a medium for you to report upon your work placement experience.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Monday afternoon
  • spring semester - Monday afternoon

This module providing an advanced research element for PIR undergraduate courses aims to:

1. Enable you to demonstrate an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, and be able to apply analytical techniques, problem solving and project management skills.

2. Enable you to synthesise skills and knowledge and apply them successfully to complex issues.

3. Provide an opportunity for you to design a research project relevant to their degree.

4. Allow you to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.

5. Enable you to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.

This module currently runs:
  • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

This module providing an advanced research element for PIR undergraduate courses aims to:

1. Enable you to demonstrate an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, and be able to apply analytical techniques, problem solving and project management skills.

2. Enable you to synthesise skills and knowledge and apply them successfully to complex issues.

3. Provide an opportunity for you to design a research project relevant to your degree.

4. Allow you to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during your programme of studies.

5. Enable you to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

The module introduces you to issues of diversity, equality and rights; it is designed to broaden your knowledge of political practice (parties, elections, systems of government and law-making) and to add to your understanding of how international governmental and non-governmental organisations work.

You will be introduced to the concepts of gender and patriarchy, and to feminist political and IR theories; it will encourage you to develop informed criticisms of mainstream political and IR theories and practices

Students who wish to graduate with BA International Relations with Human Rights must take this module.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

On this module you will have the opportunity to challenge assumptions about the problems of contemporary Africa and its place in the world. In particular, the module aims to: examine the problems of African security and development through a broad approach, involving political, social and global perspectives; place Africa within the larger theoretical frameworks and approaches to international relations; encourage consideration of the relative responsibilities of Africans and those who promote or benefit from an unequal global system; and explore the complexities of problem-solving in this context. It will also consider the opportunities and challenges for African countries in the 21st Century.

This module will provide students with an overview of both the theory and practice of contemporary conflict resolution. It examines an array of conflict resolution mechanisms and strategies, including conflict prevention, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. It also explores a variety of concrete cases relating to modern, post-Cold War conflicts. This is a core module for the BA International Relations with Peace and Conflict Studies pathway.

Its aims are to:

• Examine a range of approaches to the cessation of contemporary conflicts and the conditions that may be necessary for peace.

• Explore the differing mechanisms and strategies for securing peace, including negotiation, mediation and arbitration.

• Focus upon both the domestic and international actors involved in these processes.

• Provide students with an understanding of relevant theories and empirical material for comparative analysis.

This module will provide students with an overview of both the theory and practice of contemporary conflict resolution. It examines an array of conflict resolution mechanisms and strategies, including conflict prevention, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. It also explores a variety of concrete cases relating to modern, post-Cold War conflicts. This is a core module for the BA International Relations with Peace and Conflict Studies pathway.

Its aims are to:

• Examine a range of approaches to the cessation of contemporary conflicts and the conditions that may be necessary for peace.

• Explore the differing mechanisms and strategies for securing peace, including negotiation, mediation and arbitration.

• Focus upon both the domestic and international actors involved in these processes.

• Provide students with an understanding of relevant theories and empirical material for comparative analysis.

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the concept and phenomenon of populism, perhaps the most talked-about topic in politics currently. is often used in a derogatory way to discredit opponents, while those considered as populists usually deny the characterization. Today, seemingly everybody and nobody is a ‘populist’.

Does it make sense to use this concept at all? How does populism help us understand important developments across the world–Trump, Brexit, Euroscepticism, the rise of Bolsonaro in Brazil and Modi in India? Although many associate populism with the far right and racist and patriarchal politics, can we also use populism to describe new modes of emancipatory mobilization like BLM protests? Is populism only an expression of ‘white angry men’ or can it be combined with feminism?

Populism is commonly associated with a divisive discourse, empty promises, reckless economic spending, personalistic leadership, and opposition to immigrants and international institutions like the EU. But contrary to these largely negative connotations of populism, there are other understandings in the literature that highlight its radical, emancipatory, democratic and inclusive character. Populism is also seen as a way to unite people ignored by the political system, and to challenge elites and vested interests.

The aims of the module are threefold:
- You will learn about the main understandings of populism in the literature, its different meanings and ways it is used in current political discourse.
- You will be able to see populism as a truly de-colonized global concept, going beyond West-centric perspectives of representative democracy
- You will learn about expressions of populism in all major world regions (Europe, Americas, Africa, Asia), developing important skills of comparative research.

You will be invited to kindly participate in critical reasoning and debate about human rights, and thereby to acquire and advance understanding of their nature and of their social and political practice. Reasoning and debate will be facilitated by lectures and (by your own reading of recommended) texts informing you of scholarship on the theory and practice of human rights, on their origin, on the ideal of their universality, on their imperfect institutionalization, and on the challenges facing their actualization in a world of injustice, rival cultural and ideological traditions, domestic populisms and international conflict.

Students who wish to graduate with BA International Relations with Human Rights must take this module.

The ongoing development and convergence of digital technologies in the 21st Century, creating a globally interconnected domain called cyberspace, has seen every aspect of modern society, from how we communicate to how we wage war, become cyberdependent. This has brought with it a number of benefits as well as vulnerabilities as the number of actors seeking to exploit cyberspace expands, ranging from individuals to small groups, non-state actors, and governments.

This module will explore how there are an increasing number of threats to national security that have evolved in cyberspace, from undermining democratic systems, disrupting commerce and industry, to attacks on critical infrastructure and military systems, including the changing nature of warfare, and the debate around what is meant by cyberconflict and cyberwarfare.

You will examine how there has been an almost exponential growth of information warfare as state and non-state actors seek to manipulate information to influence outcomes on the battlefield and in politics at all levels.

You will consider how digital information – who creates it, owns it, manipulates it, and how it is shared – has become contested terrain. This will include exploring how digital information has been used to both support and undermine democracy, blurring the boundary between what is fake and what is real, and how authoritarian governments link the potential of digital infrastructure to tools of societal manipulation and control.

You will also consider whether individuals have become the new commodity in this technological revolution, in an era defined as ‘the Age of Surveillance Capitalism’.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester

Please check the Open Language Centre for confirmation of language level.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester
  • spring semester

Please check the Open Language Centre for confirmation of language level.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

On this module, you will have the opportunity to explore in depth and detail the politics and international relations in Latin America. We will question the assumptions about contemporary Latin America as a region and its place in the world. In particular, the module aims to examine: the underlying political ideas and trends instrumental in shaping Latin American politics today, including the role of the USA; the internal politics of modern Latin American states and the role of these states within the region; the impact due to globalisation and the rise of political and economic importance of other developing regions; reflect on the complexities of problem-solving in this context.

As public opinion has been seen as increasingly influential and important in world politics, states and other international non-state actors have rediscovered public and cultural diplomacy, a form of diplomatic practice in which states engage with publics both abroad and at home. Due to changes in global information services, these forms of public diplomacy and statecraft are undergoing rapid change.

The module examines the changing nature of public and cultural diplomacy in the context of the evolution of global political communications. It explores competing definitions and interpretations of public and cultural diplomacy, along with how their practices have changed in recent decades, especially since the end of the Cold War.

The module employs a constructivist approach to facilitate student learning with a focus on authentic, context specific forms of engagement. Therefore, thematic topics will include an analysis of empathetic forms of communication along with matters of trust, cultural awareness, collective memory, and mutual forms of foreign policy making.

In studying this module, you will be encouraged in the classroom to use social media, multimedia and internet resources. This is complimented by students gaining experience of the nature of contemporary public diplomacy. You will attain knowledge of international political communication.

This module seeks to provide an understanding of contemporary South Asia by highlighting the region’s broad connections to other parts of Asia and the rest of the world. South Asia is a traditional regional division of Area Studies, but area studies approaches tend to consider regions as geographical spatial containers rather than as open zones characterised by constant exchange.

This module considers South Asia as a space which can be studied through the exploration of its connections to other places and regions. Apart from providing students with a knowledge of the main political developments in this region, this module attempts to contribute to a critical reflection on space and spatial configurations in international politics. The latter will be carried out by providing centrality to the study of socio-political developments from a South-South perspective with an emphasis on issues migration, borders and citizenship, and with a focus on ongoing political transformations.
This module aims at:

1. Provide students with a good understanding of main historical and political developments of the South Asian region since independence
2. To identify key regional issues and challenges that have consequences for global politics
3. To critically reflect on the nation state as a main actor in international politics by highlighting the political dimension of transnational linkages and relations
4. To widen students’ knowledge about politics of the Global South
Students who wish to graduate with BA International Relations with the Global South must take this module

As public opinion has become increasingly influential and important in world politics, states and other international non-state actors have engaged with publics both abroad and at home. Due to changes in global information services, these forms of strategic communication are undergoing rapid reforms in structure and content.

The module examines the on-going evolution of global political communications. It explores the nature of international political communication, evaluating key concepts such as propaganda, place branding, soft power and strategic communications, and the role of culture in world politics more broadly, including media such as film and the internet.

The module facilitates student learning through a constructivist approach with a focus on authentic, context specific forms of engagement. Through real-world scenarios, students will hone their skills as political communicators by cooperating with one another to address the complexities inherent in the international system. Therefore, thematic topics will include an analysis of empathetic forms of communication along with matters of trust, cultural awareness, collective memory, and mutual forms of foreign policy making.

In studying this module, you will attain knowledge of strategic international political communication.

What our students say

"My BA was an eye opener and an activator tool to help me acquire relevant knowledge in connection with peace and conflict studies, such as mediation and advocacy skills. In my view, the course materials were just outstanding.
"The feeling of belonging, a sense of community is the best thing about London Met."
– Marie-France Nguo

“Studying at London Metropolitan has without a doubt been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.
“The academic quality has exceeded my expectations with great debates and continual support from my teachers, which has made me feel confident about and well-prepared for the future.”
– Kimie Frengler

“I was very impressed by the high quality teaching London Met offered. Lecturers were very knowledgeable and were great communicators, presenting complex subjects in interesting ways.
“I also learnt a lot from fellow students from all over the world. I found it very helpful to study international issues with people from the countries we were discussing as they shed new light on situations.”
– Jacquelyn McCarthy

Where this course can take you

This International Relations BA degree will prepare you to hit the ground running in a range of different organisations and roles. 

Graduates have found positions with organisations involved in local and national government, including the UK Cabinet Office, security services, national diplomatic services across the world, regional organisations, aid and development agencies, and international businesses.

The programme is also excellent preparation for further study or research. High numbers of our graduates have embarked on postgraduate courses at prestigious higher education institutions both in the UK and around the world.

Important information about this course

We're committed to continuously improving our degree courses to ensure our students receive the best possible learning experience. Many of the courses in our School of Social Sciences and Professions are currently under review for 2023-24 entry. We encourage you to apply as outlined in the how to apply section of this page and if there are any changes to your course we will contact you. All universities review their courses regularly and this year we are strengthening our social sciences and professions courses to better reflect the needs of employers and ensure you're well-equipped for your future career.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK applicant wanting to study full-time starting in September, you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified. If you're an international applicant wanting to study full-time, you can choose to apply via UCAS or directly to the University.

If you're applying for part-time study, you should apply directly to the University. If you require a Student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.



When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

To find out when teaching for this degree will begin, as well as welcome week and any induction activities, view our academic term dates.

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