Fashion Marketing and Journalism - BA (Hons)

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Why study this course?

This undergraduate degree gives you the opportunity to study with experienced journalists and marketeers in the heart of London’s buzzing fashion scene. As industry experts, they’ll help you develop all the skills, knowledge and contacts you need for a career in fashion journalism. You’ll also gain first-hand experience of the industry during a work placement with some of the leading names in fashion marketing and journalism.

In the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of all 2017 graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

Keep up-to-date with the latest news from our journalism staff, students and alumni by following their Instagram and Tumblr pages (Instagram handle: londonmetjournalismofficial), you can also follow their Twitter page.

More about this course

This degree course is designed to give you an in-depth understanding of the fashion industry and help you develop the writing, broadcasting and multimedia communication skills you need to forge a successful career. You’ll cover all aspects of the industry, from historical and theoretical backgrounds of journalism to international fashion strategy. You’ll also gain a solid grounding in media law – vital for a career in journalism - as well as first-hand knowledge of how the fashion business works.

Taught by practicing journalists and skilled marketers in the vibrant heart of London, you’ll gain all the skills required to write compelling academic essays, analyse and present marketing strategy and curate your own fashion blog.

To expand your skills, you’ll also undertake a work placement where you’ll develop the practical experience and industry contacts you need to get a head-start in your career. In addition, you'll discover what working in the industry is really like during "news" days, as you’ll practice working under the same pressure as media professionals. You'll also have the opportunity to develop your skills and study abroad, thanks to our partnership with a number of international universities.

On graduation, you’ll leave with all the relevant knowledge and skills you need for a career in fashion marketing and journalism. For more information, visit the Holloway Express, our independent news website run by London Metropolitan University’s journalism students. Alternatively, check out our Tumblr blog for news from staff, students and alumni of London Metropolitan University’s journalism subject area.

Assessment

A variety of assessment tools will be used to gauge your performance, including reports, essays, exams, group work and individual portfolio work.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code NP5M
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • GCSE English at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Media and Communications Extended Degree.

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module provides an introduction to the discipline of fashion/beauty through analysis and understanding of a range of social, practical and theoretical issues, studying how history has shaped today’s fashion & beauty media and marketing industry. It is suitable for those on all fashion-related courses.
    Looking at fashion in a UK and international context, the module will outline the economic, social and historical significance of the fashion & beauty industry alongside an understanding of terminology, product life cycles and the industry’s seasons. The module aims to develop cultural and commercial understanding of the industry through exploration of case studies, trends, sustainability and global contexts. Students will be enabled to understand how fashion and beauty has evolved and how careers within it are constantly evolved.
    Taught through a mixture of lectures, practical workshops, site visits and guest speakers
    Assessment will be through multimedia group presentation, group coursework, individual coursework and tutor-moderated self-reflection.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module introduces students to the history of journalism, honourable and dishonourable, to the roles it has played and continues to play in society, and to the main theories used to understand how it works. Focusing on the UK, it will also highlight ethical concerns and take account of wider, global issues and contexts. This content will be used to develop transferable skills of critical thinking and analysis, crucial to employability.
    Political accounts, investigations which have transformed lives, human interest stories, arts reviews, in-depth profiles, cartoons, speculative columns, hot gossip, sports, fashion, celebrity… and now, for something completely different! What does it all mean and why do we produce and consume it? By the end of the module, students won’t necessarily have any answers, but they should be able to ask much better questions and have developed critical and analytical skills.
    Working together, individually and in small groups, students explore major events and stories, past and present. They develop skills of presentation and analysis, learning when to use academic writing and when the more vivid narrative of journalism can play an equally effective role. In addition, they will explore critically and practically, the techniques used in writing and broadcasting of the past so that they can better develop their own professional capacities in the future.
    Discussion, presentations, research, screenings and visits will all play a part in the development of critical thinking skills, which will be workshop-based.
    The module will be assessed by three essays and contributions to an online journal, which is moderated by tutors at the end of the year.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module introduces students to the practical and analytical skills (including looking at ethical problems) involved in professional news writing, newsgathering, collaborating in teams to produce stories, evaluating sources and revising writing.

    Students will be required to produce news copy in professional formats, which will include online posts using images, video and audio and the use of mobile technology.

    They will research and write a series of news articles and publish them to the class.They will learn newsgathering skills: analysis of reports, press releases and user-generated content; deducing news content from press conferences and announcements (diary items); following up human interest via face-to-face and phone interviews, including vox pops and the death knock; organising a team response to a major event; follow-up stories and case studies; analysing facts and figures to use in sidebar boxes; cultivating contacts and FoI.

    They will study contemporary news coverage to develop an understanding of how news stories are reported and created. They will discuss ethical, legal and commercial constraints on journalists and how different genres serve different markets.

    Accuracy, subediting, headlines and search engine optimisation will be important, as will developing stories through new media, images, audio, and video. This to include links to Youtube, soundcloud etc, with multimedia elements.

    The module will be assessed by two portfolios, using mixed media, and a timed class exercise. These will test students’ developing news sense, news gathering and news writing.

    Contribution in class will be measured by a journal recording the student’s activity, weekly updated, moderated by tutors at the end of the teaching period

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday morning

    The module introduces students to the study of marketing and communications. It outlines the fundamental principles, concepts and techniques, which are essential to understanding marketing in the 21st century as a philosophy of business in different environments. It provides students with the opportunity to explore contemporary marketing theories and approaches and the body of knowledge required for marketing decision-making based on the application of the marketing mix.

    The module aims to:
    1. Critically evaluate the holistic marketing concept and its impact on the marketing mix of products and services, with a view to creating superior customer value.
    2. Explore how changes in our modern society including cultural and rapid technological advances have created new challenges and opportunities for all organisations.
    3. Develop knowledge of a wide range of theoretical and practical techniques used in marketing and communications.
    4. Assess how to employ marketing theories, techniques and tools in solving business and marketing challenges across a range of organisations.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module is for all students on fashion and journalism related courses. It is both practical and theoretical, developing an awareness of how branding is used across manufacture, retail and media and of how employment clusters around branding.
    Thus, it is aimed at advancing practical marketing and communications skills as well as knowledge and critical understanding. Students will examine consumer and reader behaviour in relation to branding, considering tools, psychology and strategy in the marketing communications mix. Site visits will help understanding of the industry, while social media will be mined to understand how brands and audiences change in synergy. Serious issues about diversity and sustainability will challenge notions of brand identity and market share, enabling students to understand employment within its global contexts.
    Assessment will be through multimedia group presentation, a major group project, individual coursework and tutor moderated self-reflection.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module covers what student journalists need to know about how Britain works and the place of journalism within debates about ethics and the legal system. It is core for all journalism-related courses as everyone in the media needs to know how the system works.

    Classes will look at the ethical and judicial frameworks and constraints which control the reporting of legal matters, including crime and its contexts. Students will explore these subjects from the industry viewpoint, learning how to find and develop stories within the social and political landscape of Britain today.

    Within public administration, classes will survey: national systems of government and representation; local government; citizen remedies and freedom of information; foreign policy, the EU and defence; social services and education; health; the judicial system (civil) and human rights; emergency services; the criminal justice system, including police; finance and the stock exchange.

    At the heart of this course is the study of ethics. How journalists ought to behave – and what we can learn from those who do not behave properly – is particularly important to the profession. The public relies on the profession to give information. How should journalists get that information and how convey it?

    Ethics gives a deeper meaning to the study of the legal system for journalists. Classes will locate the law which journalists need to know, both civil and criminal, within a broader ethical framework in today’s multi-platform, multi-national world. Analysis of current cases and case law will be as important as knowledge of existing frameworks and codes.

    Field trips to magistrate’s courts and local authority meetings will be key to personal experience and understanding, as will guest speakers.

    Discussion, research, screenings and visits will all play a part in developing students’ critical thinking skills and the professional skill of accurate, legally acceptable writing.

    The module will be assessed by two portfolios (one of which includes multimedia), an essay, and an online journal moderated by tutors at the end of the year.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Students will work in teams in the newsroom to produce multi-platform journalism consistent with industry practice. This module is core for journalism students and many allied courses.

    Working within tight deadlines and adhering to professional codes and standards, students will write and edit copy and scripts, headlines and picture captions and learn how to use words, images, graphics, audio and social media to construct narratives appropriate to the story and platform. They will develop competencies in the use of audio and video recording and editing, making particular use of smartphones, and learn how to draw traffic to their work by means of social media.

    In order to perform these tasks, students will take on a number of roles specified in published job descriptions. Students will be required to produce CVs, covering letters and portfolio websites displaying their own work, appear before an interview board and pitch story or programme ideas to commissioners. This will develop their social as well as writing skills.

    The development of students’ professional practice will be informed by sessions led by guest speakers from the industry and field trips to working news environments.

    The second half of the course will involve four six-hour long news days, which will offer chances to transform understandings into practice.

    Successful completion of this module will involve the preparation of journalism and employability portfolios to be developed for presentation to prospective employers.

    Assessment will involve three portfolios of journalism, and an employability portfolio.
    Contribution to news days will be both self-assessed and moderated by tutors.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module provides opportunities for students to gain experience of the journalistic working environment and to enhance and extend their learning by applying and building on their academic and journalistic skills. It is core for all journalism-related courses.
    Students must find their three –week placement themselves, deploying employability and professional skills and their own developing portfolios. These will be measured and supported by the assessments.
    Placements will be supported by a session of workshops, of which students must attend the majority.
    Assessment will be by a reflective learning log, including ethical considerations and remarks by employers; a presentation to class and on the class blog; self-assessed engagement with classes when not on placement, measured by online journal.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module enables students to undertake a short period of professional activity either part-time/vacation employment; work placement; not-for-profit sector volunteering or a professional project led by an employer.

    The work related learning activity must be for a minimum of 105 hours. These hours can be completed in a minimum of 15 working days (based on 7 hours per day) full-time during the summer, or over a semester in a part-time mode. The activity aims to: enable learners to build on previous experience and learning gained within academic studies and elsewhere; provide opportunity for personal skills and employability development and requires application of subject knowledge and relevant literature. Learners will be supported in developing improved understanding of themselves, and the work environment through reflective and reflexive learning in reference to the Quality Assurance Agency Subject Benchmark Statements for the appropriate degree programme.

    Students will be contacted prior to the semester to ensure they understand requirements of securing work related activity in advance. Support is provided to find and apply for suitable opportunities through the Placements and Careers teams. The suitability of the opportunities will be assessed by the Module Team. Learners may be able to utilise existing employment, providing they can demonstrate that it is personally developmental and involves a certain level of responsibility. It is a student's responsibility to apply for opportunities and engage with the Placement and Careers team to assist them in finding a suitable role.

    The module is open to all Business and Management undergraduate course programmes (for semesters/levels, see the appropriate course specification.)

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module seeks to provide a motivational learning experience and to stimulate the co-creation of knowledge pertaining to the fashion buying/merchandising processes and the manner in which these two poles of commercial practice link together through (global) supply chain networks. The module content addresses the various roles and responsibilities of these important players operating at all levels of the fashion business, from retailers of quotidian apparel through to couture labels. Discussion and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative approaches to fashion buying and merchandising are designed to raise awareness of the inter-relationships between maximising profitability and meeting consumer expectations in the fast-changing fashion business environment. The key skills of research, numeracy, analytical thinking, problem-solving, visual communication, academic reading & writing are mobilised in completing a diverse suite of assessment tasks predicated on the module’s constructively aligned learning outcomes. The module exploits material disseminated earlier in the programme as academic scaffolding in order to provide students wishing to develop careers in the fashion business insights into commercial realities of the apparel sector

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    The fashion industry operates in a dynamic environment resulting in a rapid expansion of fashion internet retailing. Increasingly consumers are switching between channels in their purchasing of Fashion. The module will deal with a range of theoretical, practical techniques in understanding and researching the management of fashion etailing. The module examines the various factors which influence on line customer journey, trends in multichannel approaches and strategies.
    This module has been designed to build on level 4 knowledge with a focus on the understanding of the management of fashion etailing. This module aims to develop a critical understanding of the importance Internet retailing and its contribution to Fashion retailing.
    The module aims to:
    • Develop an understanding and demonstrate the scope of digital retail issues both operationally and theoretically in designing and implementing successful internet retailing strategies.
    • Enable and develop student’s technical skills and knowledge in applying market research methods using appropriate digital metrics.

    The module also aims to assist students in the acquisition of the following skills:
    1. Digital literacy and IT skills
    2. Researching & analysing
    3. Inter-personal/Inter-cultural communication
    4. Application of knowledge

    Read full details.
  • Online and digital journalism skills are becoming essential for the industry and other media activities. New job roles are created for community managers and social media editors to increased vacancies for other new areas such as data journalism.

    Anyone studying journalism needs to understand the challenges and opportunities posed by the data economy and the power of social media.

    This module equips you with the learning to critically understand social media for audience feedback, community development, story development, and understanding analytics: how analytics are used to build audiences and how this data influences editorial decisions.

    It will also teach the basics of data journalism, starting with spreadsheets and making sense of statistics, newsroom maths and storytelling using free visualisation tools. This module will introduce you to what you need to master in order for you to work in a professional capacity as a digital journalist.

    This module will combine teaching the technical skills with an introduction to software tools – including understanding HTML embedding and writing for online and using free software such as datawrapper, Tableau, Tineye, Hootsuite and more.

    Some programming knowledge or blogging experience will be useful, as well as skills with graphics, but the main aim of the course will be to understand the principles of social media, what works for online and telling meaningful data journalism stories. Ethical concerns will be highlighted throughout, looking at verification and fake news, looking at web tools like webarchive.org, checking IDs and images.

    The module will be assessed by timed in-class assessments, an investigative portfolio using sources, and entries to an online journal, moderated by tutors at the end of the teaching period

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module offers an introduction to styling within fashion journalism and related industries, underpinned by an understanding of the relationship between the media and industry, surveying the cultural and global business issues which fashion journalists must understand. Merchandising and trend-spotting will be examined along with the role of the stylist in media and marketing. It will be helpful to anyone studying fashion marketing, beauty marketing and journalism.

    Weekly assignments will explore different arenas for and types of styling, developing employable skills in sourcing and resourcing looks and products for writing, photography, retail, events, blogging/vlogging, trends and catwalk shows, and new media networking. These will be discussed in class and reflectively via online journal.

    Summative assessment will join these strands and take the form of a major styling project, focusing on a specific fashion business, event, publication or store, chosen in consultation with the module teaching team.

    Assessment tasks will be: a portfolio of five short pieces (no more than 300 words each, with images for each); a final piece of up to 1,000 words which creates an original story with 10 self-created images (or can be video of 2 minutes), with an analytic log of research and sourcing (up to 1,000 words); and engagement with class, assessed through self-reflective journal.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    The last two decades has witnessed fundamental changes in the way in which people do business and communicate, socially and formally. A significant contributor to this phenomenon has been the introduction of the internet and social on-line sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Youtube as well as media/TV, MTV etc. Technological advancements have made the possibility of downloading music, videos, film an everyday feature. In terms of business and trading, there has been significant development in knowledge as a traded commodity and coupled with the internet, the ability to do business on a global scale has become an expected aspect of business.

    The way in which information is acquired, stored and protected has raised issues in relation to the existing boundaries of law and in some instances the development of new legal issues particularly in the area of intellectual property, contracts, privacy, Twitter and super injunctions.
    Information, creativity and access to knowledge has changed exponentially and as a consequence of these developments, protecting information, knowledge has become an essential element for businesses of all forms including the creative and consumer industries such as media, fashion and retail in particular as well as individuals. The legal issues raised have areas of commonality across these industries.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Students will work in teams in the multimedia newsroom to research, write and present multi-platform journalism, specifically in video and audio formats. The module is key for journalism and fashion marketing and journalism students, providing essential skills for today’s workplaces.

    Working to specified job descriptions, students will take on responsibility for the editorial and production processing and use knowledge to spot and prepare stories for forward planning diaries, with due regard to ethical and professional considerations.

    Student will work to tight deadlines and adhere to professional codes and standards during editorial cycles, which will periodically be explored in four newsdays and in two newsweeks. These will develop employability and focus around industry practices, including news conferences, bulletins and multimedia links.

    Students will be given the opportunity to work in specific professional genres (news, features, sport etc) or specific media (audio, video, newspaper, online). They will write, subedit and re-version copy for different platforms and purposes. They will use mobile technology and social media to enhance news values.

    Students will be encouraged to develop a contacts book and to publish work in professional publications, as well as on the course website. Language, writing and presentation styles will be developed to match or improve on contemporary industry practice.

    Through tutor coaching they will improve skills such as video, audio and copy editing, writing and editing copy and scripts, headlines and picture captions and learn how to use words, images, graphics, audio and social media, including tweeting, to construct narratives appropriate to stories and platforms. News weeks will develop team working and technical proficiency.

    Student development will be informed by sessions led by guest speakers from the industry and field trips to working news environments.

    Assessment will involve three portfolios of journalism. Engagement with class will be self-assessed and moderated by tutors.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    Creating Packages is core for journalism-related courses. It develops the advanced professional skills taught at level 5: identifying subject matter and potential readerships, research, interviewing and editing techniques, on-the-spot reportage, and finding original angles and relevant sources for stories, to a stage where students originate and source the elements for their own journalism packages, based on a subject area of their own choice, rather than as directed by tutors. This is an exciting chance to create your own magazine in print and online.

    Each package will have three instances, in print and online (or vice versa), to reflect the multimedia nature of such products in contemporary journalism. News days will reinforce a professional sense of urgency and the need to meet deadlines.

    The module allows students to enhance their skills in writing news features arising from topical issues, using data for feature articles, developing more in-depth interviews and/or feature stories based on interviews and research. Students will be directed towards identifying subject matter and potential readerships, on-the-spot reportage skills, and finding original angles and relevant sources for their stories. Students also learn design, lay-out and multimedia skills.

    Assessment will be of three portfolios of work, adapted for printed text and for online; two critical, self-reflective commentaries; an individual feature; and contribution to class, self-assessed through journals where students will self-assess their own work, their editorial roles and their participation in group contributions to class, including group and individual oral presentations (where attendance is mandatory). This will be moderated by tutor.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module provides the student with the opportunity to work independently on a project relevant to fashion journalism. The project will take the form of an in-depth study of a critical issue in the fashion industry, to be agreed with the tutor. Students work closely with their supervisor. It offers an exciting way to make an area of expertise all your own, whilst developing both journalistic and academic communication skills.
    This module is core for Fashion Marketing and Journalism students.
    Assessment will be made through an oral presentation with written script, a critical essay, a literature review and a piece of longform journalism, which can be written (5-6,000 words) and broken into shorter pieces, or radio, TV or multimedia.
    A three-hour refresher session on law will prompt attention to legal constraints.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module allows students to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, arising out of previous study and subject to supervisor approval. It offers an exciting way to make an area of expertise all your own, whilst developing both journalistic and academic communication skills.

    It must be a piece of longform journalism, aimed at a specified audience, not a study of journalism. It can be in any journalistic medium.

    Independent but supported learning and sustained research and writing will provide a focus for refining and drawing together a wide range of transferable skills.

    These must result in a high quality piece of journalism with an academically rigorous critical and research underpinning.

    A synopsis and project management schedule, demonstrating a research strategy submitted at week 8, will provide a signpost for further work. A three-hour refresher session on law will prompt attention to legal constraints.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    Fashion Project is a core specialist module for the BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing and Business Management programme. It aims to support students in becoming independent researchers able to apply theories, concepts and methodological tools to primary source material. The module content covers all the key requirements for undertaking an original piece of academic research over an extended period. The initial teaching block supports students in identifying an appropriate topic and in planning the research process – introducing the range of research methodologies and explaining the various elements of a dissertation required by academic convention. After determining where their interests lie, students are allocated a supervisor possessing specialist knowledge of the arena. It is likely that students will use the first of an entitlement of up to six meetings over the remainder of the module to discuss the production of the unmarked research proposal. After this proposal is ‘signed-off’ students embark on the research journey, scheduling meetings for advice and guidance as and when appropriate. It is recommended that students consult their supervisors after completing the literature review, during the data collection and analysis of findings stages, but reserve the final, if not also the penultimate, meeting for the writing-up stage prior to submission in the final teaching week.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    Arts Journalism investigates and teaches the specific professional techniques and practices of arts journalism – in music, film, literature, art, architecture, dance, theatre, and other areas of student interest which relate directly to employability. Throughout this 15-week module, the arts are placed in the context of the relationship between journalist practitioners (in print, radio and online) and the arts industries. It is suitable for anyone wanting to explore these areas.

    Field trips and guest speakers will demonstrate in depth the connection between professional journalists and arts practitioners.

    This module also surveys the cultural, historical and global business issues and conditions within which arts journalism takes place, enabling self-reflective and critical perspectives.
    Students are encouraged to publish their work inside the university website and outside, building up contacts and a portfolio of pieces.

    Students are assessed through a portfolio of practical and critical work, which can be across platforms, a diary of their critical reactions to arts events, and a final 1,000-word piece of arts journalism.

    Class participation will be assessed through contribution to an online journal.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    This module develops skills in and critical understanding of writing and reporting on fashion across multiple platforms including magazines, blogs, social media and video content. It is suitable for anyone interested in developing skills for this fast-growing sector of the communications industry.
    Looking at the latest trends and influence in the industry, and covering editorial and commercial case studies, students will develop working skills in fashion journalism, blogging, PR, broadcasting and photography. Taking advantage of our location, the module will feature site visits and participation in a fashion news week, with involvement in planning and running events.
    Assessment will be through group presentation, a portfolio of work, a video and presentation, fashion blog project and tutor-moderated self reflection, using online journal.

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  • This module looks at the fashion industry within a global context. It is suitable for everyone interested in how fashion works internationally, and offers the chance to acquire skills in analysis, presentation and communication in the fashion business.
    It covers global supply chains and retailing, international branding and marketing communications and strategic decisions made by international fashion retail businesses. The module covers the biggest challenges - financial, political, ethical and sustainable - facing global fashion business. It also provides an overview of the international business concepts, frameworks and theories that form an understanding of global fashion strategy.
    Assessment will be made through group presentation, strategic group project, individual coursework and tutor moderated self reflection, via online journal.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    The module seeks to provide a motivational learning experience and to stimulate the co-creation of knowledge pertaining to the range of issues arising from the development of a globalised fashion market. The module content addresses the impacts of both the apparel production processes and the practices of fashion (over-) consumption in economic, environmental and ethical contexts. Discussion and analysis of the financial imperatives of offshore production, identification of trends in consumer behaviour, and the connectivity underpinning strategic marketing initiatives are the methods used to raise awareness of new consumer markets, new production techniques and new communication platforms. The key skills of academic reading & writing, analytical thinking and self-directed research are mobilised in completing a diverse suite of assessment tasks predicated on the module’s constructively aligned learning outcomes. The module builds on material disseminated earlier in the programme as academic scaffolding, constructing a holistic overview of the apparel business that provides potential entrants to the job market with the knowledge and transferable skills that employers expect of Fashion Marketing graduates.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

What our students say

"London Met's Fashion Marketing and Journalism course provided me with invaluable copywriting and research skills along with a solid understanding of the UK media landscape and fashion industry which I was able to successfully apply to a range of diverse work experiences in fashion PR and digital communications."

Gaia de Siena, 2013

"My fashion marketing and journalism degree is very unique, a lot of universities don't combine these two subjects. This impresses my employers as it's an unusual and impressive combination of subjects. It's great to understand and be able to analyse each and every brand you come across - who their target audience is and why they position themselves in a certain way. There's a reason behind every campaign and move etc. The journalism side has taught me how to approach publications when pitching story ideas, which has led to articles being published as well as being the Fashion Editor of my own online magazine (Navy Magazine) with fellow London Met Journalism students!"

Laura Allbones, 2016

After the course

During this degree, you’ll gain the qualifications and skills you need for a range of roles in fashion journalism, newspapers and magazines (both print and online), including careers as a fashion critic, fashion reporter and fashion writer.

Work placements

You’ll also have the chance to develop your practical skills through a hands-on work placement. These can be organised via our specialist Career Development and Employment Service.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

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How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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