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Film and Television Studies - BA (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Entry requirements Modular structure After the course How to apply Meet the team Visit us

Why study this course?

You'll gain a strong understanding of the film and television industry and its significance across the globe. Through practical learning you'll develop an array of transferrable skills, preparing you for a huge choice of roles in the cultural industries or for further study.

The course shares a common first year with our Film and Television Production BA, which covers essential knowledge of the film and television industry and basic audio-visual skills. You'll specialise in academic, historical and cultural analysis of film and television.

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More about this course

Recent graduates have gone on to study master's degrees at King's College London or take on roles in organisations including Netflix, Curzon Cinemas, the British Film Institute (BFI) and a variety of production companies including Graham Norton’s So Television.

Our Film and Television Studies teaching staff are internationally renowned experts in their field. Widely published, Dr Karen McNally specialises in Hollywood cinema and American television, has collaborated in international research projects and spoken about Hollywood cinema on Channel 4, BBC Radio and at the British Film Institute. Dr Leila Wimmer specialises in French cinema and is also widely published. Her work includes a monograph and essays in a variety of journals and edited volumes.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a variety of coursework and in-class assignments. These will include essay plans, summaries, presentations, textual analysis, essays and screenplays.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code P302
Entry requirements View

This course is subject to validation.

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Entry requirements

In addition to the University’s standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBC in three A Levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg Advanced Diploma).
  • Application for production students may include a compulsory interview and/or portfolio submission.

Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate Access or other preparatory courses or have appropriate work experience.

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Monday morning

    Module Code:
    Module Title: Approaches to Film and Television
    Description: This module investigates key approaches to the study of film as an academic discipline.
    It will introduce students to a broad range of theories, encompassing such topics as authorship, genre theory, star studies, historical poetics, film style, theories of spectatorship and psychoanalysis, feminist film theory, developments in audience studies and cultural studies. The module will examine a variety of theoretical approaches to film In addition, the module addresses issues of film style, enabling students to develop skills of textual analysis.
    Teaching Period: Year Long (30 weeks)
    Assessment: Textual analysis in-class test (20%), Evaluation (30%), Essay (50%)

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  • No module details available
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  • No module details available
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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday afternoon

    Module Code:
    Module Title: Film and Television Histories
    This module introduces students to the history of film and television from 1895 to the present.
    It explores key developments, movements and trends in countries such as Britain, Italy, France, Japan, Germany, Sweden and America, including the ‘cinema of attraction’; the emergence of narrative cinema; stardom; the development of the sound film; film as propaganda; the Hollywood studio system; animation and European art cinema. Specific case-studies and examples will be used to examine the history of film and television within broader cultural, industrial, political and social contexts. Attention is primarily given to feature films, but documentary and experimental films in both feature and short-film length will also be screened and considered. 
    Teaching Period: Year Long (30 weeks)
    Assessment: Group presentation (20%), bibliography (30%), essay (50%)

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Year 2 modules include:

  • No module details available
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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module will examine a variety of European, including British, films in relation to their specific cultural, historical and social and political contexts, considering the way in which national identity is imagined, interrogated and contested in these films. The module explores the articulation of nationhood and national identities in European film through a variety of themes. The themes are linked with important contemporary issues of Europe’s historical and social experience. They include European cinema and the idea of Europe; the European and the national; European art cinema; popular European genres; history, memory and the national past; space and place in European cinema; stars as national and transnational icons; diasporic national identities; European co-productions and franchised television dramas and women’s film and television in Europe.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module considers contemporary American television in relation to industry shifts, stylistic innovation and its representation of American culture, society and politics. Studies will examine studios such as HBO and a variety of comedies and dramas as case studies of industrial issues and cultural representations.

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  • No module details available
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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The module explores ideas around stardom and performance, considering their significance in relation to notions of identity, cultural context, filmic narrative and audience reception. A number of case studies will be examined as the module explores shifting ideas of stardom across both eras and screen media.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module enables students to undertake a short period of professional activity and to gain credit for their achievements. The activity can be employment, a work placement, professional training, volunteering in the not-for-profit sector, or where available, within a Virtual Business Environment within the University.

    It is expected that the student should work for a minimum of 70 hours, for which they will be required to provide evidence. The 70 hours can be completed in 10 working days in a full-time mode during the summer (where available), or spread over a semester in a part-time mode. Additionally, learners may in some cases be able to utilise their existing part-time / vacation employment providing they can demonstrate that it is personally developmental and involves a level of responsibility (decided upon submission of the role details by the Module Leader).

    The work based learning activity should enable the student to build on previous experiences and learning gained within their academic course and elsewhere. It should provide learning opportunities for personal development. The student is encouraged and supported in developing the ability to identify applied knowledge and skills that enhance their work performance, ensure their continued improvement and apply theory to practice as appropriate. The learner should develop improved understanding of themselves, and the workplace through reflective and reflexive learning.

    • Students will be contacted soon after they register for the module (e.g. June for those registered for October) to ensure they understand the requirements and are able to find suitable activity
    • The University must ensure that suitable health and safety requirements are in place and the work activity needs to be approved by the module team before they start the role. The suitability of the opportunities will be assessed on an individual basis.
    • Where required, students will be supported in finding suitable opportunities and with all aspects of their job search and applications. The Careers and Employability Team will work with Faculty teams to provide this support. However, it is the student's’ responsibility to obtain suitable employment, and roles cannot be guaranteed.
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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    This module explores issues of reception and interpretation within the field of film studies both in historical and theoretical terms. Using a variety of case-studies, the module explores the historical and theoretical issues that inform and structure film reception and interpretation, the interaction between text and context and the formation of film canons.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module allows students to explore in depth a theory or theory/practice topic of their own choice, arising out of their study at levels 4 and 5 (subject to supervisor approval). Students have formulated an initial plan in the level 5 module ‘Representation and Identity’. Students are further supported in the development of the project via Film Studies workshops at the beginning of the academic year and at intervals throughout. Their individual study is facilitated by a tutor assigned to the project according to subject specialism.

    This module is mainly self-managed by the student with facilitation by a specialist in the chosen subject. Students’ individual work is supported by regular consultation and feedback from their tutor and peer-led workshops.

    The project incorporates both formative and summative assessment. Students will present their project plan orally in a subject specific workshop and in written form to their project supervisor. The summative assessment consists of the actual project, either a written project or a film with outline, treatment and theoretical statement (90%) and the project management (10%).

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module explores the ways in which Hollywood film represents American history and culture. Considering both specific historical events and broader cultural eras, the module examines both issues of historical narrative and Hollywood’s key role in both representing and challenging norms of American culture.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module charts the development of the French New Wave, a group of films of the late 1950s and 1960s and one of the most influential movements in film history.
    The work of a new generation of directors many of whom had started as film critics, the module will consider this distinctive film style in the context of the social changes that transformed post-war French society and culture.
    In tandem with the rise of cinephilia and the love of American cinema, the module will trace the passage from theory into practice. The textual properties of the films and their artistic innovations will be explored in connection with the representation of youth, modernity, the city of Paris, history and gender relations.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module examines the Hollywood film musical, its historical development and its relationship to American culture and identity. Films will be explored in relation to a variety of generic, structural, stylistic and thematic issues.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    This module will develop further students’ understanding of and practice in screenwriting. The module will focus particularly on how both television writing and a range of film texts might differ from accepted conventions of writing for the screen. Students will be introduced to a range of texts and approaches which develop their understanding of both the specifics of writing for television and alternative approaches to writing for film. Students will produce their own treatment and script showing the influence of one or more of the approaches discussed.

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After the course

Graduates of this course can pursue postgraduate study or go on to work in a variety of fields, including the creative and cultural industries, film criticism and academia.

As the hub of the film and television industries in the UK, London provides many options, both in organisations such as the British Film Institute, the BBC, ITV and Channel 4, and in the numerous independent production companies located across the city.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

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How to apply

Apply to us for September 2019

Applying for a full-time undergraduate degree starting this September is quick and easy – simply call our Clearing hotline on or complete our online Clearing application form.

UK/EU applicants for September full-time entry must apply via UCAS unless specified otherwise.

Applicants for September part-time entry should apply direct to the University using the online application.

Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course.

Our UCAS institution code is L68.

Visit UCAS for more details.

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