Natural Sciences (Chemistry) - BSc (Hons)

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Why study this course?

Our undergraduate degree in natural sciences will enable you to maintain a breadth of science subjects reflecting the increasingly multidisciplinary nature of scientific research and enterprise.

This course's highly flexible structure will allow you to tailor the degree towards your personal interests whilst providing the core laboratory, IT and performance skills to succeed in your chosen career.

More about this course

This wide-reaching course will equip you with technical and transferable skills and competencies across a range of subjects within the natural sciences. On graduation you will be well-equipped to take on an exciting role in the chemical, biological or pharmaceutical industries, or progress to postgraduate study.

A typical week involves a minimum of 12 hours' contact time with lecturers in a variety of forms including lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops or practicals. Practicals and projects are conducted in our £30 million Science Centre, which is one of the largest and most advanced science teaching facilities in Europe with 280 workstations and specialist laboratory equipment.

Our Learning Centre has many areas available for group or independent study with Wi-Fi and computer facilities as well as a café where you can relax with friends over a coffee. We've also invested in additional interactive, digital laboratory resources, which will support you in your preparation for practical classes and written practical reports.

There is also the opportunity to become a member of the Life Sciences Society, which in turn can provide you with the opportunity to attend several social and professional events. This welcoming society will help you build the skills you'll need for a career within life sciences.

You’ll leave this course ready to pursue a career in the high-technology, science-based industries. You could choose to work in sectors such as education or healthcare, with roles such as developer, lab technician and researcher on offer. You’ll also develop the IT, research and analytical skills that are valued by employers in many different industries such as finance and commerce.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through mini-tests, practical reports, posters, presentations, essays, short-answer tests and examinations.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code CF13
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BCC from three A levels including grades CC or above in Chemistry and another Science (or a minimum of 104 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Progression Diploma or Access to HE Diploma of 60 credits)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Natural Sciences (Chemistry) (including foundation year) BSc (Hons).

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualification. This module aims to provide an overview of the organisation, expression, and replication of genetic information in prokaryotes and eukaryotes together with principles of Mendelian inheritance; examine the consequences of mutation on gene expression together with an introduction to techniques of gene analysis and manipulation. This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    Description: This module is a companion module to CY4002 (General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry). It covers the fundamentals of inorganic and physical chemistry needed for students of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Science. Students will undertake practical exercises and practice problem solving skills based on the material taught.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    The module provides an introduction to key topics of Physics relevant to Chemistry and the Natural Sciences including classical mechanics, waves and vibrations, quantum mechanics, electrostatics, electromagnetism, optics and atomic spectroscopy. It gives an appreciation of the importance of modelling physical systems mathematically in order to predict the behaviour of chemical or biological systems.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Description: The module provides an introduction to core aspects of chemistry - concepts of naming and drawing chemical formulae, isomerism, moles, reaction processes, and interactions between particles are enumerated. The second half of the module is concerned with the fundamentals. It introduces basic chemical concepts within the context of Organic Chemistry, and starts to develop the more specialist knowledge of organic reactions required for later modules of organic chemistry.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module will introduce students to safe contemporary (GLP) practice in the laboratory environment, practical bioscience techniques, simple chemical techniques and the discipline of accurate laboratory record keeping. Professional issues, study skills and data analysis will be integrated in the module. In some practical sessions the techniques are related more specifically to the degree area the student is studying.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility. More specifically the module aims to give students an introduction to the laboratory environment by exposing them to simple bioscience and fundamental chemical procedures. Further it aims to: introduce and familiarise the student with/to the laboratory environment, including its capacity to harness cutting edge technology (e.g. laboratory informatics systems, deployment of software for use in virtual experiments). These aspects are intended to enhance both the student experience and pedagogic quality of the provision. The module also aims to develop basic lab practice: personal safety (as expedited by COSHH and Risk Assessments), awareness of others and where appropriate to consider ethical issues that can have an impact on the execution of a given experiment. It is intended that students will become competent in writing laboratory records and scientific reports where emphasis is placed on: contemporary scientific record keeping, style, recording data, interpreting data and drawing a conclusion from results. Students will be introduced to basic lab procedures such as: handling of scientific apparatus, handling, purification and analysis of biological and chemical agents, including their safe handling and an introduction to microbiological and biomedical techniques. The development of study skills and the analysis of data will be a core component of the module. This will be fostered by integrating statistical analysis within practical sessions allowing students to analyse generated data and link theory to practice. Professional issues will also be integrated into the module. The transferable skills that will be developed will not only enable students to derive maximum benefit from their chosen courses of study, but to also allow them to consolidate and inculcate these in preparation for employment and employability.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    This module will develop problem solving and report writing skills in qualitative analytical chemistry and will enable students to identify analytical substrates on the basis of combined analytical results from a variety of sources.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module provides an introduction to physiological, cellular and molecular fundamentals of human immunology. It includes consideration of innate and acquired immune defences, genetic variation and immune defence, and immune responses or involvement in a range of pathological conditions. The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    The module integrates the knowledge and skills acquired from other modules, and encourages independent learning through the access of information using appropriate laboratory, primary and secondary sources, and informatics resources. It develops competence in laboratory skills through practical work, and in scientific writing. It aims to develop students’ qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment including developing ability to solve problems, and gather and interpret data to inform a focussed theme and writing reports. Moreover students have an opportunity to develop self-management employability skills by engaging fully with the learning material and opportunities made available to them, and by continually reflecting on their progress through the module using the regular feedback opportunities available to them.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    This module will enable students to extend their understanding of the principles of molecular biology in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, with emphasis on understanding mechanisms of gene expression, genome structure, variation and replication, and genetic inheritance and genetic causes of disease. The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    The module integrates the knowledge and skills acquired from other modules and encourages independent learning through the access of information using appropriate laboratory, primary and secondary sources, and informatics resources. It develops competence in laboratory skills through practical work, and in scientific writing. It aims to develop students’ qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment including developing ability to solve problems and gather and interpret data to inform a focussed theme and writing reports. Moreover students have an opportunity to develop self-management employability skills by engaging fully with the learning material and opportunities made available to them, and by continually reflecting on their progress through the module using the regular feedback opportunities available to them.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module will develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of the major areas of physical chemistry and give an appreciation of the importance of modelling physicochemical processes mathematically in order to be able to predict the behaviour of chemical systems. The module will examine key theories and applications of thermodynamics, kinetics, surface chemistry and electrochemistry.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module aims to develop an understanding of the relationships between structure, bonding and reactivity of metal compounds and complexes in d- and f- block. The knowledge gained will give students an understanding of the role of metals and metal compounds in disease, diagnosis and treatment. The practical aspects of the module will enable students to acquire skills and experience of preparative, analytical and instrumental methods which are essential to inorganic chemistry. The module offers students from BSc Pharmaceutical Science to increase their knowledge of inorganic chemistry and the role in drug development etc. A key discipline throughout the BSc Chemistry degree it builds and reaffirms whilst allowing students to appreciate the whole of the periodic table.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module relates the physical and chemical behaviour of polyfunctional acyclic and cyclic organic compounds and biomolecules to their structures and electronic properties. Taught classes will be reinforced by practical exercises and spectroscopic problems.

    Assessment: 4 Semester 1 Mini-Tests (20%), Practical Portfolio (30%), 10-minute Presentation (15%), Unseen Exam (35%)

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module will enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of the major areas of physical chemistry for the life sciences and further develop their ability to model physicochemical processes mathematically in order to be able to predict the behaviour of chemical systems. The module will examine key theories and applications of thermodynamics, the kinetics of life processes, quantum theory, heterogeneous catalysis and molecular spectroscopy.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Friday afternoon

    This module will enable students to demonstrate the skills necessary to carry out a scientific programme requiring significant research. It will allow students to demonstrate the final development of their subject knowledge, skills and understanding through extended research based on laboratory, literature or field work, or meta-analysis of databases. This research will lead to the presentation of a detailed written report and a Powerpoint presentation of results. This module aims to encourage the student to reflect and build upon their subject knowledge and expertise by means of a specific investigation requiring significant research; develop the skills necessary to plan, carry out, analyse and report upon the results of an experimental or analytical programme on a scientific topic; allow the student to demonstrate that s/he has achieved a high level of personal development through working independently with the minimum necessary supervision; allow the student to demonstrate their understanding and application of safe and considerate working practices, particularly within the laboratory.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module will enable students to extend their understanding of disease and toxicity. They will study the influences of endogenous and foreign compound metabolism on pathology. Students will learn how these pathological processes can be modulated in the treatment of disease and poisonings.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module aims to provide students with the opportunity to understand the principles and practices of biochemical pathology . This will be by expanding a student's knowledge and understanding of human biotransformations (metabolism) particularly as they influence the nature of disease(pathology) and toxic states (toxicology). Students will engage with problems in toxicology and pathology and study a range of topics including forensic, regulatory and environmental toxicology and metabolic pathology. They will be provided with an understanding of the key role of foreign compound (xenobiotic) metabolism in biochemical toxicology and given the opportunity to study the aetiology and treatment of disease and poisonings.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    The module aims to develop students’ understanding of advanced bioanalytical techniques and to enable students to determine which analytical technique is suitable for a particular type of sample. The module will reinforce and build on analysis skills introduced in CH5007 and provide an opportunity for students to interpret more advanced data, particularly spectra and chromatograms and to solve defined problems. The students will gain practical experience in selected analytical techniques.
    This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility and decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts. The module should also help students to gain the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    This module aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the relation between structure, bonding and reactivity of organometallic and main group compounds. In addition, the module aims to develop students understanding of modern characterisation in solid state chemistry. Allied to this, the module will develop an awareness of the spectroscopic techniques available to an inorganic chemist and provide them with contexts that will allow them to develop problem solving skills in this area. In addition the module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment. They will be required to exercise initiative and personal responsibility, as well as decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    This module aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the relation between structure, bonding and reactivity of organometallic and main group compounds. It also will show students how fundamental topics in inorganic chemistry can be applied to the interpretation of the roles of metal ions in biological systems. In addition, the module aims to develop students understanding of modern characterisation in solid state chemistry. Allied to this, the module will develop an awareness of the spectroscopic techniques available to an inorganic chemist and provide them with contexts that will allow them to develop problem solving skills in this area. Contemporary topics of importance in inorganic chemistry, such as supramolecular chemistry will also be introduced via a research exercise and the students practical skills will be enhanced by exposure to specific techniques from organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry.
    In addition the module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment. They will be required to exercise initiative and personal responsibility, as well as decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts. Finally the module aim to provide students with the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    Description: This module builds upon, and extends, material taught in the 2nd year, specifically in organic chemistry. It provides students with a deeper understanding of organic chemical reactivity.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    The module examines key aspects of atomic and molecular spectra arising from the absorption, emission or scattering of electromagnetic radiation. Topics include atomic spectroscopy, molecular symmetry and group theory, rotational spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy. It provides an appreciation for varied applications in which spectroscopic methods are utilised for the determination of chemical structure and properties.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module introduces different normative philosophical bases for ethical decision-making, and gives opportunities for critically applying these principles and approaches to a range of contemporary moral issues in the human sciences.
    This module aims to introduce underlying concepts of normative ethics and processes of ethical decision-making, and to offer the opportunity for in-depth critical examination of specific ethical issues and dilemmas in the human sciences. It will enable the exploration of different approaches to ethical issues in scientific research and practice, and will provide students with an awareness of the scope of the field of bioethics. In addition, it aims to facilitate the development of moral reasoning skills that may be applied in practical contexts, and to provide a supportive environment for the development of competence in written and oral presentation. Finally, the module will introduce students to professional ethics and codes of conduct in the human sciences.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    This module will enable students to develop an understanding of the various strategies used in drug design and the molecular mechanisms by which drugs act in the body.

    The module aims to: deepen students’ awareness of the major influence chemistry has had on the treatment of various diseases and debilitating conditions; enable students to assess critically the methodologies and strategies that govern whether or not a synthetic compound (i.e. new chemical entity, NCE) may be regarded as a good drug candidate.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality
    Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    This module aims to enable students to develop an understanding of the chemical components of a range of natural products (e.g. terpenes, plant glycosides, alkaloids, carbohydrates, peptides/proteins and nucleic acids), as well as the methods used for their appropriate extraction and quantitation. It will also show students how to deploy a range of spectroscopic techniques for structure elucidation of some of these vitally important molecules. In addition, the module aims to develop students understanding of both the biosyntheses, and synthetic methodologies, involved in deriving the active constituents of drug-like molecules found in nature (e.g. in pharmacognosy) and provide them with contexts that will allow them to develop problem solving skills in this area. Contemporary topics of importance in natural products such as applications of combinatorial chemistry, photochemistry (industrial-scale) and semi-synthetic drug development will also be introduced via lectures, tutorials and workshops and the
    students’ practical skills will be enhanced by exposure to specific techniques from
    modern natural product isolation protocols. In addition, the module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment. They will be required to exercise initiative and personal responsibility, as well as decision-making
    in complex and unpredictable contexts. Finally, the module aims to provide students with the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    This module provides the student with the opportunity to consolidate and complement their academic learning with vocational experience in medical or related laboratories or within a field related to studies. The placement provides supervised training and work experience in a relevant field. Placements should give students the opportunity to gain skills specific to their subject or industry of choice as well as the employability skills required for real-life work. It also increases their knowledge of an industry or sector, allowing them to make better informed decisions about future career choices.

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After the course

You’ll leave this course ready to pursue a career in the high-technology, science-based industries. You could choose to work in sectors such as education or healthcare, with roles such as developer, lab technician and researcher on offer. You’ll also develop the IT, research and analytical skills that are valued by employers in many different industries such as finance and commerce.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you’re a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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