Dietetics and Nutrition - BSc (Hons)

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Why study this course?

The Dietetics and Nutrition BSc degree will help you develop the relevant knowledge and skills to become a dietitian. You'll study life and nutritional sciences, exploring the role of diet and nutrition in disease prevention and treatment.

Upon successful completion of the course, you’ll be eligible to apply to the register of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of all 2017 graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

This course received a 95% overall student satisfaction rate in the 2018 National Student Survey.

 
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More about this course

On this undergraduate degree course, you’ll learn the skill necessary to become a dietitian – the only qualified health professional that can assess, diagnose and treat diet and nutrition related problems at an individual and wider public health level.

We’ll introduce you to the most up-to-date public health and scientific research on food, health and disease. This practical guidance will enable you to help members of the public make healthier lifestyle and food choices.

Throughout your studies, you’ll gain an understanding of the conditions where nutrition plays a significant role in disease management. You'll develop the knowledge to provide nutrition and dietetic care for individuals, groups and populations who have or already are at risk of developing long-term health conditions.

In addition to lectures and seminars, this degree includes group work, role plays and practical sessions in the laboratory and the technical kitchen. Our internationally renowned teaching staff are actively involved in dietetics practice and research, and will provide consistent support and mentorship.

You’ll get hands-on experience through three full-time work placements during the course. There's a two-week placement in Year 2, a 12-week placement in Year 3 and a 14-week placement in Year 4 that normally includes a public health nutrition component. Your work will primarily be in National Health Service (NHS) organisations in London and your performance will be assessed as part of your degree.

Successfully complete the course curriculum and you'll meet all the standards needed for membership of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the British Dietetic Association (BDA).

Assessment

You'll be assessed through seminar and poster presentations, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE), case studies, practical reports, seen/unseen examinations, in-class tests and a compulsory final year dissertation.

Professional accreditation

The course is approved by the HCPC. Successfully complete your degree, and you'll be eligible to apply for registration.

The course is also accredited by the BDA. When you have the status "Dietitian" on your HCPC registration, you can join the BDA as a full member.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code B401
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBB in three A levels including Biology and Chemistry (or a minimum of 120 UCAS points)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)
  • if students of the Sciences Extended Degree at London Met want to apply for the Dietetics and Nutrition BSc, they are required to take the following modules in the extended degree: PR3001 Scientific Studies, PR3002 Biology, PR3003 Chemistry and the optional module, they must pass each module at 70% or more without reassessment
  • 10 days or more recent (within the last two years) work experience in a care environment
  • attendance at a dietetics career event
  • an enhanced DBS Check for the Adults' and Children's Workforce
  • Clearance for non-exposure prone procedures (EPP) by an approved occupational health service
  • applicants will be required to pass an interview including those applying from the Sciences Extended Degree at London Met

The University will invite you to complete the DBS check, which will need to be done by 31 July. This check will cost you £62.13 and the update service costs £13 per year.

Science foundation and access courses will be considered with a minimum of 60 credits, 45 of which must be at Level 3:

  • 15 credits at Level 3 must be in Biology or related subjects such as anatomy and physiology
  • 15 credits at Level 3 must be in chemistry or related subjects such as biochemistry
  • 15 credits at Level 3 should be in science related subjects (eg physics, maths) or subjects applied to science (eg nutrition, environmental science, psychology)
  • the remaining 15 credits should be in study skills
  • applicants should achieve a distinction or equivalent numerical mark in 75% of the credits taken in Science subjects at Level 3

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Sciences Extended Degree or the Human Nutrition Extended Degree.

For further information and support on how to prepare your application and meet our entry requirements, visit our undergraduate Dietetics FAQ.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS at level 7.0, with no individual component of less than 6.5. For more information about English qualifications, please see our English language requirements.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces learners to the theoretical and practical aspects of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease. It is designed for life-science learners with an interest in human biology, but particularly for those wishing to pursue advanced studies in the Biosciences or Forensic Science.
    This module aims to provide learners, through lectures, tutorials and practical classes, with a sound knowledge of human body structure using appropriate anatomical nomenclature and an in-depth understanding of the physiology of selected body systems. The module will also aim to introduce basic concepts in immunology and pathology.
    To pass the module, learners need to achieve a minimum aggregate mark of 40%. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    The module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function. This module aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.
    The learners must pass with an overall mark of 40%. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    A core module which provides learners with an understanding of basic cell structures and an awareness of different cell types and relates the structure and activities of cell components to their functions and to cellular activities as a whole.
    The second half of the module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to expose learners to some of the key questions of cell biology concerning cell structure and intracellular activities. Provide learners with practical experience in a range of laboratory-based biological techniques. Enhance learners' ability to manage themselves and to develop organisational, critical and analytical skills which are applicable to the workplace.
    Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The module develops an understanding of human nutrition science which includes an introduction to the nutrient and non-nutrient components of foods, their main metabolic and physiological roles, and main food sources in the diet. It introduces knowledge of the nutritional composition of foods, the food groups, the concept of energy and energy balance, dietary reference values, and the importance of diet in health and disease through the lifecycle. In addition, the nutritional and physiological factors which impinge on food choice are explored.

    This module underpins the human nutrition content and thread of the course and encourages engagement with nutrition science from the outset. It ensures that learners are equally equipped with basic nutrition science concepts, regardless of their entry-level understanding, before engaging in more complex aspects in subsequent years. The learners start to develop skills in: ingredient, meal and diet analysis; calculating the absolute and relative nutritive value of foods and meals; a basic understanding of food labels, including nutrition and health claims; simple food preparation and cooking; and an understanding of how aspects of food preparation can affect nutritional quality. Nutrients, foods, diets, and their effects are considered from a global and UK perspective reflecting the globalisation of the food chain, the diversity of our learners, and their future employability.

    To pass the module, learners need to achieve a minimum aggregate mark of 40%. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Through successful completion of the module, learners will develop a broad understanding of psychology and sociology in relation to health and nutrition behaviour.

    Learners will also begin to develop skills in professionalism and have a better understanding of employment opportunities and job application processes.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    Specifically, it aims to provide learners with knowledge and understanding of the sociology and psychological theories relevant to the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Also, the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Dietitians and Association for Nutrition Code of Ethics and Statement of Professional Conduct for nutritionists.

    This module will support learners to reflect on the range of employment opportunities available. Relevant aspects of nutrition & dietetic practice, theory and research will also be studied. This module also aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The module aims to integrate areas of clinical medicine and nutrition, providing the basis for an understanding of the rationale for the formulation of dietetic treatment plans. To develop clinical and communication skills which learners will require for professional practice.
    It focuses on the medical, surgical, pharmacological and dietary management of a range of conditions including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and allergic diseases.
    It also covers methods of nutritional support and infant, childhood and adolescent nutrition. Learners will become familiar with the model and process for nutrition and dietetic practice.
    Learners will also learn how to facilitate learning and promote self care through the delivery of group education.
    Semester: year (30 credit)
    Required prior learning: DT4003 Sociology and Psychology for Dietitians, DT4004 Anatomy and Physiology (for Dietitians)
    Assessment: Case study (assessment and diagnosis) (20%) (1200 words) In class Test (30%) (1 hour) Case study (nutrition and dietetic care process) (20%) (2000 words) Three Progress Tests (3x30 mins) (30%) 80% attendance required, participation in group education role play This module forms an essential part of practice based learning preparation.
    Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module focuses on the concepts and techniques used in nutritional science and research. It covers dietary assessment methodology and broad principles of epidemiology in the context of nutrition and dietetics. The module supports on-going development of professional skills.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to develop a critical understanding of the use of dietary assessment methods for assessing nutrient intake in individuals and in populations and to apply the use of appropriate dietary assessment tools in nutrition and dietetic professional practice and in research. It will also introduce health statistics and data, this will aid development and understanding concepts regarding nutritional epidemiology.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    This module looks at the microbial world and how microorganisms could cause food spoilage and foodborne diseases as well as contributing towards preservation of our food. The major microorganisms in food and their characteristics will be discussed, focusing on intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting their growth in food. The module also, discusses in some details how microorganisms are controlled through food preservation and food processing methods. The module also focusses the effects on nutrients of processing and preservation. In addition, the basics of proximate food analysis techniques and measuring food energy will be discussed in food labelling context.

    The overall aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module aims to give learners insight into how and why foods are processed and the effects of processing on nutrients. It also covers the principles of food spoilage and preservation and hygiene and safety of the food. The module also seeks to develop competence in discussion and written work, encouraging clarity and scientific rigour.

    The learners must pass with an overall mark of 40%. In addition learners must normally obtain
    at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and
    39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module focuses on the concept of nutritional balance and turnover, focussing on energy and nitrogen balance in humans and deals with their role in health and disease. It also develops a critical understanding of the metabolic function of micronutrients and to demonstrate the consequences of insufficient and excessive nutrient intakes in human nutrition.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to develop a critical understanding of energy and nitrogen balance and their contribution to human nutritional status. To apply this understanding to practical situations where there are implications for human health, for example, obesity, starvation and cachexia.

    To develop a critical understanding of the physiology and biochemistry of micronutrients. To demonstrate the metabolic consequences of insufficient and excessive nutrient intakes in human nutrition. This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module focuses on understanding key principles of metabolism. These principles are illustrated through study of the major metabolic pathways. How metabolism interacts with the nutritional environment is discussed throughout the module.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications This module aims to provide an understanding of the principles of metabolism encourage an appreciation of the diversity and interconnection of metabolic pathways, relate these to nutritional status and to stimulate an understanding of the applicability of metabolism in a broad range of biological context. This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester
    • spring semester
    • summer studies

    Practice Based Learning 1 is a 2 week learning experience in dietetic practice providing the opportunity for learners to observe and begin to develop core skills in implementing the model and process for nutrition and dietetic practice with individuals in a variety of settings.
    All clinical practice based learning modules are undertaken in an approved dietetic setting which is primarily within an NHS organisation providing acute, secondary or community care. The purpose of the practical practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s dietetic judgment based on the clinical decision making process, through a focus on the integration and practical application of the knowledge and skills learnt in the university setting.
    The practice based learning modules are a compulsory component of the course.
    If learners do not successfully meet the learning outcomes for all three practice based experiences, they will not meet the requirements for registration as a dietitian in the UK.
    The practice based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.
    Brief Guidance Notes:
    • Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice based learning.
    • Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
    • If learners have additional learning needs identified on practice based learning such as a requirement for maths study skills or have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia they will be required to take appropriate corrective action prior to their next practice based learning. Guidance and support will be offered by the university through the academic tutor (AT) and practice based learning tutor.
    • Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
    • Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
    • This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are eligible to apply to the register of health and care professionals on completion of BSc Dietetics and Nutrition/BSc Dietetics/PG Diploma/MSc Dietetics and Nutrition.
    • Learners are not usually eligible for a repeat attempt of Practice Based Learning 1. If an individual learner fails to achieve the learning outcomes of Practice Based Learning 1 the learner should be counselled and advised on an alternative course route. (refer to couse specific regulations within the relevant course specification)

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    DT5057 Professional Practice in Dietetics and Nutrition
    This module provides learners with knowledge of the principles of catering management within the public sector. This includes methods of food provision, preparation, distribution and quality control. Constraints on menu planning and the development, implementation and evaluation of nutritional standards for catering services are discussed. This foundation of knowledge is then applied to the management of malnutrition with a specific focus on the professional and ethical issues associated with food provision and the application of microbiology to dietetic practice. This module also prepares learners for Practice based learning 1 (dietitians).
    Teaching period: Autumn
    Assessment: A 2000 word report and a 1500 word portfolio of their learning on the module. Learners are also required to obtain a level 2 food hygiene certificate to prepare or sell food online learning.
    Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components. If an assessment is passed on reassessment, then the maximum mark awarded will be 40%.
    Notes: Restricted to BSc (Hons) Dietetics & Nutrition

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module focuses on the concepts and techniques used within audit and research, focussing on the application of these within the field of dietetics. Learners will develop an appreciation for different types of methodological approaches to research and audit, within a core subject matter for dietetics.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to introduce the concepts of research methodology and professional conduct in a nutrition and dietetic context to enable them to prepare for their final year project. This module will support learners as they consider how to seek future employment. This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making encompassing audits.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    Learners will learn the theory and application of public health nutrition and will understand the process of developing and evaluating health promotion programs and public health nutrition interventions. They will assess live government data on health and evaluate the priorities set in public health documents.

    Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition, learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module provides an opportunity for students to further develop their understanding and practice of the dietary management of diseases in both adults and children. It also enables students to develop their skills in undertaking one to one consultations.

    This module forms an essential part of placement preparation. Students must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition students must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • summer studies

    This module builds on the experiences from Practice based learning 1 and focuses on consolidating the skills and knowledge developed in preparation for undertaking Practice based learning 2 and 3.
    Semester: Spring and Summer
    Prerequisites: DI6W51 Practice based learning 1
    Assessment: Structured reflective account (700 words) Journal Club presentation (10 minutes). Written Case Study (700 words). Attendance (minimum of 80% ) - pass/fail
    This module forms an essential part of practice based learning preparation. Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.
    Brief Guidance Notes: This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are sufficiently prepared for the demands of practice based learning 2 and 3.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module aims to:
    • Explore the fundamental physiological and nutritional influences between genetic, physiological, environmental and nutritional influences on human growth and development throughout the lifespan.
    • Learners will develop an awareness of the short and long-term consequences for growth and development if these factors are not optimal.
    • The concept of nutritional assessment and surveillance and the evaluation of different nutritional assessment systems.
    • Introduce indices of nutritional status and the use of reference standards.
    • Provide opportunity for the evaluation of population and individual data of nutritional status including the collection and interpretation of anthropometric data.
    • This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills
    • necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility;
    • decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature
    Semester: year (15 credit)
    Required prior learning: DT5051 Macro and micronutrients
    Assessment: practical report (2000 words)(40%), progress unseen exam (1.5 hours)(60%).
    Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester
    • spring semester
    • summer studies

    Practice Based Learning 2 provides the opportunity for learners to build on their academic knowledge of nutrition and dietetics for individuals and groups in a range of environments. The learners will observe and practice the knowledge, skills and professional attributes required to implement the process for nutrition and dietetic practice with individuals and groups in a variety of settings.
    Learners will experience different ways of communicating with a variety of people and practice skills that they will use throughout their careers. The learners will also establish links with practising dietitians in the area. They will acquire and demonstrate a range of skills which will be assessed against the British Dietetic Association Curriculum Framework.
    All clinical practice based learning modules are undertaken in an approved dietetic setting which is primarily within an NHS organisation providing relevant patient care for example but not exclusively within acute, secondary, tertiary or community settings.
    The purpose of the practical practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s dietetic judgment based on the clinical decision making process, through a focus on the integration and practical application of the knowledge and skills learnt in the university setting.
    The practice based learning modules are a compulsory component of the course.
    If learners do not successfully meet the learning outcomes for all three practice based experiences, they will not meet the requirements for registration as a dietitian in the UK.
    The practice based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.
    Brief Guidance Notes:
    • Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice based learning.
    • Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
    • If learners have additional learning needs identified on practice based learning such as a requirement for maths study skills or have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia they will be required to take appropriate corrective action prior to their next practice based learning. Guidance and support will be offered by the university through the academic tutor (AT) and practice based learning tutor.
    • Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
    • Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
    • This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are eligible to apply to the register of health and care professionals on completion of BSc Dietetics and Nutrition/BSc Dietetics/PG Diploma/MSc Dietetics and Nutrition.
    • Please refer to section 13: Description of assessment items for details of placement verification and procedures in the event of placement failure.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module characterises the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical investigation and treatment of selected systems diseases that make a significant contribution to morbidity and mortality within healthcare. Aspects covered begin with an overview of pathology, followed by a systems approach to disease, including cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, immune disorders, obesity, diabetes, inborn errors of metabolism, nutritional deficiencies, and cancer
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. More specifically the module aims to provide an opportunity for in-depth study of selected body systems with reference to the pathogenesis of disease, its diagnosis and therapeutic options. The module will also highlight the pivotal role of pathology in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of disease. In addition learners will be shown how body structure and function continues to change throughout the lifespan with reference to the increasing incidence and pathophysiology of selected “age-related” systems diseases. Learners’ ability to research and evaluate biomedical issues and present their findings in a cogent manner will be developed.
    This module aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and, the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.
    Learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components. If the module is passed on reassessment, then the maximum mark awarded will be 40%.

    Read full details.

Year 4 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module teaches and consolidates learning of all areas of nutrition and dietetics to develop and consolidate learning on campus and during practice based learnings. Learners will be required to apply clinical measurement data and the physiological abnormalities of specific case studies to formulate an assessment and dietetic care plans as well as demonstrate knowledge and skills in undertaking public health nutrition strategies.
    Learners will be required to demonstrate an ability to practise within the ethical and legal boundaries of the dietetic profession.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. More specifically the module aims to consolidate and develop nutrition and dietetic knowledge and skills to ensure consistency of knowledge and ability. This module prepares learners for recruitment and selection processes in the NHS, future employment as it consolidates and develops all prior learning so that learners are fully prepared to take on the demands of a graduate entrant dietitian. This module aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and, the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

    Assessment: Seen exam (2 hours) (60%) Individual presentation (10 minutes) (40%).
    This module forms an essential part of preparation for employment. Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday morning

    The module aims to provide the learners with an opportunity to develop the skills of critical appraisal, interpretation, analysis, defending and reflection through the design and/or execution of a dietetics and nutrition-focused research project.
    In addition the module will develop advanced level knowledge of a specific area of the subject and allow learners to integrate the knowledge and skills acquired from other modules.
    Learners will be able to develop skills in employability allowing the opportunity to demonstrate competence as independent learners, through the design and/or execution and completion of the research project.
    In addition the learner will experience the process of nutrition research and develop professional, vocational and transferable skills to perform and present independent research.
    Learners will produce a substantive professional scientific report on the findings and present these findings, orally, in a scientific manner.
    This module aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and, the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.
    Assessment will comprise:
    1) Research paper –4000 word written report written in the style of a peer-reviewed scientific journal publication. Requires the learner to conduct a research study or audit and write up their research project in the standard format of a journal publication (i.e. abstract, background, methods, results, discussion, conclusion)
    2) Poster presentation –500 words poster
    3) Fifteen minute individual verbal presentation of poster.

    Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    This module provides learners with an understanding of the organisational infrastructure of public sector organisations. Context is provided through relevant local, regional and national social and administrative policy for both employment as well as for the provision of healthcare and social services. Management structures relevant to the dietetic professions are explored. The module aims to develop learning and practical tools to support experiences encountered during employment. It complements
    theory of government policies relevant to healthcare covered in modules such as
    Clinical Dietetics 1 and 2 and Applied Public Health and Nutrition.
    The module aims to provide learners with an understanding of the management and organisation of public sector organisations. In addition learners will learn about commissioning, business planning, financial management and marketing as well as the management of governance and risk within healthcare. Learners will also further develop their knowledge and understanding of continuous professional development , career pathways and management and leadership styles.
    Spring Semester
    Assessment: Business Case (2500 words) (50%) Oral Presentation (15 minutes) (
    50%)
    This module forms an essential part of preparation for employment. Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between
    35% and 39% may be compensated by other components

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester

    Practice Based Learning 3 is a 14 week practice based learning providing the opportunity for learners to observe and develop core skills in implementing the dietetic care process with individuals, groups and organisations/ communities in a variety of settings.
    They will experience different ways of communicating with a variety of people and practice skills that they will use throughout their careers. The learners will also establish links with practising dietitians in the area. They will acquire and demonstrate a range of skills which will be assessed against the British Dietetic Association Curriculum Framework.
    All clinical practice based learning modules are undertaken in an approved dietetic setting which is primarily within an NHS organisation providing relevant patient care for example but not exclusively within acute, secondary, tertiary or community settings.
    The purpose of the practical practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s dietetic judgment based on the clinical decision making process, through a focus on the integration and practical application of the knowledge and skills learnt in the university setting.
    The practice based learning modules are a compulsory component of the course.
    If learners do not successfully meet the learning outcomes for all three practice based modules, they will not meet the requirements for registration as a dietitian in the UK.
    The practice based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.
    Brief Guidance Notes:
    • Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice based learning.
    • Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
    • If learners have additional learning needs identified on practice based learning such as a requirement for maths study skills or have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia they will be required to take appropriate corrective action prior to their next practice based learning. Guidance and support will be offered by the university through the academic tutor (AT) and practice based learning tutor.
    • Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
    • Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
    • This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are eligible to apply to the register of health and care professionals on completion of BSc Dietetics and Nutrition/BSc Dietetics/PG Diploma/MSc Dietetics and Nutrition.
    • Please refer to section 13: Description of assessment items for details of placement verification and procedures in the event of placement failure.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

What our students say

"The lecturers have been helpful throughout the course. You can tell they are passionate about what they do and this helps us to learn in class. Their feedback is very prompt, which is useful for our studies."
National Student Survey (NSS)

"The course has been brilliant, I have definitely learnt a lot from it. The guest lectures have been inspirational too. I feel very excited to be preparing for work in this field."
National Student Survey (NSS)

After the course

Graduating from our Dietetics and Nutrition BSc (Hons) course is the start of an exciting and varied career in nutrition, health and disease management.

Many of our graduates now work in public health and health promotion, including NHS management of nutrition related diseases and/or disease related malnutrition as well as managing dietary needs in long term health conditions in primary care environments.

Funding arrangements

The funding arrangements for pre-registration Health Care Courses are changing from September 2017. Please refer to The Funding Clinic and the UK government website for more information.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

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How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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