Why study this course?

The Dietetics and Nutrition BSc degree will help you develop the relevant knowledge and skills to become a dietitian or nutritionist. You'll study life and nutritional sciences, exploring the role of diet and nutrition in disease prevention and treatment.

Upon successful completion of the course, you’ll be eligible to apply to the register of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

This course received an 86% overall student satisfaction score in the National Student Survey 2022.

Our nutrition and food science courses are impressively ranked third in the UK according to the Guardian University Guide. They are also ranked third for teaching quality and seventh for course satisfaction. And our food science courses are also ranked fourth in the UK for student satisfaction in the Complete University Guide 2023.

More about this course

On this undergraduate degree course, you’ll learn the skill necessary to become a dietitian – the only qualified health professional that can assess, diagnose and treat diet and nutrition related problems at an individual and wider public health level.

We’ll introduce you to the most up-to-date public health and scientific research on food, health and disease. This practical guidance will enable you to help members of the public make healthier lifestyle and food choices.

Throughout your studies, you’ll gain an understanding of the conditions where nutrition plays a significant role in disease management. You'll develop the knowledge to provide nutrition and dietetic care for individuals, groups and populations who have or already are at risk of developing long-term health conditions.

In addition to lectures and seminars, this degree includes group work, role plays and practical sessions in the laboratory and the technical kitchen. Our internationally renowned teaching staff are actively involved in dietetics practice and research, and will provide consistent support and mentorship.

You’ll get hands-on experience through full-time work placements during the course. In your second year you'll complete a two-week placement and a three-week placement in a public health setting. In your third year you'll have a 12-week placement, followed by an 11-week placement in your final year. Your work will primarily be in National Health Service (NHS) organisations in London and your performance will be assessed as part of your degree.

Successful completion of this course allows you eligibility to apply to join the register of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Dietitian.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through seminar and poster presentations, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE), case studies, practical reports, seen/unseen examinations, in-class tests and a compulsory final year dissertation.

Professional accreditation

The course is approved by the HCPC. Successfully complete your degree, and you'll be eligible to apply for registration.

The course is also accredited by the BDA. When you have the status "Dietitian" on your HCPC registration, you can join the BDA as a full member.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code B401
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBB in three A levels including grade B or above in Biology and Chemistry (or a minimum of 120 UCAS points)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)
  • 10 days (or more) of recent (within the last two years) work experience in a care environment
  • attendance at a dietetics career event
  • an enhanced DBS Check for the Adults' and Children's Workforce
  • clearance for non-exposure prone procedures (EPP) by an approved occupational health service
  • attended and passed an interview

The University will invite you to complete the DBS check, which will need to be done by 31 July. This check will cost you £62.13 and the update service costs £13 per year.

Science foundation and access courses will be considered with a minimum of 60 credits, 45 of which must be at Level 3:

  • 15 credits at Level 3 must be in Biology or related subjects such as anatomy and physiology
  • 15 credits at Level 3 must be in chemistry or related subjects such as biochemistry
  • 15 credits at Level 3 should be in science related subjects (eg physics, maths) or subjects applied to science (eg nutrition, environmental science, psychology)
  • the remaining 15 credits should be in study skills
  • applicants should achieve a distinction or equivalent numerical mark in 75% of the credits taken in Science subjects at Level 3

If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc (Hons) degree.

Students are required to apply internally for Dietetics BSc and Dietetics and Nutrition BSc during their studies on Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc. There will be support and advice during this process.

Students are then required to pass all modules without reassessment with an average mark of ≥ 65%.

All applicants are required to attend an interview with academic staff. The interview is a chance for us to get to know you and provide further information about the course and the University. Applicants will be asked a series of questions that cover the following aspects:

  • Your interest in studying dietetics and why you would like to become a dietitian
  • Your understanding of the dietetic profession and your awareness of what they do
  • Your insights of your strengths and areas for growth during your studies

Additionally students must:

  • undertake five days of work experience with vulnerable populations.
  • pass a DBS check with checks for vulnerable adults and children.
  • attend a dietetic career event.

For further information and support on how to prepare your application and meet our entry requirements, visit our undergraduate Dietetics FAQ.

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Any university-level qualifications or relevant experience you gain prior to starting university could count towards your course at London Met. Find out more about applying for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL).

English language requirements

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. This course requires you to meet a specific standard listed under the exceptions in our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2022/23 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Monday morning

This module introduces students to the theoretical and practical aspects of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease. It is designed for life-science students with an interest in human biology, but particularly for those wishing to pursue advanced studies in human nutrition and dietetics.
This module aims to provide students, through lectures, tutorials and practical classes, with a sound knowledge of human body structure using appropriate anatomical nomenclature and an in-depth understanding of the physiology of selected body systems. The module will also aim to introduce basic concepts in immunology and pathology.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Monday morning

This module introduces students to the theoretical and practical aspects of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease. It is designed for life-science students with an interest in human biology, but particularly for those wishing to pursue advanced studies in Human Nutrition and Dietetics.
This module aims to provide students, through lectures, tutorials and practical classes, with a sound knowledge of human body structure using appropriate anatomical nomenclature and an in-depth understanding of the physiology of selected body systems. The module will also aim to introduce basic concepts in immunology and pathology.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Monday afternoon

Through successful completion of the module, learners will develop a broad understanding of psychology in relation to health and nutrition behaviour.

Learners will also further develop skills in professionalism such as presenting skills and team working.

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

Specifically, it aims to provide learners with knowledge and understanding of the psychological theories relevant to the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Also, the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency for Dietitians and Association for Nutrition (AFN) Code of Ethics and Statement of Professional Conduct for nutritionists.

Relevant aspects of nutrition & dietetic practice, theory and research will also be studied. This module also aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Thursday morning

The module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function.
The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function. This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

A core module which provides students with an understanding of basic cell structures and an awareness of different cell types and relates the structure and activities of cell components to their functions and to cellular activities as a whole.
The second half of the module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function.
The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to expose students to some of the key questions of cell biology concerning cell structure and intracellular activities. Provide students with practical experience in a range of laboratory-based biological techniques. Enhance students' ability to manage themselves and to develop organisational, critical and analytical skills which are applicable to the workplace.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

The module focuses on increasing your understanding of diet and health. Students will develop their knowledge of food quality, non-nutrient components of food, the effects of food processing and food fortification. The role of macronutrients in the aetiology of severe acute malnutrition will be explored. The module will provide an understanding of the link between dietary patterns, lifestyle and non-communicable diseases. Beyond scientific knowledge related to nutrition, the module will enhance your numeracy skills, food preparation and cooking skills. Nutrients, foods, diets, and their effects are considered from a global and UK perspective reflecting the globalisation of the food chain, the diversity of our students, and their future employability.

1. You will take part in food preparation and cooking to gain understanding of how aspects of food preparation can affect nutritional quality.
2. You will undertake nutrient analysis using a variety of databases.
3. Your will gain understanding of the role of diet through the lifecycle.
4. You will develop skills in food labelling, nutrition and health claims.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Thursday morning

Through successful completion of the module, learners will develop a broad understanding of sociology in relation to health and nutrition behaviour.

Learners will also begin to develop skills in professionalism and have a better understanding of employment opportunities and job application processes.

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

Specifically, it aims to provide learners with knowledge and understanding of sociology relevant to the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Also, the Health Care and Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency for Dietitians and Association for Nutrition (AfN) Code of Ethics and Statement of Professional Conduct for nutritionists.

This module will support learners to reflect on the range of employment opportunities available. Relevant aspects of nutrition & dietetic practice, theory and research will also be studied. This module also aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

The module introduces learners to fundamental topics in nutrition and provides an overview of nutrition and health. It develops understanding of the nutritional composition of foods, the main sources of foods in the diet and their metabolic and physiological roles. Concept of energy and energy balance are introduced.
In addition, the nutritional and physiological factors which impinge on food choice are explored. This module underpins the human nutrition content and thread of the course and encourages engagement with nutrition science from the outset. It ensures that students are equally equipped with basic nutrition science concepts, regardless of their entry-level understanding, before engaging in more complex aspects in subsequent years.
1. You will be introduced to current topics in nutrition and develop an overview of nutrition and health.
2. You will develop concepts of energy intake and energy expenditure.
3. You will learn how to calculate the absolute and relative value of nutrients.
4. You will be introduced to nutritional research, current recommendations and policies.
5. You will be informed about professional issues in nutrition in relation to ethics and code of conduct.

Year 2 modules include:

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Friday morning

This module focuses on the concepts and techniques used in nutritional science and research. It covers dietary assessment methodology and broad principles of epidemiology in the context of nutrition and dietetics. The module supports on-going development of professional skills.

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, it aims to develop a critical understanding of the use of dietary assessment methods for assessing nutrient intake in individuals and in populations and to apply the use of appropriate dietary assessment tools in nutrition and dietetic professional practice and in research. It will also introduce health statistics and data, this will aid development and understanding concepts regarding nutritional epidemiology.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Monday afternoon

This module looks at the microbial world and how microorganisms could cause food spoilage and foodborne diseases as well as contributing towards preservation of our food. The major microorganisms in food and their characteristics will be discussed, focusing on intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting their growth in food. The module discusses in some detail how microorganisms are controlled through food preservation and food processing methods. The module also focusses the effects on nutrients and anti-nutrients of processing and preservation. The basics of proximate food analysis techniques and measuring food energy will be discussed within a food labelling context. In addition, the module contains laboratory practicals on basic food microbiology.

The overall aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module aims to give learners insight into how and why foods are processed and the effects of processing on nutrients. It also covers the principles of food spoilage and preservation and hygiene and safety of the food. The module also seeks to develop competence in discussion and written work, encouraging clarity and scientific rigour.

The learners must pass with an overall mark of 40%. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Wednesday morning

This module focuses on the concept of nutritional balance and turnover, focussing on energy and nitrogen balance in humans and deals with their role in health and disease. It also develops a critical understanding of the metabolic function of micronutrients and to demonstrate the consequences of insufficient and excessive nutrient intakes in human nutrition.

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to develop a critical understanding of energy and nitrogen balance and their contribution to human nutritional status. To apply this understanding to practical situations where there are implications for human health, for example, obesity, starvation and cachexia.

To develop a critical understanding of the physiology and biochemistry of micronutrients. To demonstrate the metabolic consequences of insufficient and excessive nutrient intakes in human nutrition. This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon
  • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

The module aims to integrate areas of clinical medicine and nutrition, providing the basis for an understanding of the rationale for the formulation of dietetic treatment plans. To develop clinical and communication skills which learners will require for professional practice.
It focuses on the medical, surgical, pharmacological and dietary management of a range of conditions included within the syllabus.
Semester: autumn (15 credits)
Assessment: Case study (assessment and diagnosis) (40%) (1500 words) In class Test (60%) (1 hour) 80% attendance required. This module forms an essential part of practice based learning preparation.
Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

This module focuses on understanding key principles of metabolism. These principles are illustrated through study of the major metabolic pathways. How metabolism interacts with the nutritional environment is discussed throughout the module.


The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications This module aims to provide an understanding of the principles of metabolism encourage an appreciation of the diversity and interconnection of metabolic pathways, and to stimulate an understanding of the applicability of metabolism in a broad range of biological context.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Thursday afternoon
  • autumn semester - Thursday morning
  • spring semester - Thursday morning
  • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

The module aims to integrate areas of clinical medicine and nutrition, providing the basis for an understanding of the rationale for the formulation of dietetic treatment plans. To develop clinical and communication skills which students will require for professional practice.
It focuses on the dietary management of a range of conditions including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and irritable bowel syndrome.
It also covers methods of nutritional support. Students will become familiar with the model and process for nutrition and dietetic practice.
Students will also learn how to facilitate learning and promote self care through the delivery of group education.


Semester: autumn (15 credit)
Assessment: Case study (nutrition and dietetic care process) (50%) (2000 words) Three Progress Tests (3x30 mins) (50%)
80% attendance required, participation in group education role play
This module forms an essential part of practice based learning preparation.
Students must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition students must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester
  • summer studies
  • spring semester

Practice Based Learning 1 is a 2 week (11 day, 82.5 hours, 100% of the placement) simulated learning experience in dietetic practice providing the opportunity for learners to observe and begin to develop core skills in implementing the model and process for nutrition and dietetic practice with individuals in a variety of settings.
The purpose of the practical practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s dietetic judgment based on the clinical decision making process, through a focus on the integration and practical application of the knowledge and skills learnt in the university setting.
This module will be delivered as a simulated learning experience, facilitated both by academic staff and dietetic practice educators, from external dietetic teams.
The practice based learning modules are a compulsory component of the course.
If learners do not successfully meet the learning outcomes for all three practice based experiences, they will not meet the requirements for registration as a dietitian in the UK.
Students will demonstrate confidence, resilience, ambition and creativity and will act as inclusive, collaborative and socially responsible practitioners throughout this experience.
The practice-based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.
Brief Guidance Notes:
• Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice-based learning.
• Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
• If learners have additional learning needs identified on practice based learning such as a requirement for maths study skills or have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia they will be required to take appropriate corrective action prior to their next practice based learning. Guidance and support will be offered by the university through the academic tutor (AT) and practice based learning tutor.
• Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
• Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
• This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are eligible to apply to the register of health and care professionals on completion of BSc Dietetics and Nutrition/BSc Dietetics/PG Diploma/MSc Dietetics and Nutrition.
• Learners are not usually eligible for a repeat attempt of Practice Based Learning 1. If an individual learner fails to achieve the learning outcomes of Practice Based Learning 1 the learner should be counselled and advised on an alternative course route. (refer to course specific regulations within the relevant course specification)

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Friday morning
  • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

This module expands student knowledge on professional practice in a range of aspects of dietetics. Professional expectations and regulations for working within dietetics, including those related to professional competency, safeguarding and infection control are explored and applied in order to prepare students for placement 1. A specific focus on the legal and ethical issues and responsibilities within the dietetic profession will span all aspects of the module.

Roles of dietitians in different sectors are discussed with the opportunity to learn the principles of catering management within the public sector including methods of food provision, preparation, distribution, quality control, menu planning and the development, implementation and evaluation of nutritional standards for catering services. Students will undertake the type of report-writing that may be required in many areas of dietetic practice. Practical aspects of working as a dietitian will be considered throughout with an emphasis of constraints and strategies for overcoming these

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, this module will provide students with a knowledge of the principles of catering management within the public sector. In addition to this, students will gain an understanding of the clinical application of microbiology to dietetic practice and have the opportunity to apply knowledge of catering management and microbiological issues to relevant clinical scenarios. This module will also support students to apply their understanding of professional behaviour in accordance with the legal and ethical boundaries of the dietetic profession and the requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council. An introduction to the requirements of practice placements will also be provided. This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

This module provides a comprehensive overview of the principles of public health and public health policies. The application of nutrition intervention strategies and public health campaigns are explored. The module identifies quantitative and qualitative public health programmes. Key public health nutrition issues and the role of nutrition in health promotion across the lifespan is reviewed. This module addresses the direct and wider determinants of health and covers approaches to improve health at the community and population level. The module supports the development of your professional skills in public health and aligned with the Professional Codes Of Conducts such as those produced by AfN and HCPC..

1. You will develop an understanding of public health infrastructure and its role in the UK.
2. You will enhance your understanding of how nutrition policies and programmes are implemented.
3. You will assess the health needs of a population within a local authority in England and evaluate the public health and wellbeing strategies.
4. You will develop an understanding of the wider determinants of health and approaches to improve health inequalities at the community, national and international level.
5. You will be supported to develop professional skills necessary for employment in public health.

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies

Public Health Practice Based Learning is a 3 week (15 days, 112.5 hours, 100% direct ) learning experience in public health nutrition practice providing the opportunity for learners to observe and begin to develop core skills in assessing and identifying nutritional needs of populations to underpin planning, implementation and evaluation of public health nutrition interventions.
All practice based learning modules are undertaken in an approved setting which provides opportunity for learners to complete a suitable public health focused project. These are a variety of settings which may include government and non-government organisations, local authorities, NHS acute or community settings, schools, private companies, food banks and charities. Learners will be provided with adequate support through appropriately skilled site supervisors and/or university-based long arm supervision. The purpose of the practice-based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s ability to apply nutritional knowledge to practical scenarios.
The practice-based learning module is a compulsory component of the course.
The practice-based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career.
Brief Guidance Notes:
• Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice-based learning.
• Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice-based learning and university staff.
• Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice-based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
• Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice-based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice-based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice-based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice-based learning selection and what features are required of the practice-based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
• This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement to be awarded for courses eligible to undertake the module.
• Learners are not usually eligible for a repeat attempt of Public Health Practice Based Learning. If an individual learner fails to achieve the learning outcomes of Public Health Practice Based Learning, the learner should be counselled and advised on an alternative course route. (refer to course specific regulations within the relevant course specification)

Year 3 modules include:

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

This module provides an opportunity for learners to further develop their understanding and practice of the dietary management of disease. It also enables learners to develop their skills in undertaking one to one consultations, through development of their communication skills and application of the Nutrition and Dietetic Care Process. This module forms an essential part of practice-based learning preparation and provides an opportunity for learners to illustrate their understanding of the requirements by the Health and Care Professions Council, including the expectations of professional behaviour and demonstrate an ability to practise within the ethical and legal boundaries of the dietetic profession. Learners must pass this module before progressing to practice based learning 2 (dietitians).

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. More specifically the module aims to develop key knowledge, skills and professional attributes required to implement the Nutrition and Dietetic Care Process for individuals with a range of clinical conditions.

This module aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and, the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

DT6056
Nutrition through the lifecycle (Dietitians)
This module aims to:
• Explore the fundamental physiological and nutritional influences between genetic, physiological, environmental and nutritional influences on human growth and development throughout the lifespan.
• Learners will develop an awareness of the short and long-term consequences for growth and development if these factors are not optimal.
• The concept of nutritional assessment and surveillance and the evaluation of different nutritional assessment systems.
• Introduce indices of nutritional status and the use of reference standards.
• Provide opportunity for the evaluation of population and individual data of nutritional status including the collection and interpretation of anthropometric data.
• This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills
• necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility;
• decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature
Semester: year (15 credit)
Required prior learning: DT5051 Macro and micronutrients
Assessment: practical report (2000 words)(40%), progress unseen exam (1.5 hours)(60%).
Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester
  • summer studies
  • spring semester

Practice Based Learning 2 provides the opportunity for learners to build on their academic knowledge of nutrition and dietetics for individuals and groups in a range of environments. The learners will observe and practice the knowledge, skills and professional attributes required to implement the process for nutrition and dietetic practice with individuals and groups in a variety of settings.


Learners will experience different ways of communicating with a variety of people and practice skills that they will use throughout their careers. The learners will also establish links with practising dietitians in the area. They will acquire and demonstrate a range of skills which will be assessed against the British Dietetic Association Curriculum Framework.


All clinical practice based learning modules are undertaken using methods of simulated learning as well as in an approved dietetic setting which is primarily within an NHS organisation providing relevant patient care for example but not exclusively within acute, secondary, tertiary or community settings.


The model of simulation will be 24 days (172.8 hours, 40% of the overall placement) run as a combination of block simulation and collaborative learning.
The purpose of the practical practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s dietetic judgment based on the clinical decision making process, through a focus on the integration and practical application of the knowledge and skills learnt in the university setting.


Students will demonstrate confidence, resilience, ambition and creativity and will act as inclusive, collaborative and socially responsible practitioners throughout the module.


The practice based learning modules are a compulsory component of the course.


If learners do not successfully meet the learning outcomes for all three practice based experiences, they will not meet the requirements for registration as a dietitian in the UK.


The practice based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.


Brief Guidance Notes:
• Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice based learning.
• Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
• If learners have additional learning needs identified on practice based learning such as a requirement for maths study skills or have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia they will be required to take appropriate corrective action prior to their next practice based learning. Guidance and support will be offered by the university through the academic tutor (AT) and practice based learning tutor.
• Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
• Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
• This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are eligible to apply to the register of health and care professionals on completion of BSc Dietetics and Nutrition/BSc Dietetics/PG Diploma/MSc Dietetics and Nutrition.
• Please refer to section 13: Description of assessment items for details of placement verification and procedures in the event of placement failure.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

This module characterises the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical investigation and treatment of selected systems diseases that make a significant contribution to morbidity and mortality within healthcare. Aspects covered begin with an overview of pathology, followed by a systems approach to disease, including cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, immune disorders, obesity, diabetes, inborn errors of metabolism, nutritional deficiencies, and cancer
The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. More specifically the module aims to provide an opportunity for in-depth study of selected body systems with reference to the pathogenesis of disease, its diagnosis and therapeutic options. The module will also highlight the pivotal role of pathology in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of disease. In addition students will be shown how body structure and function continues to change throughout the lifespan with reference to the increasing incidence and pathophysiology of selected “age-related” systems diseases. Students’ ability to research and evaluate biomedical issues and present their findings in a cogent manner will be developed.
This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and, the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

This module currently runs:
  • autumn semester - Monday morning

DT6063 - Techniques in Dietetic and Nutrition Research

This module focuses on the concepts and techniques used within audit and research, focussing on the application of these within the field of dietetics. Learners will develop an appreciation for different types of methodological approaches to research and audit, within a core subject matter for dietetics and nutrition.
The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to introduce the concepts of research methodology and professional conduct in a nutrition and dietetic context to enable them to prepare for their final year project. This module will support learners as they consider how to seek future employment. This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making encompassing research, service evaluation and clinical audit.
Autumn Semester
I. Assessment: Oral presentation (40%) (10 minutes) of a critical appraisal of published research.
II. Coursework (60%) (1500 words) which requires learners to design a proposal and protocol for a given topic area

Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components.

Year 4 modules include:

This module currently runs:
  • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

This module teaches and consolidates learning of all areas of nutrition and dietetics to develop and consolidate learning on campus and during placements. Students will be required to apply clinical measurement data and interpret the physiological abnormalities of specific case studies to formulate dietetic assessments and care plans as well as demonstrate knowledge and skills in undertaking public health nutrition strategies. Students will be required to demonstrate an ability to practise within the ethical and legal boundaries of the dietetic profession.

The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. More specifically the module aims to consolidate and develop nutrition and dietetic knowledge and skills to ensure consistency of knowledge and ability prior to graduation. This module prepares students for recruitment and selection processes in the NHS and future employment as it consolidates and develops all prior learning so that students are fully prepared to take on the demands of a graduate entrant dietitian. This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment such as: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature. This module forms an essential part of preparation for employment.

This module currently runs:
  • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

The module aims to provide the learners with an opportunity to develop the skills of critical appraisal, interpretation, analysis, defending and reflection through the design and/or execution of a dietetics and nutrition-focused research project.
In addition the module will develop advanced level knowledge of a specific area of the subject and allow learners to integrate the knowledge and skills acquired from other modules.
Learners will be able to develop skills in employability allowing the opportunity to demonstrate competence as independent learners, through the design and/or execution and completion of the research project.
In addition the learner will experience the process of nutrition research and develop professional, vocational and transferable skills to perform and present independent research.
Learners will produce a substantive professional scientific report on the findings and present these findings, orally, in a scientific manner.
This module aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and, the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies
  • spring semester - Monday morning

DT6062:
Management of Health and Social Care
This module provides learners with an understanding of the organisational infrastructure of public sector organisations. Context is provided through relevant local,
regional and national social and administrative policy for both employment as well as for the provision of healthcare and social services. Management structures relevant to the dietetic professions are explored. The module aims to develop learning and practical tools to support experiences encountered during employment. It complements theory of government policies relevant to healthcare covered in modules such as

Clinical Dietetics 1 and 2 and Applied Public Health and Nutrition.
The module aims to provide learners with an understanding of the management and organisation of public sector organisations. In addition learners will learn about commissioning, business planning, financial management and marketing as well as the management of governance and risk within healthcare. Learners will also further develop their knowledge and understanding of continuous professional development, career pathways and management and leadership styles.


Spring Semester


Assessment: Business Case (2500 words) (50%) Oral Presentation (10 minutes) (50%)

This module forms an essential part of preparation for employment. Learners must obtain at least 40% to pass this module. In addition learners must normally obtain at least 35% in each component of assessment within this module. A mark of between 35% and 39% may be compensated by other components

This module currently runs:
  • summer studies
  • autumn semester
  • spring semester

Practice Based Learning 3 is an 11 week practice based learning providing the opportunity for learners to observe and develop core skills in implementing the dietetic care process with individuals and groups in a variety of settings.


They will experience different ways of communicating with a variety of people and practice skills that they will use throughout their careers. The learners will also establish links with practising dietitians in the area. They will acquire and demonstrate a range of skills which will be assessed against the British Dietetic Association Curriculum Framework.


All clinical practice based learning modules are undertaken through simulation and in an approved dietetic setting which is primarily within an NHS organisation providing relevant patient care for example but not exclusively within acute, secondary, tertiary or community settings.


The length of time and model of simulation will be 13 days (93.6 hours, 24% of the overall placement) run as a combination of block simulation and collaborative learning. Students will spend the final 3 weeks of their placement solely within the NHS organisation they have been allocated to consolidate their skills and knowledge.


The purpose of the practical practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s dietetic judgment based on the clinical decision making process, through a focus on the integration and practical application of the knowledge and skills learnt in the university setting.


Demonstrate confidence, resilience, ambition and creativity and will act as inclusive, collaborative and socially responsible practitioners throughout this module.
The practice based learning modules are a compulsory component of the course.


If learners do not successfully meet the learning outcomes for all three practice based modules, they will not meet the requirements for registration as a dietitian in the UK.


The practice based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.


Brief Guidance Notes:
• Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice based learning.
• Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
• If learners have additional learning needs identified on practice based learning such as a requirement for maths study skills or have specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia or dyspraxia they will be required to take appropriate corrective action prior to their next practice based learning. Guidance and support will be offered by the university through the academic tutor (AT) and practice based learning tutor.
• Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
• Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
• This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement of the course to ensure that learners are eligible to apply to the register of health and care professionals on completion of BSc Dietetics and Nutrition/BSc Dietetics/PG Diploma/MSc Dietetics and Nutrition.
• Please refer to section 13: Description of assessment items for details of placement verification and procedures in the event of placement failure.

What our students say

"London Met is a very inclusive university, I felt at home there as a mature student (25) when I started studying."

Bianca Tharme-Loose, Dietetics and Nutrition BSc graduate, 2022. Read more about Bianca's studies.

"The education and support provided by the dietetics team was second to none. Also, feeling like a part of the NHS team during the pandemic was such a rewarding time to give back. I graduated in July 2021, and by the end of July I had two job offers to work at local hospitals."
Karmen Paige, Dietetics and Nutrition BSc graduate, 2021. Read more about Karmen's studies.

"I wanted to stay in London and was nervous about going back to university as a mature student. London Met was the answer to all my concerns. I was blessed to be offered a fully-funded Dietetics and Nutrition BSc place. That was the start of an amazing four-year journey at London Met. The course really prepared me to go straight out into the working world."
Egheosa Abifade RD, Dietetics and Nutrition BSc graduate, 2020. Read more about Egheosa' experience on the course

"The lecturers have been helpful throughout the course. You can tell they are passionate about what they do and this helps us to learn in class. Their feedback is very prompt, which is useful for our studies."
National Student Survey (NSS)

"The course has been brilliant, I have definitely learnt a lot from it. The guest lectures have been inspirational too. I feel very excited to be preparing for work in this field."
National Student Survey (NSS)

Where this course can take you

Graduating from our Dietetics and Nutrition BSc (Hons) course is the start of an exciting and varied career in nutrition, health and disease management.

Our health science graduates have gone into various health care professions including acute, community, obesity and HIV specialist dieticans, health advisers, sports coaches and PE teachers in organisations including King's College Hosptial, Bupa, Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital, various other NHS organisations and The Food Chain.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Funding

You may be eligible for funding of up to £5,000 per year, which you won't have to pay back, through the NHS Training Grant.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK applicant wanting to study full-time starting in September, you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified. If you're an international applicant wanting to study full-time, you can choose to apply via UCAS or directly to the University.

If you're applying for part-time study, you should apply directly to the University. If you require a Student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.



When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

To find out when teaching for this degree will begin, as well as welcome week and any induction activities, view our academic term dates.

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