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Human Nutrition - BSc (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Our teaching plans for autumn 2021 Entry requirements Modular structure What our students say Where this course can take you How to apply

Why study this course?

If you're passionate about improving human health through better nutrition and disease prevention, then this course, accredited by the Association for Nutrition, will give you an excellent grounding in both scientific and applied public health nutrition. During this course you’ll have the opportunity to take part in hands-on laboratory sessions in our state-of-the-art, £30 million Science Centre, which features specialist nutritional physiology and food technology labs.

This course received a 100% overall student satisfaction score in the National Student Survey 2020.

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More about this course

This degree course addresses how diet, lifestyle and physical activity contribute to health, wellbeing and the prevention of major modifiable diseases. While the UK and most of the developed world are experiencing the longest lifespans of their populations, they’re also experiencing near epidemic levels of chronic non-communicable diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Diet and lifestyle are key modifiable factors that drive these diseases.

You’ll enhance your research, practical and academic skills, and graduate with the necessary grounding to go on to a career in the NHS, or in the broader public or private sector. Offering a programme of study and training for a career in public health or sports nutrition, you'll be eligible for registration as a Registered Associate Nutritionist with the Association for Nutrition.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through essays, posters, examinations, online multiple-choice tests, scientific reports, individual and group research projects and presentations, and a final dissertation.

Professional accreditation

On graduation, you'll be eligible to join the Association for Nutrition as a Registered Associate Nutritionist (ANutr).

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code B400
Entry requirements View
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Our teaching plans for autumn 2021

We are planning to return to our usual ways of teaching this autumn including on-campus activities for your course. However, it's still unclear what the government requirements on social distancing and other restrictions might be, so please keep an eye on our Covid-19 pages for further updates as we get closer to the start of the autumn term.

Entry requirements

In addition to the University's minimum entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of 112 points from A levels including a C in Biology or Human Biology or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification  eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Progression Diploma or Access to HE Diploma with 60 credits
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSEs at grade C/grade 4 or above, (or equivalent).

Entry from appropriate foundation and access courses will also be considered. We accept a broad range of equivalent level qualifications, please check the UCAS tariff calculator or contact us if you are unsure if you meet the minimum entry requirements for this course. We encourage applications from international/EU students with equivalent qualifications.

If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Human Nutrition (including foundation year) BSc (Hons).

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Any university-level qualifications or relevant experience you gain prior to starting university could count towards your course at London Met. Find out more about applying for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL).

English language requirements

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2021/22 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces students to the theoretical and practical aspects of human anatomy and physiology in health and disease. It is designed for life-science students with an interest in human biology, but particularly for those wishing to pursue advanced studies in the Biosciences or Forensic Science.
    This module aims to provide students, through lectures, tutorials and practical classes, with a sound knowledge of human body structure using appropriate anatomical nomenclature and an in-depth understanding of the physiology of selected body systems. The module will also aim to introduce basic concepts in immunology and pathology.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    Through successful completion of the module, learners will develop a broad understanding of psychology in relation to health and nutrition behaviour. Learners will also further develop skills in professionalism such as presenting skills and team working.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    Specifically, it aims to provide learners with knowledge and understanding of the psychological theories relevant to the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Also, the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency for Dietitians and Association for Nutrition Code of Ethics and Statement of Professional Conduct for nutritionists.

    Relevant aspects of nutrition & dietetic practice, theory and research will also be studied. This module also aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    The module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s, Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function. This module aims to provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    A core module which provides students with an understanding of basic cell structures and an awareness of different cell types and relates the structure and activities of cell components to their functions and to cellular activities as a whole.
    The second half of the module is concerned with biochemistry focusing on the properties of key biochemical molecules and their role in biochemical function.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to expose students to some of the key questions of cell biology concerning cell structure and intracellular activities. Provide students with practical experience in a range of laboratory-based biological techniques. Enhance students' ability to manage themselves and to develop organisational, critical and analytical skills which are applicable to the workplace.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    Through successful completion of the module, learners will develop a broad understanding of sociology in relation to health and nutrition behaviour.

    Learners will also begin to develop skills in professionalism and have a better understanding of employment opportunities and job application processes.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

    Specifically, it aims to provide learners with knowledge and understanding of sociology relevant to the practice of nutrition and dietetics. Also, the Health Care and Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency for Dietitians and Association for Nutrition (AfN) Code of Ethics and Statement of Professional Conduct for nutritionists.

    This module will support learners to reflect on the range of employment opportunities available. Relevant aspects of nutrition & dietetic practice, theory and research will also be studied. This module also aims to provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The module develops an understanding of human nutrition science which includes an introduction to the nutrient and non-nutrient components of foods, their main metabolic and physiological roles, and main food sources in the diet. It introduces knowledge of the nutritional composition of foods, the food groups, the concept of energy and energy balance, dietary reference values, and the importance of diet in health and disease through the lifecycle. In addition, the nutritional and physiological factors which impinge on food choice are explored.

    This module underpins the human nutrition content and thread of the course and encourages engagement with nutrition science from the outset. It ensures that students are equally equipped with basic nutrition science concepts, regardless of their entry-level understanding, before engaging in more complex aspects in subsequent years. The students start to develop skills in: ingredient, meal and diet analysis; calculating the absolute and relative nutritive value of foods and meals; a basic understanding of food labels, including nutrition and health claims; simple food preparation and cooking; and an understanding of how aspects of food preparation can affect nutritional quality. Nutrients, foods, diets, and their effects are considered from a global and UK perspective reflecting the globalisation of the food chain, the diversity of our students, and their future employability.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of energy and nitrogen balance in humans, as well as the concepts of nutrient essentiality and requirements. Energy and nutrient balance are fundamental concepts in nutritional science and underpin the theory and applied practice of managing overweight, obesity and undernutrition. Over the duration of this module, students will gain an understanding of how energy expenditure in humans is conceptualised, and how energy expenditure is affected by endogenous and exogenous factors. This module also covers the principles of techniques used for the measurement of metabolic balance and turnover rates digestion and transport, and the significance of body pools of energy and nutrients.
    This module presents students with an opportunity to apply nutritional theory in practice through an energy balance experiment.

    Teaching period: Spring.
    Assessment: A scientific report of 2000 words (which explores energy balance) and an unseen exam (1 hour).
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, it aims to develop a critical understanding of energy and nitrogen balance and their contribution to human nutritional status. To apply this understanding to practical situations where there are implications for human health, for example, obesity, starvation and cachexia. This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    Food Safety and Microbiology
    Semester: Spring
    Module pre-requisites: NU4005 (Human Nutrition)
    Assessments: Online assessment (3 x 20 minutes in-class tests) (50%), Food Microbiology Laboratory report (1500 words) (50%).

    This module looks at the microbial world and how microorganisms could cause food spoilage and foodborne diseases as well as contributing towards preservation of our food. The major microorganisms in food and their characteristics will be discussed, focusing on intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting their growth in food. The module discusses in some detail how microorganisms are controlled through food preservation and food processing methods. In addition, the module contains laboratory practicals on basic food microbiology.
    The module also focusses on the effects on nutrients and anti-nutrients of processing and preservation. The basics of food research techniques and food labelling will be discussed.

    The overall aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module aims to give learners insight into how and why foods are processed and the effects of processing on nutrients. It also covers the principles of food spoilage and preservation and hygiene and safety of the food. The module also seeks to develop competence in discussion and written work, encouraging clarity and scientific rigour.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    Food Science
    Semester: Autumn
    Module pre-requisites: NU4005 (Human Nutrition)
    Assessments: Progress Tests (x2, 30 min each) (40%), Nutritional Analysis Report (2000 words) (60%).

    This module covers the major food groups, developing an understanding of the chemistry, biochemistry and physical properties of foods and food components in relation to the production, processing, preparation and consumption of foods, and the way food commodities may be manufactured, placing the food industry in a nutritional context. The module also focusses on how commodity groups are processed into foods. Food sustainability and current trends will be highlighted. The module contains a series of laboratory practicals on the proximate analysis of foods (e.g. moisture, fat, protein), and the measurement of food energy.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. This module aims to give students an insight into the biochemistry of foods as key commodities and their manufacture and analysis of nutrient content. In addition, how and why foods are processed. The module also seeks to develop competence in discussion and written work, encouraging clarity and scientific rigour; tools often used in many employment settings, which will facilitate progression to higher level modules.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module focuses on understanding key principles of metabolism. These principles are illustrated through study of the major metabolic pathways. How metabolism interacts with the nutritional environment is discussed throughout the module.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications This module aims to provide an understanding of the principles of metabolism encourage an appreciation of the diversity and interconnection of metabolic pathways, relate these to nutritional status and to stimulate an understanding of the applicability of metabolism in a broad range of biological context. This module will also provide learners with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    Vitamins and minerals are essential for life. While they do not yield energy directly, they are essential to many metabolic pathways and support human life and health. This module explores the functions of vitamins and minerals in human beings, identifying the roles of micronutrients in metabolic pathways and the importance of nutrition in maintaining the human body in a healthy state. This module covers the biochemical aspects of a range of vitamins, minerals and trace elements and includes dietary sources, chemistry, metabolic functions, storage, turnover and consequences of imbalanced micronutrient intakes.

    Teaching period: Autumn

    Assessment: 3x 20-minute web-based multiple-choice progress tests (an average mark is taken) and an unseen exam (1 hour).
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, it aims to develop a critical understanding of the physiology and biochemistry of micronutrients. To demonstrate the metabolic consequences of insufficient and excessive nutrient intakes in human nutrition. This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    Public Health Nutrition
    Semester: Spring (15 credits)
    Module pre-requisites: NU4005 Human Nutrition, DT4056 Health, Society and Behaviour, DT4057 Applied Health Psychology

    Through successful completion of the module, students will learn the theory and application of public health nutrition and will understand the process of developing and evaluating public health nutrition interventions.

    I. Assessment: On-line test (30%) (30 minutes)
    II. Coursework (70%) (1500 words)

    Module Aims:
    1. Develop an understanding of Public health infrastructure and its role in the UK.

    2. Be able to appraise the role of cultural, socio economic and psychological factors in health outcomes.
    3. Increase knowledge and understanding of the methods used for acquiring and interpreting nutritional and epidemiological information on a population level.
    4. Be able to gather and analyse population health data.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • summer studies

    Public Health Practice Based Learning is a 3 week learning experience in public health nutrition practice providing the opportunity for learners to observe and begin to develop core skills in assessing and identifying nutritional needs of populations to underpin planning, implementation and evaluation of public health nutrition interventions.
    All practice based learning modules are undertaken in an approved setting which provides opportunity for learners to complete a suitable public health focused project. These are a variety of settings which may include government and non-government organisations, local authorities, NHS acute or community settings, schools, private companies, food banks and charities. Learners will be provided with adequate support through appropriately skilled site supervisors and/or university-based long arm supervision. The purpose of the practice based learning component of the course is to develop the learner’s ability to apply nutritional knowledge to practical scenarios.
    The practice based learning module is a compulsory component of the course.
    The practice based learning modules provide opportunity for the learners to develop specific work skills and valuable professional relationships that prepare them for their future career as a dietitian.
    Brief Guidance Notes:
    • Where significant health problems have arisen an occupational health assessment will be required at any time prior to or during the practice based learning.
    • Student services are available to provide counselling and other support mechanisms as required. Learners will have to take action on advice from their practice based learning and university staff.
    • Learners who have requirements which impact on their ability to take up practice based learnings in particular locations (due to a protected characteristic as defined by the Equality Act (2010)) should register with the University’s Disability and Dyslexia Service as recommendations relating to reasonable adjustments made by this service will also be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation. Practice based learnings have experience of managing additional needs and reasonable adjustments will be put in place.
    • Learners have the opportunity to indicate on their practice based learning application form any carer responsibilities which may impact their ability to take up specific practice based learnings. Learners must provide details of their carer responsibilities and provide supporting evidence to their practice based learning tutor prior to the point of allocation. Learners should outline clearly how their carer responsibilities impact on their practice based learning selection and what features are required of the practice based learning. Providing this information will not guarantee that the learner will be allocated to one of their preferences but the learner’s circumstances will be considered at the time the learner is selected for allocation.
    • This module does not provide academic credit but successful completion is an essential requirement to be awarded for courses eligible to undertake the module.
    • Learners are not usually eligible for a repeat attempt of Public Health Practice Based Learning. If an individual learner fails to achieve the learning outcomes of Public Health Practice Based Learning, the learner should be counselled and advised on an alternative course route. (refer to course specific regulations within the relevant course specification)

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module focuses on the concepts and techniques used in nutritional science and research. It covers dietary assessment methodology and broad principles of epidemiology in the context of nutrition and dietetics. The module supports on-going development of professional skills.

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to develop a critical understanding of the use of dietary assessment methods for assessing nutrient intake in individuals and in populations and to apply the use of appropriate dietary assessment tools in nutrition and dietetic professional practice and in research. It will also introduce health statistics and data, this will aid development and understanding concepts regarding nutritional epidemiology.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    This module focuses on the concepts of techniques used in nutritional science and research. It covers the principles of research methodology including study design, introduction to statistics in the context of nutrition. Ideas are formulated in preparation for the project in the final year. The module supports on-going development of professional skills.
    This module will support students as they consider how to seek future employment. This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to introduce the concepts and principles used in nutrition epidemiology and develop the students’ understanding of the interaction of diet, food and nutrition in the causation and prevention of health and disease. To develop the students’ ability to utilise and critically evaluate the research tools used in nutrition epidemiology and appreciate these implications when evaluating the evidence for public health policies. This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module integrates student’s prior knowledge of nutritional physiology and biochemistry, food science and nutritional assessment, to then apply this knowledge to develop a critical understudying of the major global nutritional issues, focusing primarily on undernutrition. It addresses the role of various international agencies, agriculture, energy and micronutrient deficiencies, surveillance systems and emergency nutrition interventions. Food security and sustainability are key themes throughout the module. This module complements the focus of the course on public health and over nutrition and aims to complete the breadth of knowledge and skills of an associate registered nutritionist. This module will contribute to the pathway leading to employment in the international nutrition arena. It will develop skills in the identification of, and intervention in situations of food shortage and nutrient deficiencies as well as policy formulation and implementation.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    This module allows students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained at other levels and demonstrate competence as independent learners by undertaking a critical review or a research project
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to introduce, and enable the student to acquire, skills and capabilities appropriate to nutrition research
    To develop a critical appreciation of the process of the research technique with emphasis on error, bias, confounding factors, validity, reproducibility and precision
    To consolidate the understanding and appropriate use of statistical analyses in research and the use of statistical software packages
    To integrate the knowledge and skills acquired from other modules
    To search, access and retrieve background information using appropriate databases such as Web of Knowledge and Medline
    To produce a substantive professional scientific report on the findings.
    This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility, decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module aims to:
    • Explore the fundamental physiological and nutritional influences between genetic, physiological, environmental and nutritional influences on human growth and development throughout the lifespan.
    • Students will develop an awareness of the short and long-term consequences for growth and development if these factors are not optimal.
    • The concept of nutritional assessment and surveillance and the evaluation of different nutritional assessment systems.
    • Introduce indices of nutritional status and the use of reference standards.
    • Provide opportunity for the evaluation of population and individual data of nutritional status including the collection and interpretation of anthropometric data.
    • This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills
    • necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility;
    • decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature
    Semester: year (15 credit)

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    This module requires students to integrate their knowledge of nutritional physiology and biochemistry and to apply this knowledge to develop a critical understudying of the nutritional and practical dietary needs of sports people and athletes. It includes discussion of different sporting groups and exercise types; macro- and micronutrient requirements; hydration; ergogenic aids; practical dietary considerations in relation to training and competition; policy; current issues and research in sports nutrition. This module contributes to the broad experience, knowledge and practice of a nutrition graduate and provides the specialist academic knowledge and evidence-based practical skills to enter employment in the sports nutrition field. Examples of key skills include nutritional and dietary assessment of individuals engaged in sport and exercise, dietary advice and counselling and sports club policy formulation.
    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically it aims to enable students to gain a critical understanding of the nutritional and practical dietary needs of sports people and athletes. Integrate the knowledge and skills acquired from other modules. Encourage independent learning through the access of background information using appropriate primary and secondary sources. Develop and encourage confidence in the use of appropriate learning, critical and discursive skills Develop competence in discussion, oral presentation and written work, encouraging clarity of presentation and scientific rigour.
    This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility; decision making in potentially complex contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    Work-related Practice for Nutritionists
    Semester: Autumn (15 credits)
    Module Pre-requisites: NU4005 Human Nutrition, NU5059 Food Science and NU5079 Public Health Nutrition

    This module extends and develops students' learning experience by providing opportunity to develop, reflect and evaluate the knowledge and skills required for nutrition work related practice. There will be opportunity to experience work within a nutrition
    practice environment.

    I. Assessment: Nutrition Education Resource (40%)
    II. Portfolio (60%).

    The aims of this module are aligned with the qualification descriptors within the Quality Assurance Agency’s Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Specifically, it aims to provide the student with an opportunity to gain experience of the culture and structure of a working environment related to the student’s area of academic study; evaluate, and critically reflect on, the workplace as well as the student's role and contribution to it. Apply academic knowledge to employment tasks. This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility and decision making.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Thursday morning
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 1 (Level 5) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module aims to integrate the biochemical and physiological aspects of energy balance and how energy homeostasis may be regulated with reference to clinical metabolic disorders and obesity. This module will also provide students with the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility; decision making in complex and unpredictable contexts; and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature

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What our students say

“I found the course in Human Nutrition at London Met very well structured. The first year allowed me to build my knowledge in science. In years 2 and 3, the course focused on several areas of nutrition sciences, from microbiology to the relationship between diet and disease.

The lectures were very interesting and allowed me to learn how to put the theory I was learning into practice. The course also included sessions in the science laboratory, which were fun and educational.

My lecturers were very well prepared, supportive and had an inspiring passion for nutrition. The multicultural environment at London Met allowed me to meet students from all over the world, and it contributed to making my 3 years at university unique.”

Adriana Sparano, Human Nutrition BSC, 2019

Where this course can take you

You'll complete the course equipped to pursue a career as a public health nutritionist in the public sector, in local and national government, in the charity sector or in the academic and research sector.

Previous graduates have gone on to work at organisations such as Nestlé Health Science, the NHS, The Nutrition Society, the World Obesity Federation. Others do consulting and contract work as nutritionists.

This course is also excellent preparation for further research or study.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

September 2021: If you’re a UK student or an EU student with settled/pre-settled status and want to study full-time from September, you can apply through Clearing – call 0800 032 4441 or apply online. If you're an international applicant or want to study part-time, select the relevant entry point and click the "Apply direct" button.

Applying for 2021

If you're from the UK, or you're from the EU and have settled or pre-settled status, apply through Clearing for courses starting in September 2021 – call 0800 032 4441 or apply online.

Applying for 2022

If you're a UK applicant wanting to study full-time starting in September, you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified. If you're an international applicant wanting to study full-time, you can choose to apply via UCAS or directly to the University.

If you're applying for part-time study, you should apply directly to the University. If you require a Student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.



When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

To find out when teaching for this degree will begin, as well as welcome week and any induction activities, view our academic term dates.

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