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LLB (Criminal Law) - (Hons)

Why study this course?

The LLB (Hons) degree from London Metropolitan University has an emphasis on Criminal Law and Litigation. Attaining this degree provides an excellent opportunity for early specialism in this important area of legal practice.


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The LLB Hons (Criminal Law) is a fully recognised Qualifying Law Degree which gives you the early opportunity to specialise in aspects of Criminal Law.

This course is especially well suited for those looking to become criminal lawyers, police officers or work within the Crown Prosecution Service. However, you won't be restricted to this sector, as your degree will be equally valid for any field of legal professional practice.

As well as studying and researching some fascinating and niche areas of the Criminal Justice system – well beyond what you will study in the traditional LLB Foundations of Criminal Law course – you'll get the opportunity to practise your advocacy skills in our purpose built court room.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through case studies, essays, examinations, presentations and research projects. These assessments allow you to develop and demonstrate a wide range of skills and knowledge which may be invaluable for further study or career.

Professional accreditation

The degree is recognised as a Qualifying Law Degree by both the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate Access or preparatory courses or have appropriate work experience.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (January start) - Thursday morning

    The Law of Contract is a core module for the LL.B. courses and the BA in Law, which introduces students to the key principles of the Law of Contract, which is one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    As well as studying the traditional principles of offer, acceptance, consideration and third party rights, students will also consider other such practical topics as terms, misrepresentation, frustration, exemption clauses and remedies for breach of contract.

    Students will develop their skills in reading and understanding primary and secondary sources of law; and practise the practical and professional skills of legal research, legal analysis and legal writing.

    The module is relevant and very important for a range of careers in law, commerce and industry.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday morning

    Criminal Law is a core module for the LL.B. courses and the BA in Law, which introduces students to the key principles of Criminal Law, which is one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    The module provides an academic introduction to fundamental rules of criminal law, including the key principles of a number of criminal offences. Criminal law affects many aspects of human behaviour and interaction but has complex definitions. This module aims to help students to understand the changing landscape of criminal law as well as some of the major debates in the subject.

    It also teaches and assesses key skills of analysis, academic writing and legal research in the context of criminal law. It does this by emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of criminal law (legal judgments and Acts of Parliament as well as Parliamentary Papers and academic journal articles).

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The Law of Tort is a core module for the LL.B. courses and the BA in Law, which introduces students to the key principles of the Law of Tort, which is one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    This module focuses on developing skills of legal analysis, communication and reasoning. It introduces students to the law of torts through a detailed study of negligence and the social context in which this tort operates. This is followed by a study of other forms of tortious liability.

    Students will learn to apply their understanding to problem solving, as well as learning to communicate in a concise, accurate and effective manner.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday morning

    Legal System is a core module for the LL.B. courses and the BA in Law, which introduces students to the workings of the English Legal System in its historical, contemporary and international context.

    It includes the study of the sources of law, the law making process, the institutional and court structure, the legal profession and the roles of legal actors within the English Legal system.

    It also enables students to start to acquire the fundamental academic and professional skills necessary for the undergraduate study of law. In this way, it provides a solid support both for the other first year modules, and also for the remainder of the degree course and beyond into professional practice.

    Students learn how to locate legal material; to read and understand primary and secondary sources of law (paper based and electronic); and to recognise and develop at an introductory level the practical and professional legal skills of advocacy, legal research and legal writing. These skills are be applied in the context of primary legal materials used in their other modules.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This core LLB unit provides a detailed understanding of the underlying concepts of European Union Law and its topical relationship to UK domestic law.

    It considers the law-making powers of the EU institutions, the constitutional principles of the EU, the direct effect of EU law, indirect effect and the principle of State Liability and the key role of the European Court of Justice in relation to preliminary references from domestic courts, enforcement actions against Member States, judicial review of EU law and its development of human rights. It highlights the interplay between these features by focusing on substantive EU topics such as the fundamental freedoms of the free movement of goods, persons and the important area of Competition Law.

    The aims of the module are to give students an appreciation of the theoretical and foundational aspects of EU law as it applies in the UK. The module facilitates a contextual and critical appreciation of the law and politics relating to the administration and governance of the UK State in a period of radical constitutional change (‘Brexit’).

    The module provides a sound understanding of the key features of the EU legal order, its main institutions, the law-making processes and the legal control of administrative powers in the EU and the UK.

    It will provide a sound understanding of the relationship between history, politics, law and economics in the development of the EU.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent
    research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of the Law of the European Union, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    Property Law is a core module for the LL.B. courses, which introduces students to the key principles of the law relating to real property, one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    It introduces and builds up a critical understanding of the legal concepts regarding the ownership and co-ownership of land in England and Wales and the control of assets. Students study the system of registered and unregistered land; the rules relating to the transfer of title; and the controls on land use.

    Leases, licences, mortgages, easements, restrictive freehold covenants, adverse possession, conveyancing, human rights and torts relating to property will likewise be explained and analysed.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of land law, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of land law.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module provides a contextual introduction to the central areas of UK Public Law. It provides a detailed examination of the history, nature and workings of the UK’s constitution. It also considers the principles of administrative law with particular emphasis on the procedure and substantive grounds for judicial review in English law.

    The aims of the module are to provide students with a working knowledge and understanding of the evolving framework of legal and non-legal obligations which apply between the State and the citizen and between different organs of the State/government.

    It will enable students to develop a critical understanding of the extent and efficiency of control on governmental bodies, in particular, the legitimacy and extent of parliamentary and judicial oversight mechanisms. It will enable students to apply legal principles to theoretical examples in order to draw conclusions and give advice to the citizen.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent
    research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of UK public law and human rights, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills, group participation skills and IT skills (for both research and presentation).

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 2 (Level 6) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The Work Placement for Professional Experience module provides students with an opportunity to experience working in a legal context, to develop the skills and abilities necessary for a graduate career, to identify their strengths and weaknesses and how they might improve their performance, and to apply theoretical legal knowledge to cases in the real world.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    Consumer Rights Law is a 30-week module providing students with a thorough understanding of modern consumer rights in relation to the acquisition of goods and services. As well as studying the traditional requirements of a sale of goods contract, students will also examine the laws of consumer financing and credit, statutory liability for dangerous and defective products, the law regarding the unfair trading practices and the principles and responsibility for regulation of the consumer market.

    The module will be of interest to all students who wish to develop a comprehensive understanding of modern consumer rights and responsibilities in relation to goods, services and digital content. The module is relevant to a range of careers in law, retailing and consumer advice and marketing of goods and services.

    The module aims to provide a detailed, critical and evaluative knowledge of laws which regulate modern commerce; enable students to appreciate the regulation of the consumer market and create an awareness of consumer advice roles.

    There will be a formative in-class assessment which will test the students’ basic understanding of key legal principles and concepts. This will be designed to ensure that their knowledge is adequate for the summative assessments to follow.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module will focus on the legal relationship between employers and workers as well as the law relating to the prohibition of discrimination both within and outside the employment context. The module examines the diverse nature of individual employment relationships, the content of the contract of employment and the remedies available to the parties on its termination.

    The module aims to:

    • outline the EU laws and the domestic statutory and common law provisions which govern the employment relationship between employers and employees and employers and workers;

    • give opportunities for critical examination of domestic and EU statute and case law related to the prohibition of discrimination because of sex, race, disability and other protected characteristics;

    • facilitate the development of students’ practical knowledge of employment and equality law through independent research and application to hypothetical problem questions;

    • enable students to develop a critical understanding of employment and equality law through analysis of the social and economic context in which the law has developed;
    • enable students to develop their oral presentation skills in a supportive atmosphere in seminars;

    • enable students to develop their professional skills through observation of tribunal proceedings.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    Advocacy is a key skill for lawyers, diplomats and anyone else in a management position where powers of persuasion – especially of contentious issues - are fundamental to success.

    Mooting is the time-honoured method of teaching practical advocacy to lawyers who hope to make a career out of representing clients in the appellate courts.

    Even lawyers who do not engage in the dramatics of court-work need to be able to use their advocacy skills in conferences with clients and their opponents, which is why advocacy training is key to most vocational law courses.

    This module analyses the traditional tenets of Aristotelian teaching on advocacy, and then applies them to realistic case-study situations where the students are placed in the position of the counsel in various appeal cases, and must demonstrate both their written and oral skills of persuasion to convince the judge of the merits of their case.

    Through a series of practical and group exercises, the module aims to teach and develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, synthesis of legal material, legal drafting, oral communication and group teamwork.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development of these skills, especially in
    relation to students who wish to pursue a career involving contentious litigation, court
    advocacy or diplomacy.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    The Law of Evidence concerns the information which it is permitted to use to enable the claimant or prosecution to establish their case against a defendant, or to enable the defendant to refute the allegations made against him.

    It is not every supposed fact that may be brought in evidence in a trial, as the court has limited time and resources to hear everything – however trivial – that the parties might wish to throw into the debate, and there are a host of issues relating to such matters as unfairness or undue prejudice (especially to the defendant in a criminal case), mistakes, unreliability of witnesses, human rights and public policy which might impact on the propriety of permitting certain statements or documents to be admitted as evidence.

    This module examines the rules and ethics of the law of evidence, which have arisen both at common law and under statute, and invites to students critically to analyse these principles both in a theoretical context, and by practical application to realistic case-studies.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, legal drafting and academic writing in the context of the law of evidence, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development of these skills, especially in
    relation to students who wish to pursue a career involving contentious litigation, court
    advocacy or law enforcement agencies such as the police force.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    “Medical paternalism no longer rules.” per Lord Steyn in Chester v. Afshar [2005] 1 AC 134

    In the current millennium, the public have become increasingly aware of their rights in respect of medical treatment, including the right to be informed of the potential consequences of any treatment, and the right to question the competence and expertise of medical professionals.

    In this module, students will critically examine the principles of tort, criminal law and human rights law which balance the relationship between patients and healthcare workers, studying such matters as consent, patient confidentiality, mental capacity, the right to live and the right to die.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of medical law, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    This is a dynamic, contemporary subject, which forms the basis of several successful legal practices, and so may have a tangible career benefit for students interested in this sector of law.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Civil Liberties and Human Rights introduces students to the key principles of the law relating to civil liberties and human rights.

    The module gives a clear, coherent and up to date account of the law of human rights and civil liberties, concentrating on the position of civil liberties and human rights protection in the light of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the standards of human rights protection laid down in the European Convention on Human Rights

    It introduces and builds up critical understanding of the legal concepts which govern individual and collective rights and responsibilities, including the constraints the state may place on the citizen’s exercise of his or her human rights.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, legal drafting and academic writing in the context of the law of civil liberties and human rights, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law. It will encourage and enable students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the relationship that exists - in terms of specific individual rights and freedoms - between the State and the citizen in the UK today and how the legal, social and political conflicts and tensions which are intrinsic to that relationship influence policy, decision-making and legislation.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills and by
    the practising of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 1 (Level 5) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The Law of Equity and Trusts is a core module for the LL.B. courses, which introduces students to the key principles of the law relating to equity, trusts and the administration of estates. It is one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    It introduces and builds up a critical understanding of the legal concepts regarding the resolution of issues of property ownership.

    Trusts, including settlements, charities and pension funds, play a vital part in the economic life of the country and are increasingly recognised as indispensable modes of wealth protection or asset mobilisation throughout the world.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, legal drafting and academic writing in the context of the law of equity and trusts, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    The work placement module enables students to gain academic credit for learning through work undertaken in a legal work environment. The work may be paid employment (part-time or full-time) or an unpaid work placement with a suitable organisation. This might be a firm of solicitors, a barristers’ chambers, a legal department of a commercial enterprise, a firm licensed to offer legal services, or a not-for-profit legal advice service such as a Law Centre or Citizens Advice Bureau.

    Students are required to undertake a minimum of 105 hours in a legal workplace, equivalent to 15 full working days (based on 7 working hours per day). The minimum hours can be completed full-time or part-time during the summer after completion of level 5, or part-time over the level 6 academic year.

    The module aims to develop of students’ employability skills and competences and their abilities of self-reflection and personal development and career planning. The module builds on prior learning gained from academic studies and other relevant experience.

    The focus is on oral and written communication skills; the ability to work independently and as part of a team; the ability to manage time efficiently, to prioritise tasks, to complete tasks accurately in a timely way and to comply with time limits; problem-solving skills – finding appropriate solutions to challenging problems by the application of law or other theory; awareness of professional codes of conduct and their application in practice. The development of initiative/innovation and commercial awareness is encouraged.

    The assessment promotes development of the student’s ability to evaluate their skills and competences, to evaluate their contribution to the organisation, to reflect on the development of professional skills and competencies necessary to their graduate career goals, and to action plan in relation to graduate career and academic goals.

    Students are supported in their learning and development through group sessions and individual guidance and feedback. Students attend four group introductory sessions at which the module leader explains the requirements of the module, the skills focus, and the assessment. Individual support is available on request throughout the academic year. Detailed guidance on the module requirements and the assessment is provided via weblearn

    The responsibility for finding suitable placement lies with the student, but support is available to find and apply for suitable opportunities through the GSBL Placements and Employability Unit and University Careers service.

    The module leader will assess the suitability of the proposed placement and approve as appropriate.

    The module is open to level 6 students on law undergraduate courses and other undergraduate courses in another discipline and law.

    Read full details.
  • Civil Litigation Practice is a combination of Civil Litigation and Client Care Skills. It is a 15 week module providing students with an understanding of client care skills and civil litigation in a legal practice context. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination. The module will be of interest to all students who wish to practice civil litigation in a legal environment; or gain an exemption from ILEX Fast Track Graduate Diploma.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module introduces students to company law and includes the formation, constitution and management of companies, together with share issue, share capital, loan capital and selected aspects of insolvency law.

    Students will also examine – and look behind – the corporate veil, making a critical evaluation of the rules of corporate governance.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent
    research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of company law, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    It is a vital and dynamic topic for anyone interested in working in the corporate sector, and anyone who needs to know how businesses operate.

    Read full details.
  • The module requires the students to undertake detailed, critical research into a criminal law topic of their choice and write a research plan and essay of 8,000 words.

    Students are assigned a supervisor based on their choice of topic.

    The module is structured so that students are required to present an assessed research plan, which then provides the infrastructure for their extended essay. Students are expected to engage with regular supervision throughout the process.

    Students will develop an advanced understanding of their chosen specialist area of criminal law.
    The extended essay module will more specifically
    • allow students independently to research and develop an expert understanding of an area of law of their choice
    • improve both their research and independent study skills
    • enhance their ability to develop critical arguments
    By researching their chosen area of law, students will be equipped with specialist skills and knowledge, to help them stand out in the job market.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    Environmental law covers a wide range of concepts. It includes a consideration of the protection of natural resources through the traditional aspects of law but also through a range of principles and policy considerations.

    Increasingly, the effectiveness of environmental protection requires a consideration of the impact of business, not only as part of the problem of environmental degradation, but also as part of the solution to the future protection of exhaustible natural resources.

    Students will be able to explore a range of selected contemporary environmental issues including climate change and renewable energy. Issues of sustainable development are underpinned by aspects of environmental justice and will be considered from domestic and global perspectives.

    Overall, the module will aim to contextualise environmental law within the wider constructs of socio-economic and ethical considerations.

    This module aims to facilitate a critical approach to an understanding of environmental regulation and the policy through the exploration of contemporary issues at all levels of law and policy making (including the domestic, European and international).

    Skills:

    The module also aims to develop knowledge, research encourage good methodology in researching these topics.

    There are many career opportunities within the environmental field including work as an environmental lawyer (public or private practice), public policy advisor, working within government agencies e.g. DEFRA or the Environmental Agency or for NGO’s such as Friends of the Earth.

    Read full details.
  • The module requires the students to undertake detailed, critical research into a criminal law topic of their choice and write a research plan and essay of 5,000 words.

    Students are assigned a supervisor based on their choice of topic.

    The module is structured so that students are required to present an assessed research plan, which then provides the infrastructure for their extended essay. Students are expected to engage with regular supervision throughout the process.

    Students will develop an advanced understanding of their chosen specialist area of business law.
    The extended essay module will more specifically
    • allow students independently to research and develop an expert understanding of an area of law of their choice
    • improve both their research and independent study skills
    • enhance their ability to develop critical arguments
    By researching their chosen area of law, students will be equipped with specialist skills and knowledge, to help them stand out in the job market.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module aims to provide students with knowledge and a critical perspective of the legal principles relating to both Family Law and Child Law, especially in the context of recent and proposed reforms.

    In Family Law, the topics covered are marriage, family breakdown in the context of nullity and divorce, domestic violence and financial remedies.

    In Child Law, the topics covered are the role and involvement of local authorities, and private law issues, such as disputes about paternity, relocation, contact orders and assisted reproduction.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module provides students with an understanding of the legal concepts of immigration and nationality. This will involve a study of the rules relating to temporary admissions, settlement, deportation, illegal entry, removal and asylum.

    Students will gain a critical appreciation of the rules, policies, Conventions and cases which are integral to this field of law, and become aware of the variety of applications that may be made in the tribunals, both through independent research and by visits to the relevant tribunals.

    They will also develop an understanding of the ethical implications arising out of UK Immigration policy as evidenced in the most recent case law and legislation.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, legal drafting and academic writing in the context of the law of immigration and asylum, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law. The preparation and delivery of the assessed group oral presentation will also develop communication and team-working skills.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning
    • spring semester

    This module provides an introduction to jurisprudence or legal theory, covering basic theoretical and ethical perspectives on the law. Students will receive a sound understanding of the theories of different jurisprudential schools of thought and the contributions made to legal thinking by leading jurists from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary thinkers. The aim is to provide students with background knowledge of the science or philosophy of law. Students will learn how jurisprudence has contributed to the development of modern political, economic and legal systems. In addition, the course is placed in a modern setting and aims to raise contemporary ethical debates in order to raise awareness of the ethical background against which the law and legal practice needs to be understood.

    The study of jurisprudence permits a fuller understanding of the rational and ethical values that underpin the law and systems of justice.

    The Law Society (now Solicitors Regulatory Authority) has sought that legal training 'make awareness of and commitment to legal values, and the moral context of the law, mandatory in undergraduate law degrees ...' Law Society Preparatory Ethics Training for Future Solicitors March 2009)

    Consequently, this course aims to achieve this outcome by:

    1. providing students with an understanding of legal ideologies which have contributed to the development of legal, political and socio-economic systems in the world.
    2. To explore philosophical questions relevant to legal systems, particularly concerning the relationship between law and morality.
    3. To encourage students to recognize the ethical issues inherent in legal thinking and practice and to examine and articulate their own arguments in respect of such issues.
    4. To develop the students’ powers of reasoning and critical thinking and to increase their awareness of the relevance of theoretical issues to practical problems.
    5. To enable students to increase their capacity to work in teams cooperatively and effectively through participation in topical debates and to take initiative and responsibility in the context of such group work, so increasing competence in discussion and oral presentation.
    6. To develop further students’ ability to organise and synthesise large amounts of information in order to present key issues at an early stage in their research
    7. This module also aims to develop students’ skills, in particular:
    • Academic reading
    • Researching
    • Data analyses
    • Academic writing/literacy
    • Written communication
    • Critical thinking and writing
    • Problem solving and decision-making
    • Self/time management
    • Self assessment/reflection
    • IT skills

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    Shipping and cross-border trade are interrelated in both pragmatic and legal terms.

    This module enables students to obtain a deep understanding of the context and characteristics of international sale contracts concluded on shipment terms. Students will learn about the importance of English law in international trade. They will also be able to distinguish between the physical and documentary duties of the trade protagonists under a sale contract, understand the cardinal role of the bill of lading in shipping and commerce and the importance of the proper drafting of the sale and carriage contracts respectively.

    By the end of the module, the students will be able to identify, decipher and debate relevant legal issues arising from international commercial law disputes. They will have the expertise to scrutinise sale contracts on shipment terms and advise the buyer and seller as to their respective rights and liabilities, with reference to English law.

    It will be of particular interest to students taking the LLB (Business Law) but also to any student considering a career in commercial law in general.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module provides an introduction to theories of punishment from a criminological and sociological standpoint. It also deals with aspects of sentencing practice and procedure and allows students to participate in sentencing simulation exercises and debates. Certain categories of offender (e.g. young offenders, women) are considered in depth. Finally, the issue of penal reform, including restorative justice, is addressed in the light of the most recent initiatives in the field.

    The course includes:

    • an introduction to theories of punishment and their historical roots with an emphasis upon critical discussion of the conceptual positions that underscore the system.

    • an introduction to the range of sentencing options available to the courts and an awareness of the considerations that confront sentencers in making sentencing decisions.

    • techniques for the presentation of arguments relating to sentencing

    • a discussion of the institutional experiences of different categories of offenders in a range of penal institutions

    • a general discussion of the possibilities for reform of the penal system

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    International law is increasingly important to states, organisations and individuals, and impacts on every aspect of modern life.

    This 30 credit module will provide students with a thorough knowledge of the key concepts of international law, such as the sources of international law, the definition of statehood, the principle of self-determination, states’ acquisition of title to territory and jurisdiction over territory and people, state responsibility for unlawful acts, and states’ use of force.

    Knowledge of the key principles and substantive topics will be matched with understanding of the operation of international law in the real world. Students will be encouraged to approach the subject critically and to develop their analytic skills to the highest level.

    The module will introduce students to the current debates and challenges in this subject, with a focus on topical examples which will bring the subject to life and motivate students to explore the subject more fully.

    Teaching will be by a combination of lecture, seminar (academic discussion) and workshop (developing academic and transferable skills such as critical thinking and oral and written communication skills).

    The module will be of interest to all students who take an interest in current affairs, international relations, the international order, international peace and security.

    The module is relevant to a wide range of careers in law, government, politics, international relations, the media, and international business.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

You could go on to train as a solicitor or barrister, after graduating with this LLB course. As well as qualifying you for this next stage of training, this course prepares you for other graduate careers, including roles in business, media, voluntary organisations and non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

Career management is encouraged through reference to the relevant professional bodies, work experience and careers advice. Guidance and feedback from an individual personal development profile is provided to prepare you for a professional career. Our online vacancy system, Prospects Net illustrates opportunities for part-time, full-time, vacation and voluntary work.

We're investing in an exciting, multimillion pound transformation of the London Metropolitan University campus, between 2016 and 2020. We're moving all of our activity to one place, our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching locations of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Apply to us for September 2018

It's not too late to start this course in September.

Applying for a full-time undergraduate degree starting this September is quick and easy - simply call our Clearing hotline on .

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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