Tourism and Travel Management (Top-up) - BA (Hons)

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Why study this course?

This is a top-up version of our Tourism and Travel Management BA degree. A top-up degree is the final year (Level 6) of an undergraduate degree course and is for those who have a foundation degree, Higher National Diploma or equivalent qualification, or those wishing to study the final degree of their degree in London.

This degree will bring you closer to a managerial career in the travel and tourism sector. You’ll investigate contemporary issues, including how to evaluate and mitigate risks, develop tourism marketing strategies and manage visitor attractions. You’ll benefit from close links with government and businesses via membership of the Tourism Management Institute, as well as insights from international projects by research centres such as the Association for Tourism and Leisure Education and Research (ATLAS).

More about this course

The Tourism and Travel Travel Management (Top-up) degree offers an opportunity to enter a sector that provides unique opportunities to less developed countries. It is one of few global economic activities that helps promote and protect cultural heritage of local communities, enhances labour mobility, creates jobs and improves access to international markets.

This programme has been developed to answer the tourism and travel industry's demand for specialised managers and planners. It's constantly evolving to cover the most up-to-date issues and to prepare entrepreneurs for the challenging tourism business environment. You'll acquire knowledge in sustainable tourism management, cultural heritage and tourism-led regeneration. You'll also have the opportunity to explore niche tourism products, realise their potential and see how tourism relates to issues of global peace, justice, human rights and social inclusion.

The University is located in London, at the centre of the country’s booming tourism and travel industry. The teaching utilises our location with a series of case studies including World Travel Market's international trade fair. Our diverse community is also reflected in our teaching and we use a range of worldwide case studies based on students' own experiences and culture.

We have previously organised and hosted the annual Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport student conference, with speakers including Hugh Sumner, former Director of Transport at the Olympic Delivery Agency.

Assessment

Assessments include simulation of professional practice and consultancy, independent and group research for a field trip and survey-based projects, portfolios, posters and videos, along with more traditional essays, reports, case studies, presentations, tests and a final dissertation.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code N833
Entry requirements View

This course is subject to validation.

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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have one of the following:

  • 240 credits from a Higher National Diploma (HND), Foundation Degree (FdA/ FdSc) or equivalent international qualification in a relevant subject
  • 240 credits from years 1 and 2 of an undergraduate degree (BA/BSc) in a relevant subject at a different institution

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 3 modules include:

  • ‘Destination Management and Marketing’ guides students through principles of tourism destinations management and marketing, opening prospective career pathway into planning and developing tourism destination’s portfolio. Realistic understanding of obstacles facing destinations that seek to establish or improve destination product and image will be explored critically with reference to current issues and case studies from range of destination types: urban and rural, led by events, culture, business or niche tourism products.

    As core module for Tourism and Events pathway, it aims to utilise links with Tourism Management Institute and develop graduates able to meet industry needs and pursue career in this, mostly public, sector of tourism industry.

    Design is based on the model of work-simulation, as the module aims to offer students an opportunity to practice industry-specific skills and competencies; apply so far attained knowledge and develop teamworking and communication skills. During the course of the module, students apply principles to practice through ‘live’ examples, advising a particular British destination on improving its competitive advantage via typical for destination manager's practice tools: poster, business pitch and project bid.

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  • ‘Research methods for dissertations and consultancy projects’ teaches social science research methods from a real-world perspective. Students can follow the dissertation or consultancy project pathway so to apply their understanding of research methods to a substantial piece of independent research.

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  • This module critically analyses the theories and models that guide the development of business strategy for the travel sector with reference to current issues and case studies. Students will apply principles to practice through ‘live’ examples, for example strategies of start-up airlines entering scheduled routes.

    The aim of the module is to apply theories and models of sustainable competitive advantage to the travel sector with particular reference to liberalization of travel markets, and continuing barriers to market entry. It also aims to examine the significance of organizational structure and people management for business strategy in the travel sector.

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  • The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 1 (Level 5) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module enables students to undertake a short period of professional activity either part-time/vacation employment; work placement; not-for-profit sector volunteering or a professional project led by an employer.

    The work related learning activity must be for a minimum of 105 hours. These hours can be completed in a minimum of 15 working days (based on 7 hours per day) full-time during the summer, or over a semester in a part-time mode. The activity aims to: enable learners to build on previous experience and learning gained within academic studies and elsewhere; provide opportunity for personal skills and employability development and requires application of subject knowledge and relevant literature. Learners will be supported in developing improved understanding of themselves, and the work environment through reflective and reflexive learning in reference to the Quality Assurance Agency Subject Benchmark Statements for the appropriate degree programme.

    Students will be contacted prior to the semester to ensure they understand requirements of securing work related activity in advance. Support is provided to find and apply for suitable opportunities through the Placements and Careers teams. The suitability of the opportunities will be assessed by the Module Team. Learners may be able to utilise existing employment, providing they can demonstrate that it is personally developmental and involves a certain level of responsibility. It is a student's responsibility to apply for opportunities and engage with the Placement and Careers team to assist them in finding a suitable role.

    The module is open to all Business and Management undergraduate course programmes (for semesters/levels, see the appropriate course specification.

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  • This module is designed to provide students with an opportunity to prepare for entering the workplace as a graduate, as well as preparing them for success in their future career. It will help students to develop a clearer understanding of themselves, identify and develop their strengths and abilities as well as support their CV, application writing and interview skills.
    The aim of the module is to
    • prepare students for the graduate employment market;
    • prepare students for their future career by helping them to identify their preferences and career anchors;
    • raise students’ awareness of themselves and their personality type;
    • provide students with a narrative to describe themselves at interview;
    • practice required skills needed to be successful including networking, assessment centre exercises, interviewing skills;
    • help students to develop their CV, and application writing as well as interview skills.

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  • This module looks at the relationship between the creative industries, events and cultural policies. It critically discusses notions of the creative class, the creative city and the experience economy which have been used to inform and support strategies in cultural and creative industries policies. It further investigates the role the creative industries play in urban as well as rural areas and it also explores ways in which cities have reinvented themselves as centres of leisure and culture consumption using major cultural infrastructure investment, events and festivals.

    Aims:
    1. To critically assess and analyse the relationship between events, cultural policy and the creative industries
    2. To provide students with an understanding of the role strategy and policy-making play in event-led and culture-led regeneration projects
    3. To further develop students’ analytical and critical abilities and prepare them for the completion of an individual essay based on independent research

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    The creative industries have grown substantially in the UK in recent years. They are known for their uniqueness – high-pressure environments, fragmentation and diversity. The module identifies a number of players within the industry including film, fashion, photography, print, music and advertising and examines the particular working experience of ‘the creative’. Firms within the industry are heavily project-based – meaning they operate very short project cycles, against numerous rivals, with relatively easy entry and exit strategies. The module highlights issues within the industry including a shortage of managers, fierce competition and working in a fast moving industry. The main aims of the module are to:

    1. Broaden the students’ understanding of what constitutes creative industries and the contribution creative industries make within UK and in the world.
    2. Provide students with sound understanding of the management of creative people/firms.
    3. Provide students with an over view of project management from project planning, managing a project and evaluation of the project performance.

    The module will enable students to enhance their analytical, problem solving, critical, planning and reflective thinking abilities. This would assist the students with their employability skills within the creative industries and beyond.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon
    • spring semester - Friday morning
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module is a 15 credit option module on the Undergraduate Scheme.

    Increasingly managers at all levels of an organisation are required to manage projects, temporary endeavours undertaken to create a unique product or service. This module uses the Association of Project Management Body of Knowledge (APMBOK), https://www.apm.org.uk/body-of-knowledge/ - and therefore prepares students in the capabilities required for effective project management: managing resources, time, people, and the project as a whole. The module includes both the use of computer programmes for project management and approaches to managing people and leading and motivating teams.

    Aims of the module:
    The module will equip the student with an understanding of the complexities of managing projects in an uncertain world. The student will become familiar with the project business case, the detailed planning and the use of ‘WBS’ and the ’OBS’, resources issues and their management, the timeline, budgeting and cash flow as well as the eventual monitoring and control of the project through methods of tracking and monitoring. The student will study methods of managing people in the project with appropriate models of leadership, team behaviours and motivation and methods of conflict management and resolution.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    The aviation and travel industry have a huge number of interdependent factions within it and this leads to vast operational complexities. This together with a highly regulated industry, a competitive and dynamic external environment and a substantial level of Government involvement has the potential expose this sector and, airlines and airports alike, to a vast array of risks and uncertainties, both internally and externally.

    This module aims to explore the types of risk that the aviation and travel sector generally sector are exposed to and, what possible solutions might be put forward to mitigate against these.

    More specifically the module will help develop the students understanding of how to assess, evaluate, mitigate and monitor risks as they pertain to the sector. This can be further broken down into developing an understanding of the areas such as;
    • financial risk
    • operational risk
    • HR and outsourcing risks
    • Strategic and commercial risks

    The module aims to develop a students understanding of theoretical modules for risk and business continuity and identify good practice and lessons learnt from both the sector itself and, related industries.

    The aim of this module is to build a practical knowledge base of the operational requirements for airlines and airports and the travel industry, to operate as effectively and efficiently as possible in sub optimal business environments or, due to unforeseen or unstoppable events.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    ‘Visitor Attraction Management’ considers visitor attractions from the perspective of the tourism industry – as a product that is managed and marketed to tourists to meet visitor expectations and maximise visitor satisfaction while ensuring financial security in a dynamic external environment.
    The module covers visitor attractions in the commercial, pubic and not for profit sectors. In order to understand the operation of these attractions, consideration to the main management functions including finance, marketing, visitor experience management, facilities management, interpretation and education is given. Specific issues related to the management of sensitive sites (such as sacred sites and dark heritage sites) are considered. Ethical issues in the management of visitor attractions are dealt with in areas such as the handling of live collections (zoos and aquaria), the treatment of human remains, the provenance of collections, restitution and repatriation.
    Whatever the attraction (theme park, museum, temple or battlefield) - they all need to maintain the appropriate balance of visitor engagement, enjoyment, excitement and enlightenment. In addition, they need to continually adapt to the dynamic social, economic and political environment in which they operate. To that end, the module emphasises the need for organisations to think ahead strategically and develop plans to build on their strengths and exploit the opportunities in the wider environment in order to retain and improve their market position.
    The module aims to give students the analytical skills to evaluate a visitor attraction and apply management principles to devise strategic options for organisations that will address internal and external challenges.

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After the course

We believe that your university experience should be designed to enhance and support your professional life. We place as much emphasis on gaining skills relevant to the workplace as on learning the academic discipline you're studying. We're comitted to helping you enhance your job prospects and preparing you for a rewarding and successful career. 

This course is designed to offer an intellectually stimulating and distinctive learning experience that will help you build a rewarding career. Many of our graduates have gained employment in business, government and third sector tourism organisations, as managers in road, rail, sea and air transport, tour operators, destination managers and planners, and in research and consultancy.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Additional information

Our business and law undergraduate programmes are continuously improving and are currently under review for 2020-21 entry. Please apply as outlined in the how to apply section of this page and If there are any changes to your course we will contact you. All universities review their courses regularly and this year we are strengthening our business and law courses to reflect the ever-changing landscape of the world of business and law.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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