Tourism and Travel Management - BA (Hons)

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Why study this course?

This degree will bring you closer to a professional managerial career in the largest global service sector. You’ll benefit from close links with government and businesses via membership in Tourism Management Institute, as well as insights from international projects by research centres such as ATLAS. Studying with us you will investigate live issues such as how to develop local tourism marketing strategies, improve the quality of London’s key visitor attractions and help local people to benefit from tourism development.

In the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of all 2017 graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

Within the international economy, tourism and travel is seen as a major employer and sector providing unique development opportunities to less developed countries. It's also one of the few economic activities responsible for intensified contributions towards nature and cultural heritage protection and conservation. All over the world, especially in Europe, tourism and travel are positioned as leaders in local communities’ activation programmes and used as an indicator of the quality of life.

This programme has been developed to answer the tourism and travel industry's demand for specialised managers and planners. It's constantly evolving to include the most up-to-date issues and to prepare entrepreneurs for the challenging tourism business environment. You'll acquire knowledge in sustainable tourism management, cultural heritage and tourism-led regeneration and be faced with challenges of marketing British tourism destinations. You'll be given the opportunity to explore niche tourism products, realise their potential and see how tourism relates to issues of global peace, justice, human rights and social inclusion.

The teaching on this course utilises our London location with a series of case studies including the the international trade fair of World Travel Market. We also have one of the most diverse international bodies of students, which allows us to teach a range of worldwide case studies based on students' own experiences and culture.

Our overseas study tour is the highlight of the course providing an early example of field research techniques and addressing tourism marketing, management, planning and sustainability issues. We also offer European Student Exchange Programme (Erasmus) and a range of work placement opportunities (including a one-year sandwich placement), allowing you to gain practical experience whilst studying.

We have previously organised and hosted the annual Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport student conference, with speakers including Hugh Sumner, former director of transport at the Olympic Delivery Agency.

The course has a Facebook page with news and events from alumni, students and staff.

The aims of the programme are to:

  • offer an intellectually stimulating, career-relevant and coherent programme, enabling students to develop a thorough understanding of theories, approaches and techniques relevant to professional practice in tourism, travel and destination management
  • develop a holistic appreciation of the multimodal distribution chain and developments in digital media, including the role of marketing and communications, entrepreneurship, operational and strategic management in tourism and travel industries
  • provide comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the socio-cultural, economic, technological, and political environment in which the tourism destinations and industry operates, relevant systems of governance and public policy at different scales: global, national, and local
  • develop a sound appreciation of effective people management in organisations, career opportunities for graduates as well as the student’s potential contribution as a manager and professional in tourism destinations and industry sector
  • enhance the ability of students to operate as effective learners, independently as well as in teams, and to foster a creative approach to evidence-based problem solving
  • develop and improve students as researchers, able to carry out primary research relating to contemporary issues in tourism and travel, including data collection, data analysis, presentation of findings and recommendations

Assessment

Assessments include simulation of professional practice and consultancy, independent and group research for a field trip and survey-based projects, portfolios, poster, video, along with more traditional essays, reports, case studies, presentations, tests and a final dissertation.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code N832
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum grade C in three A levels in academic subjects (or a minimum of 96 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSEs at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    ‘Exploring Tourism – Narratives of Travel’ is constructed around the range of perspectives through which tourism has developed, is understood and can be studied, as first analysed by Jafari’s (1992) model of tourism studies. Tourism is an area of academic study that incorporates a wide range of other disciplines - yet has developed its own identity. Awareness and appreciation of narratives existing in tourism, allows students to better understand various concepts and interrelations within the industry.

    The module provides an introduction to spatial aspects of tourism via regionalisation and tourism geography. Further on, the module explores management, legal and ethical frameworks in which tourism businesses operate and moves onto political economy, planning and development studies impact on contemporary tourism. In the final stages, module incorporates ideas drawn from anthropology, sociology and cultural studies to broaden understanding of multi- and interdisciplinary of tourism.

    This broad-based module feeds into subsequent tourism and travel related modules, introducing concepts that will recur and will be expanded upon further in level 5 (second year) and 6 (third year). With an emphasis on a co-creation of knowledge, the module engages students in an exploration of themes and topics that are appropriate to their field of study, and to themselves as learners.

    The overarching aim of the module is to provide a comprehensive foundation for studying tourism and allow students to develop an awareness and appreciation of multidisciplinary of their area of study.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    ‘London’s Visitor Economy’ aims to showcase students the extent of visitor economy in London and encourage them to examine its potential with regards to their studies, professional development and employability. The module will explore different dimensions of global city’s visitor economy, both in class and in the field. Tourist experience is shaped by a variety of supply elements such as accessibility, quality and availability of services, range and value of attractions, experiences and events. International and socio-culturally diverse cohort of students allows the opportunity to employ and interrogate personal perspectives and engage in discussion on the meaning of satisfactory tourist experience.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The service sector has been growing significantly for more than fifty years to the extent that in the developed world, most people earn their living from producing services than making manufactured goods. In fact, well over three-quarters of the active population in the developed world work in service-related industries, including aviation and creative industries. Services therefore have a major impact on national economies.

    The subject of Services Marketing has grown in response to this. Latterly, however, manufacturing and technology industries have also recognised the need to provide services not only as a means of adding value to the physical products they market, but also as the basis for a different orientation to the management of their businesses.

    This module will address the key issues, concepts and models, which form the core of services marketing management theory and practice, focusing on aviation and creative industries.

    The module aims to provide an understanding of the marketing management process in the context of aviation and creative industries. The module also aims to assist students in the acquisition of the following skills:
    • Academic writing & reading
    • Application of knowledge and presenting and interpreting data
    • Communicating/Presenting, orally and in writing
    • Inter-personal/Inter-cultural communication

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    To be successful in business one needs to be able to deal with numbers and understand statistics, and the various ways in which they are presented. Innovation and entrepreneurship come from creativity, and from understanding trends that are visible in data available through business and industry statistics.
    This module introduces data collection and presentation skills in the context of the travel and tourism industry. It provides underpinning skills required to deal with numerical information and to make effective use of mathematical and statistical methods of data analysis and interpretation relevant to the industry. In other words, it provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of statistical methods necessary for the travel and tourism industry.
    Overall, this module provides analytical and communications skills relevant to understanding industry information with an emphasis on problem-solving techniques used in aviation and tourism industries.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    ‘Tourism Industries: People, Processes and Change’ introduces the complex and interconnected system of tourism and travel industries, enabling students to make more informed decisions regarding future career prospects and employment opportunities. In the second semester, module changes focus from supply to demand – tourists. Finally, the module looks at tourism as a force that changes the world – discussing very important (and often significant), positive and negative implications tourists themselves and tourism and travel industry have on destinations, economy, societies, culture and environment.

    The over-arching aim of the module is to introduce students to the key stakeholders and key sectors of tourism and travel industries and to understand impacts generated by activities and developments in the sector.

    In line with guidance from Subject Benchmark Statements (2016), the module provides students with comprehensive coverage of the structure, operations and interactions within the tourism industry, career development and learning opportunities in the tourism sector, as well as the nature and characteristics of tourists and tourism in the cultures, communities and environments that it affects.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    ‘Culture, Tourism and Regeneration’ explores the growth and increasing diversity of cultural tourism, the role it plays in urban centres and their regions, and the ways in which cities have reinvented themselves as centres of leisure and recreation consumption using major cultural infrastructure investment, heritage commodification, events and festivals.

    The module considers how cultural tourism utilises notions of identity, authenticity, memory, tradition, heritage and intangible heritage for the entertainment of tourists. At the same time destinations are looking for new ways of presenting their existing cultural assets while developing new experiential and creative products to an increasingly sophisticated audience. The module explores the way in which culture and tourism have become a central part of regeneration strategies as cities try to adapt to the far-reaching social and economic changes that have transformed them over the last 60 years. London is a prime example of these processes, but the module will also consider examples from other parts of the UK and beyond.

    The module is designed to enhance students’ understanding of cultural tourism by developing their analytical and creative skills by employing photography, product design and case study analysis. The assessment programme consists of three components: a photo essay analysing an aspect of cultural tourism (30%); a design and prototype for a visitor trail (30%) and finally an analytical case study of an urban regeneration project (40%).

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    ‘Service Excellence for Tourism’ investigates practices and strategies used in managing exceptional relationships between customers and service providers. Consistent delivery of high quality service in tourism and travel industries increases customer loyalty, businesses reputation and competitive advantage, hence the module focus lies in the exploration of three aspects of excellent service delivery: visitor management techniques, quality management and digitalisation of service.
    The aim of the module is to provide students with understanding of the importance of service excellence, including reflection on their own professional conduct practices, and equip them with analytical ability to assess and improve service delivery.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    ‘Skills, Methods and Analysis’ aims to equip students with knowledge and elementary skills of data collection, presentation and analysis utilised in management research. The module will be divided into three short parts focusing on skills (writing, referencing and research ethics), methods (sampling, qualitative and quantitative research methods) and analysis (coding and data presentation).

    Through the series of practical exercises students will become familiar with the concept and variety of research methods available in the business and social research area. The module serves as an underpinning for the dissertation or consultancy projects in level 6. Additionally, on successful completion of the module, students who would like to try using research methods in practical setting, can choose an optional and self-funded ‘Applied Research with Field Course’ module in the Spring semester.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    ‘Sustainability, Business and Responsibility’ module addresses the critical issue of how current thinking on sustainability will impact on businesses and organisation. The need to create more sustainable organisations and businesses is fundamental to current and future organisational development strategies, and it is necessary for students to understand the growing influence of the sustainability agenda on industry. This influence takes on many forms, from government policies and international agreements to the measuring the impacts of organisational practices on the ecology and communities.
    It is unavoidable that in the future, organisations, businesses, communities and individuals will be expected to understand and take responsibility for their economic, environmental and social impacts. This module henceforth will examine the current and future challenges and it will equip students with knowledge to deal with the challenge of creating sustainable forms of business that operate within ecological and socio-economic limits. It will explore the sustainability context, and how business practices will need to evolve to reflect the realities of operating within a globalised trading system that is striving to apply sustainability principles.
    The overarching aim of the module is to ensure that students develop a full understanding of what is meant by sustainability, who decides, what constitutes sustainability principles and how these principles are applied. It will explore varied tools and techniques used to apply sustainability principles, by governments, business and communities, and the challenges and conflicts these present. Such appreciation will be developed progressively via more specific aims which are:
    • To engage with the growing international debate and practice around sustainability, business and corporate social responsibility (CSR);
    • To evaluate how this will challenge organisations and businesses;
    • To examine tools and techniques for evaluating and implementing of sustainability;
    • To analyse the evolving policy frameworks within which business operates;
    • To understand how changing environmental realities may affect business practice.
    The module also aims to assist students in the acquisition of the academic skills such as academic reading, researching, problem-solving and decision making, critical thinking and writing and finally application of knowledge and presenting data.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    ‘The Applied Research with Field Course’ is designed around the model of research-informed teaching, with emphasis on learning through problem-solving and self-managed projects. The module serves as an optional continuum to ‘Skills, Analysis and Methods’ module and aims to stimulate development of students’ ability to relate theoretical material to real world case study, making clear links between theory, research methodology, data collection and analysis.
    For the length of the module, students cooperate and work in groups, to gather amount of data sufficient to complete their independent projects. Given the case study destination, students research relevant to their discipline aspects of the destination and decide on subject-specific problem to be investigated using primary research. In the next stage, students design research framework focusing on research question, suitable methodology and sampling. In the process, the encouragement is given to the use of mixed methodologies (interviews, surveys, audits, participant observation and visual methodologies) to enable students to practice in field a range of tools and develop skills of independent researcher. During the field course, students are expected to conform to the professional code of conduct.
    Additionally, the module aims to create group cohesion and the sense of course belonging, which is fundamental to improving retention rates as well as overall levels of student satisfaction.
    The aim of the module is to provide students with an opportunity to design research project and practice research skills in an unfamiliar environment, via residential field course. This serves as a practical underpinning for the dissertation module and ability to verify and address student’s individual strengths and weaknesses as a researcher.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    ‘Niche Tourism’ studies wide range of forms of tourism increasingly vital in the tourism industry due to the growing importance of experience economy. Contents cover an overview of niche tourism concept and distinctiveness of niche marketing approach, to be able to explore various areas of niche tourism, covering the scope of culture- and nature-related forms, together with niche tourism forms of ethical concern such as sex tourism.

    Teaching uses many case studies throughout, aiming to provide students with a realistic understanding of challenges faced by small and medium enterprises and destinations seeking to establish or improve their destination product through niche tourism. Study of niche marketing techniques prepares students to recognise and apply strategies appropriate for particular circumstances and successfully compete for visitors in today's global marketplace. Knowledge of growing in popularity forms of niche tourism enables students to practice application of ‘fresh’ strategic approaches to destination’s planning and entrepreneurship.

    Module is delivered as part of the BA Tourism and Travel Management curriculum; however it is also suitable for students with some marketing background, interested in innovative tourism products and niche marketing principles. It also serves as basis for research ideas useful in the dissertation module, and as an opportunity for entrepreneurial activity of alumni.

    The aim of the module is to enhance students’ understanding of the scope and role of niche tourism forms in destinations’ development and as an entrepreneurship option, at the same time equipping students with essential transferable skills of social media creation, cross-cultural awareness and creativity and innovative thinking.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    ‘Destination Management and Marketing’ guides students through principles of tourism destinations management and marketing, opening prospective career pathway into planning and developing tourism destination’s portfolio. Realistic understanding of obstacles facing destinations that seek to establish or improve destination product and image will be explored critically with reference to current issues and case studies from range of destination types: urban and rural, led by events, culture, business or niche tourism products.

    As core module for Tourism and Events pathway, it aims to utilise links with Tourism Management Institute and develop graduates able to meet industry needs and pursue career in this, mostly public, sector of tourism industry.

    Design is based on the model of work-simulation, as the module aims to offer students an opportunity to practice industry-specific skills and competencies; apply so far attained knowledge and develop teamworking and communication skills. During the course of the module, students apply principles to practice through ‘live’ examples, advising a particular British destination on improving its competitive advantage via typical for destination manager's practice tools: poster, business pitch and project bid.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    ‘Research methods for dissertations and consultancy projects’ teaches social science research methods from a real-world perspective. Students can follow the dissertation or consultancy project pathway so to apply their understanding of research methods to a substantial piece of independent research.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    This module critically analyses the theories and models that guide the development of business strategy for the travel sector with reference to current issues and case studies. Students will apply principles to practice through ‘live’ examples, for example strategies of start-up airlines entering scheduled routes.

    The aim of the module is to apply theories and models of sustainable competitive advantage to the travel sector with particular reference to liberalization of travel markets, and continuing barriers to market entry. It also aims to examine the significance of organizational structure and people management for business strategy in the travel sector.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 1 (Level 5) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module enables students to undertake a short period of professional activity either part-time/vacation employment; work placement; not-for-profit sector volunteering or a professional project led by an employer.

    The work related learning activity must be for a minimum of 105 hours. These hours can be completed in a minimum of 15 working days (based on 7 hours per day) full-time during the summer, or over a semester in a part-time mode. The activity aims to: enable learners to build on previous experience and learning gained within academic studies and elsewhere; provide opportunity for personal skills and employability development and requires application of subject knowledge and relevant literature. Learners will be supported in developing improved understanding of themselves, and the work environment through reflective and reflexive learning in reference to the Quality Assurance Agency Subject Benchmark Statements for the appropriate degree programme.

    Students will be contacted prior to the semester to ensure they understand requirements of securing work related activity in advance. Support is provided to find and apply for suitable opportunities through the Placements and Careers teams. The suitability of the opportunities will be assessed by the Module Team. Learners may be able to utilise existing employment, providing they can demonstrate that it is personally developmental and involves a certain level of responsibility. It is a student's responsibility to apply for opportunities and engage with the Placement and Careers team to assist them in finding a suitable role.

    The module is open to all Business and Management undergraduate course programmes (for semesters/levels, see the appropriate course specification.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module looks at the relationship between the creative industries, events and cultural policies. It critically discusses notions of the creative class, the creative city and the experience economy which have been used to inform and support strategies in cultural and creative industries policies. It further investigates the role the creative industries play in urban as well as rural areas and it also explores ways in which cities have reinvented themselves as centres of leisure and culture consumption using major cultural infrastructure investment, events and festivals.

    Aims:
    1. To critically assess and analyse the relationship between events, cultural policy and the creative industries
    2. To provide students with an understanding of the role strategy and policy-making play in event-led and culture-led regeneration projects
    3. To further develop students’ analytical and critical abilities and prepare them for the completion of an individual essay based on independent research

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Friday morning
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    This module is a 15 credit option module on the Undergraduate Scheme.

    Increasingly managers at all levels of an organisation are required to manage projects, temporary endeavours undertaken to create a unique product or service. This module uses the Association of Project Management Body of Knowledge (APMBOK), https://www.apm.org.uk/body-of-knowledge/ - and therefore prepares students in the capabilities required for effective project management: managing resources, time, people, and the project as a whole. The module includes both the use of computer programmes for project management and approaches to managing people and leading and motivating teams.

    Aims of the module:
    The module will equip the student with an understanding of the complexities of managing projects in an uncertain world. The student will become familiar with the project business case, the detailed planning and the use of ‘WBS’ and the ’OBS’, resources issues and their management, the timeline, budgeting and cash flow as well as the eventual monitoring and control of the project through methods of tracking and monitoring. The student will study methods of managing people in the project with appropriate models of leadership, team behaviours and motivation and methods of conflict management and resolution.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    The aviation and travel industry have a huge number of interdependent factions within it and this leads to vast operational complexities. This together with a highly regulated industry, a competitive and dynamic external environment and a substantial level of Government involvement has the potential expose this sector and, airlines and airports alike, to a vast array of risks and uncertainties, both internally and externally.

    This module aims to explore the types of risk that the aviation and travel sector generally sector are exposed to and, what possible solutions might be put forward to mitigate against these.

    More specifically the module will help develop the students understanding of how to assess, evaluate, mitigate and monitor risks as they pertain to the sector. This can be further broken down into developing an understanding of the areas such as;
    • financial risk
    • operational risk
    • HR and outsourcing risks
    • Strategic and commercial risks

    The module aims to develop a students understanding of theoretical modules for risk and business continuity and identify good practice and lessons learnt from both the sector itself and, related industries.

    The aim of this module is to build a practical knowledge base of the operational requirements for airlines and airports and the travel industry, to operate as effectively and efficiently as possible in sub optimal business environments or, due to unforeseen or unstoppable events.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon

    ‘Visitor Attraction Management’ considers visitor attractions from the perspective of the tourism industry – as a product that is managed and marketed to tourists to meet visitor expectations and maximise visitor satisfaction while ensuring financial security in a dynamic external environment.
    The module covers visitor attractions in the commercial, pubic and not for profit sectors. In order to understand the operation of these attractions, consideration to the main management functions including finance, marketing, visitor experience management, facilities management, interpretation and education is given. Specific issues related to the management of sensitive sites (such as sacred sites and dark heritage sites) are considered. Ethical issues in the management of visitor attractions are dealt with in areas such as the handling of live collections (zoos and aquaria), the treatment of human remains, the provenance of collections, restitution and repatriation.
    Whatever the attraction (theme park, museum, temple or battlefield) - they all need to maintain the appropriate balance of visitor engagement, enjoyment, excitement and enlightenment. In addition, they need to continually adapt to the dynamic social, economic and political environment in which they operate. To that end, the module emphasises the need for organisations to think ahead strategically and develop plans to build on their strengths and exploit the opportunities in the wider environment in order to retain and improve their market position.
    The module aims to give students the analytical skills to evaluate a visitor attraction and apply management principles to devise strategic options for organisations that will address internal and external challenges.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

After the course

We believe that your university experience should be designed to enhance and support your professional life. We place as much emphasis on gaining skills relevant to the workplace as on learning the academic discipline that you are studying. We embed employability in every year of your journey with us, starting from year one modules, through short- and long placement modules to the professional environment stimulation modules such as Destination Management and Marketing.

This course is designed to offer an intellectually stimulating and distinctive programme that enables you to prepare for a satisfying career. Over the past twenty years, many of our graduates have developed rewarding careers in business, government and third sector tourism organisations, as managers in road, rail, sea and air transport, tour operators, destination managers and planners, and in research and consultancy.

Moving to one campus

If you're starting your course from September 2019, you will be taught at our campus in Holloway, Islington.

At our Islington campus you'll benefit from state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and a wide range of social spaces.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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