International Relations and Law - BA (Hons)

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Why study this course?

Explore how law and international relations interrelate and how to use your legal knowledge in an international, diplomatic and political context. This degree specialises in two disciplines, increasing your career prospects with transferable skills and opportunities for work placements and study in European and American universities. With its expert staff and extensive resources, this course appeals to students from across the world.

In the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of all 2017 graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

On this degree you’ll examine ideological and ethical questions about international relations as well as legal debates and policies, and have the opportunity to look at terrorism, the environment, poverty, nuclear proliferation, religion, human rights, cyber warfare, intelligence and the complex relationships between states.

You’ll develop the capacity to think critically about events, ideas and institutions in a research culture that promotes academic inquiry and debate, and in your second and third year, you’ll be able to pursue your own areas of interest including power politics, foreign policy analysis, regional studies, security studies and the impact of globalisation.

Taught by expert staff with extensive experience, this degree appeals to students both in the UK and overseas. You’ll enjoy regular lectures and presentations from practitioners such as Supreme Court judges, diplomats and politicians, and access to the opportunities that London offers such as visits to embassies, courts and the Houses of Parliament.

There’s a strong emphasis on developing the essential skills sought by employers. This is achieved through targeted teaching sessions and hands-on experience, and the exciting opportunity to undertake a work placement in the final year. In previous years, students have undertaken placements with the European Union, the United Nations, aid agencies, think-tanks and embassies. It’s also possible to spend part of the course studying in another European country or the USA.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed through essays, exams, presentations, individual and group research projects, briefing papers, portfolios, reflective writing and a final year dissertation or work placement.

Professional accreditation

This is not a qualifying law degree for professional legal training. Please see our LLB Law or LLB (with International Relations) courses which are qualifying law degrees.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code ML1F
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum grade BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification eg, Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSEs at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the International Relations and Politics Extended degree.

Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate access or other preparatory courses or who have appropriate work experience.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The Law of Contract is a core module for the LL.B. courses and the BA in Law, which introduces students to the key principles of the Law of Contract, which is one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    As well as studying the traditional principles of offer, acceptance, consideration and third party rights, students will also consider other such practical topics as terms, misrepresentation, frustration, exemption clauses and remedies for breach of contract.

    Students will develop their skills in reading and understanding primary and secondary sources of law; and practise the practical and professional skills of legal research, legal analysis and legal writing.

    The module is relevant and very important for a range of careers in law, commerce and industry.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The broad aim is to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of the study of international relations. In particular to:

    1. Analyse historical precedents and the institutions underlying contemporary international relations.
    2. Understand the contemporary challenges facing the world and the institutional and political factors which hinder, or help provide, solutions to these problems.
    3. Make informed judgements about current international affairs – and future developments – within the larger theoretical frameworks and approaches to international relations.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday morning

    Legal System is a core module for the LL.B. courses and the BA in Law, which introduces students to the workings of the English Legal System in its historical, contemporary and international context.

    It includes the study of the sources of law, the law making process, the institutional and court structure, the legal profession and the roles of legal actors within the English Legal system.

    It also enables students to start to acquire the fundamental academic and professional skills necessary for the undergraduate study of law. In this way, it provides a solid support both for the other first year modules, and also for the remainder of the degree course and beyond into professional practice.

    Students learn how to locate legal material; to read and understand primary and secondary sources of law (paper based and electronic); and to recognise and develop at an introductory level the practical and professional legal skills of advocacy, legal research and legal writing. These skills are be applied in the context of primary legal materials used in their other modules.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday afternoon

    This module aims to:
    1. Provide a detailed account of the development of the Cold War and post-Cold War international systems at global, regional and sub-national levels;
    2. Introduce students to key concepts related to diplomacy, peace and conflict;
    3. Examine the role of diplomatic institutions and peace processes in attempts to contain or resolve violent conflicts;
    4. Encourage the development of the skills of comparative analysis, by comparing conflicts in different regions;
    5. Develop and encourage confidence in the use of appropriate analytical, written and oral skills.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    One of the central questions for the discipline of International Relations is to explain the behaviour of states in the international system. This module explores two of the most important and significant approaches to addressing this question: IR theory and foreign policy analysis respectively.

    The first half of the module explores the various theoretical perspectives which can be used to understand the dynamics of the international system and how they condition state behaviour. It explores both explanatory and critical approaches to this issue, the former seeking to explain how the international system operates, with the latter seeking to transform the nature of world politics in one way or another.

    The second half of the module approaches the question from the perspective of foreign policy analysis, focusing on the decisions, structures and processes within states that produce international action. It examines both models of foreign policy decision making and comparative national approaches to foreign policy.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This core LLB unit provides a detailed understanding of the underlying concepts of European Union Law and its topical relationship to UK domestic law.

    It considers the law-making powers of the EU institutions, the constitutional principles of the EU, the direct effect of EU law, indirect effect and the principle of State Liability and the key role of the European Court of Justice in relation to preliminary references from domestic courts, enforcement actions against Member States, judicial review of EU law and its development of human rights. It highlights the interplay between these features by focusing on substantive EU topics such as the fundamental freedoms of the free movement of goods, persons and the important area of Competition Law.

    The aims of the module are to give students an appreciation of the theoretical and foundational aspects of EU law as it applies in the UK. The module facilitates a contextual and critical appreciation of the law and politics relating to the administration and governance of the UK State in a period of radical constitutional change (‘Brexit’).

    The module provides a sound understanding of the key features of the EU legal order, its main institutions, the law-making processes and the legal control of administrative powers in the EU and the UK.

    It will provide a sound understanding of the relationship between history, politics, law and economics in the development of the EU.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent
    research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of the Law of the European Union, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The University has a policy that all undergraduates must, at either Level 5 or 6, take a Work Related Learning (WRL) module i.e. a module which requires them to directly experience and operate in the real world of work and to reflect on that episode in order to identify skill and knowledge areas that they need to develop for their career. This module (and “partner” modules, namely, Creating a Winning Business 2 (Level 6) and Creating a Successful Social Enterprise 1 and 2), are module options available to ALL University students to fulfil the University’s WRL requirement.

    This module challenges students to be creative in identifying a new business opportunity and in examining the viability of all aspects of the idea in the real world context e.g. testing potential customers’ views. As a result of the feedback received and enquiries carried out, the idea will change and develop over the duration of the module. Throughout the module, students are required to not only apply the business development theory taught but also to continuously reflect on how they have applied the theory and the skills and knowledge gained from their work. This reflective dimension promotes the development of practical attributes for employment and career progression.

    The QAA Benchmark on Business and Management (2015) emphasises the attribute of “entrepreneurship” and of “the value of real world learning”. In terms of promoting work related skills, the module specifically focuses on practical techniques for generating and developing new business ideas and so develops creative thinking. In addition, it requires students to examine market potential and prepare a “pitch” as if seeking investment. The module requires a high level of self-reliance to pursue their business idea. Students develop an understanding of the role of new ideas in business start-ups, business growth and development.
    These skills and techniques are of practical relevance to anyone considering starting a new business, working for a Small or Medium sized Enterprise (SME) or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a larger organisation where the business environment is constantly evolving and producing new challenges and opportunities.

    For those students keen to go beyond this module and start their own business, they can apply to the Accelerator for access to “seed” money and advice and support.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning
    The module aims to enable students to:
    1. Increase their personal and professional development prior to, during and following gaining work-based learning experience.
    2. Increase and develop critical, self-reflective ability and self-efficacy.
    3. Demonstrate theoretical concepts and transferable competencies in a practical, problem solving context.
    4. Gain critical understanding of current issues, practices and where appropriate relevant policy or legislation within a particular organisational situation.
    5. Explore employment options and consider future career plans.
    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    The broad aim of this module is to develop a grounding in the fundamentals of US foreign policy making in the context of contemporary international relations. In particular, to:

    • Analyse policy making institutions and historical precedents underlying US foreign policy, and to grasp the way those precedents affect America’s approach to global events since the end of the Cold War and the attacks of 9/11.
    • Assess the processes and limitations of US foreign policy making, the contemporary challenges facing the world and the American role in dealing with them, and the expectations of US influence in the world in coming years.
    • Place American foreign policy within the larger theoretical frameworks and approaches to international relations.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    This module examines the structure, values and operation of the US government, including all its principles of exceptionalism, the major institutions and key actors. It examines the policy-making process, electoral politics and the roles of interest groups and the media. It also looks at some major areas of controversy within American politics, such as political ethics, gun control, healthcare (Obamacare), and race and immigration. In the wake of the election of the property-tycoon and celebrity Donald Trump as the President in 2016, it considers the impact of the celebrity politician, social media and cyber-activity in US political life. In particular, this module aims to:
    • examine and analyse the structure and operation of the American government
    • develop awareness of the domestic and international context in which US government makes policy
    • raise awareness of, and enable informed engagement with, contemporary controversial and ethical issues in American government and public policy making

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module explores the practice of modern diplomacy. The first half of the module explores the historical emergence and evolution of diplomacy and the classic texts of diplomatic theory, before going on to concentrate on the roles and functions of traditional diplomatic institutions, systems and processes, such as embassies, foreign ministries, diplomatic services and international organisations.

    The second half of the module explores the main challenges posed to diplomatic practice by global change in recent decades: the rise of inclusive multilateral diplomacy in the UN and other fora; the increasing importance of non-state actors in contemporary diplomacy; the impact of faster air travel enabling leaders to conduct their own diplomacy; the revolution in information and communications technology; and innovations in diplomatic institutions (such as the emergence of the European External Action Service).

    A key theme running through the whole module is the evolving nature of international negotiation, which will be illustrated through detailed case studies of environmental, security and trade diplomacy.

    This is a highly practical module. Students will have opportunities to develop their ability to blog and use Twitter, engage in simulated negotiations and interact with practitioners through visits to embassies and other institutions and/or practitioner classes.

    Read full details.
  • This module provides an introduction to the law of evidence and to legal advocacy skills. It will concentrate upon the main concepts and principles of evidence law and explore their application by the advocate in the courtroom.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module critically examines the nature of governance, public policy and public management at sub-national; national; supranational and international levels. It looks in detail at the key elements of policy making; the role of policy makers; the instruments of policy; and how policies are implemented and managed. It explores the nature, extent and influence of globalisation and its relationship with public policy. It analyses the significance of multi-level governance and examines constitutional changes that have occurred in Britain since 1997 such as devolution to the Celtic periphery. It proceeds to outline the development of the European Union and assesses the impact of the supranational tier of governance. It then looks at substantive areas of public policy including immigration, citizenship and identity; economic policy; environment policy; and international policy. It investigates recent developments in public policy. The module proceeds to explore the implementation and management of public policy in contemporary public services and how they are changing. The pressures for change are elucidated, as are differing forms of service delivery such as decentralisation and contracting. Attempts to improve the quality of public services through initiatives such as Best Value and performance measurement in government are evaluated. As are mechanisms deployed to engage citizens or service users in the process of service design and delivery. The module moves on to assess strategic management and New Public Management. It concludes with a critical review of governance, public policy and public management in the twenty first century. Employability will be an ongoing theme throughout the module.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    “Medical paternalism no longer rules.” per Lord Steyn in Chester v. Afshar [2005] 1 AC 134

    In the current millennium, the public have become increasingly aware of their rights in respect of medical treatment, including the right to be informed of the potential consequences of any treatment, and the right to question the competence and expertise of medical professionals.

    In this module, students will critically examine the principles of tort, criminal law and human rights law which balance the relationship between patients and healthcare workers, studying such matters as consent, patient confidentiality, mental capacity, the right to live and the right to die.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of medical law, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    This is a dynamic, contemporary subject, which forms the basis of several successful legal practices, and so may have a tangible career benefit for students interested in this sector of law.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module aims to:

    • Introduce students to competing theories of peace and conflict
    • Explore the nature and causes of conflict in the contemporary era
    • Provide an understanding of some of the institutions and organisations (governmental and non-governmental) that work in conflict situations
    • Analyse the varied objectives and methods of such organisations
    • Introduce the core practical skills for work in relevant fields, thus enhancing employability

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module explores the changing nature of relationships within and among societies both in the ‘North’ and the ‘global south’ from a multidisciplinary perspective. It focuses on contemporary approaches to global and grass-root movements and their strategy-trends in a variety of cultural and political contexts. Case studies of social movements, their development, expression and impact will form the basis for analysis. Themes include indigenous rights, gender and democracy, food sovereignty, international migration and economic power.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    The broad aim of this module is to develop an understanding of politics in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region, in the context of contemporary international relations, and in particular to:
    • describe and explain the processes by which the states and societies of the contemporary MENA region were formed;
    • explore the main ideological currents that have influenced the political development of the MENA region, particularly those inspired by religion and nationalism;
    • examine the interstate and international relations of the region, focusing on the sources of conflicts and the difficult relationship between the West and the region.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    Property Law is a core module for the LL.B. courses, which introduces students to the key principles of the law relating to real property, one of the foundation subjects of English Law, as identified by the professional legal bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

    It introduces and builds up a critical understanding of the legal concepts regarding the ownership and co-ownership of land in England and Wales and the control of assets. Students study the system of registered and unregistered land; the rules relating to the transfer of title; and the controls on land use.

    Leases, licences, mortgages, easements, restrictive freehold covenants, adverse possession, conveyancing, human rights and torts relating to property will likewise be explained and analysed.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of land law, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of land law.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module provides a contextual introduction to the central areas of UK Public Law. It provides a detailed examination of the history, nature and workings of the UK’s constitution. It also considers the principles of administrative law with particular emphasis on the procedure and substantive grounds for judicial review in English law.

    The aims of the module are to provide students with a working knowledge and understanding of the evolving framework of legal and non-legal obligations which apply between the State and the citizen and between different organs of the State/government.

    It will enable students to develop a critical understanding of the extent and efficiency of control on governmental bodies, in particular, the legitimacy and extent of parliamentary and judicial oversight mechanisms. It will enable students to apply legal principles to theoretical examples in order to draw conclusions and give advice to the citizen.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent
    research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of UK public law and human rights, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills, group participation skills and IT skills (for both research and presentation).

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module will examine how the nature of power in international relations has changed since the ending of the Cold War. The collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s was argued by many to be a triumph of the West’s military and industrial might, ushering in what Francis Fukuyama described as the ‘end of history’ – the triumph of western liberal democratic ideas. However, events since then, not least the attacks of 9/11 and the economic collapse of 2008, have highlighted new threats that exist, the increasing role of non-state actors, and the rise of competing economic powers.

    This module will examine how international politics is changing and how the nature of power - defined as the ability to affect others to obtain the outcomes you want - has evolved. It will show that power is not static, but that it may now be more complex in nature, as innovation, technologies and relationships change.

    This theoretical approach will be applied to consideration of how power may be shifting in the 21st Century from the West to the East, or the so-called “Rest”. This will involve a regional analysis, examining how and why some states are rising in global prominence, e.g. China, India, and Russia, and why the West may (or may not) be in decline.

    The module will also consider the role of such factors as religion, media, and cyberspace in relation to notions of power.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning


    The broad aim of this module is to enable students to apply knowledge of strategy-making and strategic thinking as a historical practice to contemporary problems, and, in particular, to:

    1. Understand the development of strategic theory and practise.
    2. Examine how strategy can be applied by the study of significant case studies.
    3. Examine the nature of strategy and how it relates to both policy and action in the 21st Century.
    4. Encourage students to think as practitioners.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module has three principal aims:

    1. It will explore the historical origins of Union and its predecessor bodies in the first two decades after WWII. What agents and factors facilitated such a innovative development in European political history?
    3. It will explore the political character of the Union. What sort of organisation is it in political terms? How democratic is it?
    4. It will examine its principal policy outputs, including economic, monetary, social and foreign policies

    Read full details.
  • This module provides an overview of the practical position of women under English law, with an examination of the theoretical issues underpinning that position. As an extension of learning module, it is suitable for students from any discipline with an interest in gender and the law.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The broad aims of this module are to understand the fundamentals of security studies and its importance in an increasingly connected world. In particular to:

    • Think in broad, conceptual terms about the changes in international security occasioned by the impact of globalisation, especially since the end of the Cold War in 1989, and evaluate the differing interpretations of its development and assess the processes through which it has occurred over time.
    • Understand “Security” conceptually in both its international and national contexts.
    • Evaluate the contested military and non-military terrain of globalisation and security issues.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    International law is increasingly important to states, organisations and individuals, and impacts on every aspect of modern life.

    This 30 credit module will provide students with a thorough knowledge of the key concepts of international law, such as the sources of international law, the definition of statehood, the principle of self-determination, states’ acquisition of title to territory and jurisdiction over territory and people, state responsibility for unlawful acts, and states’ use of force.

    Knowledge of the key principles and substantive topics will be matched with understanding of the operation of international law in the real world. Students will be encouraged to approach the subject critically and to develop their analytic skills to the highest level.

    The module will introduce students to the current debates and challenges in this subject, with a focus on topical examples which will bring the subject to life and motivate students to explore the subject more fully.

    Teaching will be by a combination of lecture, seminar (academic discussion) and workshop (developing academic and transferable skills such as critical thinking and oral and written communication skills).

    The module will be of interest to all students who take an interest in current affairs, international relations, the international order, international peace and security.

    The module is relevant to a wide range of careers in law, government, politics, international relations, the media, and international business.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    The module requires the students to undertake detailed, critical research into a law topic of their choice and write a research plan and essay of 8,000 words.

    Students are assigned a supervisor based on their choice of topic.

    The module is structured so that students are required to present an assessed research plan, which then provides the infrastructure for their extended essay. Students are expected to engage with regular supervision throughout the process.

    Students will develop an advanced understanding of their chosen specialist area of law.
    The extended essay module will more specifically
    • allow students independently to research and develop an expert understanding of an area of law of their choice
    • improve both their research and independent study skills
    • enhance their ability to develop critical arguments
    By researching their chosen area of law, students will be equipped with specialist skills and knowledge, to help them stand out in the job market.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    The module requires the students to undertake detailed, critical research into a legal topic of their choice and write a research plan and essay of 5,000 words.

    Students are assigned a supervisor based on their choice of topic.

    The module is structured so that students are required to present an assessed research plan, which then provides the infrastructure for their extended essay. Students are expected to engage with regular supervision throughout the process.

    Students will develop an advanced understanding of their chosen specialist area of law.
    The extended essay module will more specifically
    • allow students independently to research and develop an expert understanding of an area of law of their choice
    • improve both their research and independent study skills
    • enhance their ability to develop critical arguments
    By researching their chosen area of law, students will be equipped with specialist skills and knowledge, to help them stand out in the job market.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This core module providing a vocational and advanced undergraduate research element for PIR courses aims to:
    • enable the student to gain a useful experience of the working environment
    • enable the student to enhance and extend their learning experience by applying and building on their academic skills and capabilities by tackling real life problems in the workplace.
    • provide the student with an opportunity to design a research proposal relevant to their placement.
    • allow the student to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.
    • enable the student to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.
    • offer a medium for the student to report upon their work placement experience.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning
    The module aims to enable students to:
    1. Increase their personal and professional development prior to, during and following gaining work-based learning experience.
    2. Increase and develop critical, self-reflective ability and self-efficacy.
    3. Demonstrate theoretical concepts and transferable competencies in a practical, problem solving context.
    4. Gain critical understanding of current issues, practices and where appropriate relevant policy or legislation within a particular organisational situation.
    5. Explore employment options and consider future career plans.
    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    This module providing an advanced research element for PIR undergraduate courses aims to:
    • enable the student to demonstrate an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, and be able to apply analytical techniques, problem solving and project management skills commensurate with a short dissertation.
    • enable the student to synthesise skills and knowledge and apply them successfully to complex issues in a short dissertation.
    • provide an opportunity to design a short dissertation relevant to their degree.
    • allow the student to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.
    • enable the student to undertake relevant research and write up findings in short dissertation form.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module providing an advanced research element for PIR undergraduate courses aims to:
    • enable the student to demonstrate an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, and be able to apply analytical techniques, problem solving and project management skills.
    • enable the student to synthesise skills and knowledge and apply them successfully to complex issues.
    • provide an opportunity to design a research project relevant to their degree.
    • allow the student to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.
    • enable the student to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    The work placement module enables students to gain academic credit for learning through work undertaken in a legal work environment. The work may be paid employment (part-time or full-time) or an unpaid work placement with a suitable organisation. This might be a firm of solicitors, a barristers’ chambers, a legal department of a commercial enterprise, a firm licensed to offer legal services, or a not-for-profit legal advice service such as a Law Centre or Citizens Advice Bureau.

    Students are required to undertake a minimum of 105 hours in a legal workplace, equivalent to 15 full working days (based on 7 working hours per day). The minimum hours can be completed full-time or part-time during the summer after completion of level 5, or part-time over the level 6 academic year.

    The module aims to develop of students’ employability skills and competences and their abilities of self-reflection and personal development and career planning. The module builds on prior learning gained from academic studies and other relevant experience.

    The focus is on oral and written communication skills; the ability to work independently and as part of a team; the ability to manage time efficiently, to prioritise tasks, to complete tasks accurately in a timely way and to comply with time limits; problem-solving skills – finding appropriate solutions to challenging problems by the application of law or other theory; awareness of professional codes of conduct and their application in practice. The development of initiative/innovation and commercial awareness is encouraged.

    The assessment promotes development of the student’s ability to evaluate their skills and competences, to evaluate their contribution to the organisation, to reflect on the development of professional skills and competencies necessary to their graduate career goals, and to action plan in relation to graduate career and academic goals.

    Students are supported in their learning and development through group sessions and individual guidance and feedback. Students attend four group introductory sessions at which the module leader explains the requirements of the module, the skills focus, and the assessment. Individual support is available on request throughout the academic year. Detailed guidance on the module requirements and the assessment is provided via weblearn

    The responsibility for finding suitable placement lies with the student, but support is available to find and apply for suitable opportunities through the GSBL Placements and Employability Unit and University Careers service.

    The module leader will assess the suitability of the proposed placement and approve as appropriate.

    The module is open to level 6 students on law undergraduate courses and other undergraduate courses in another discipline and law.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    To introduce students to issues of diversity, equality and minority rights
    To broaden students’ knowledge of political practice (parties, elections, systems of government and law-making)
    To add to students’ understanding of how international governmental and non-governmental organisations work
    To introduce students to the concepts of gender and patriarchy, and feminist political and IR theories
    To encourage students to develop informed criticisms of mainstream political and IR theories and practices

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module looks at the alleged ‘crisis’ in contemporary Africa, focusing on problems of economic, social and political development. This module aims to challenge assumptions about the problems of contemporary Africa by examining these problems in detail and by looking at Africa’s place in the world.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Civil Liberties and Human Rights introduces students to the key principles of the law relating to civil liberties and human rights.

    The module gives a clear, coherent and up to date account of the law of human rights and civil liberties, concentrating on the position of civil liberties and human rights protection in the light of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the standards of human rights protection laid down in the European Convention on Human Rights

    It introduces and builds up critical understanding of the legal concepts which govern individual and collective rights and responsibilities, including the constraints the state may place on the citizen’s exercise of his or her human rights.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, legal drafting and academic writing in the context of the law of civil liberties and human rights, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law. It will encourage and enable students to develop a sophisticated understanding of the relationship that exists - in terms of specific individual rights and freedoms - between the State and the citizen in the UK today and how the legal, social and political conflicts and tensions which are intrinsic to that relationship influence policy, decision-making and legislation.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills and by
    the practising of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module introduces students to company law and includes the formation, constitution and management of companies, together with share issue, share capital, loan capital and selected aspects of insolvency law.

    Students will also examine – and look behind – the corporate veil, making a critical evaluation of the rules of corporate governance.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent
    research, critical analysis and academic writing in the context of company law, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law.

    It is a vital and dynamic topic for anyone interested in working in the corporate sector, and anyone who needs to know how businesses operate.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module aims to:

    • Examine a range of approaches to the cessation of contemporary conflicts and the conditions that may be necessary for peace
    • Explore the differing mechanisms and strategies for securing peace, including negotiation, mediation and arbitration
    • Focus upon both the domestic and international actors involved in these processes
    • Provide students with an understanding of relevant theories and empirical material for comparative analysis

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    Environmental law covers a wide range of concepts. It includes a consideration of the protection of natural resources through the traditional aspects of law but also through a range of principles and policy considerations.

    Increasingly, the effectiveness of environmental protection requires a consideration of the impact of business, not only as part of the problem of environmental degradation, but also as part of the solution to the future protection of exhaustible natural resources.

    Students will be able to explore a range of selected contemporary environmental issues including climate change and renewable energy. Issues of sustainable development are underpinned by aspects of environmental justice and will be considered from domestic and global perspectives.

    Overall, the module will aim to contextualise environmental law within the wider constructs of socio-economic and ethical considerations.

    This module aims to facilitate a critical approach to an understanding of environmental regulation and the policy through the exploration of contemporary issues at all levels of law and policy making (including the domestic, European and international).

    Skills:

    The module also aims to develop knowledge, research encourage good methodology in researching these topics.

    There are many career opportunities within the environmental field including work as an environmental lawyer (public or private practice), public policy advisor, working within government agencies e.g. DEFRA or the Environmental Agency or for NGO’s such as Friends of the Earth.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module engages with the contemporary debate about the theory and practice of human rights, about their origin, the ideal of their universality, their imperfect institutionalization, and the challenges facing their implementation in a world of domestic populisms and international conflict.

    Module aims

    To provide a historical and critical introduction to ideas and institutions of human rights, and to evaluate their relation to state sovereignty and international conflict.
    To provide an understanding of the relation of theory to practice, facts to values, politics to ethics, and ideas of universality to both cultural tradition and relativical relativity.
    To relate philosophical theories and propositions to practices and issues of political, social, economic, legal and international justice.
    To elaborate arguments that are at once logical, evidenced and reflectively ethical.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module provides students with an understanding of the legal concepts of immigration and nationality. This will involve a study of the rules relating to temporary admissions, settlement, deportation, illegal entry, removal and asylum.

    Students will gain a critical appreciation of the rules, policies, Conventions and cases which are integral to this field of law, and become aware of the variety of applications that may be made in the tribunals, both through independent research and by visits to the relevant tribunals.

    They will also develop an understanding of the ethical implications arising out of UK Immigration policy as evidenced in the most recent case law and legislation.

    The module aims to develop several key transferable skills including independent research, critical analysis, legal drafting and academic writing in the context of the law of immigration and asylum, emphasising the use of primary and secondary sources of law. The preparation and delivery of the assessed group oral presentation will also develop communication and team-working skills.

    Student employability will be enhanced by the development both of these skills, and by
    the practise of written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The broad aim of this module is to question the assumptions about contemporary Latin America as a region and its place in the world and, in particular, to examine:

    • the underlying political ideas and trends instrumental in shaping Latin American politics today, including the role of the USA;
    • the internal politics of modern Latin American states and the role of these states within the region;
    • the impact due to globalisation and the rise of political and economic importance of other developing regions;
    • to encourage students to think about the complexities of problem-solving in this context.

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  • Whilst some commentators at the end of the 20th century adopted the view that ‘God is dead’ and that religion no longer had a role to play in society that view has changed. Increasingly religion is becoming an important issue. There are arguments about the role of religion in public life. There are conversations about religious schools and religious clothing. There are discussions about religious courts and whether modern legal disputes can be settled by religious law. Attitudes towards religion have arguably progressed from tolerance to the promotion of religious liberty as a right. New laws have been enacted, interpreted and administered. Have these new laws increased the protection given to religious individuals and groups? How have new laws interacted with older laws concerning religion? ‘Law and religion’ possesses the ‘academic credibility, intellectual substance and appropriateness of subject matter’ to be treated as an academic sub-discipline. There is a clear area of study. It is accepted as ‘applied law’ rather than ‘theoretical’ law and is concerned with the recognition and regulation of religious activities. Law and religion is also concerned with the study of religious law; the interaction of civil and criminal law with religion; religious freedom as a human right; the legal position of religious groups; legal definitions of religion; recognition and enforcement of religious law. This module will be of interest to those students wishing to embark on careers in law, the community or social sector, education, central or local government or with regulators or professional bodies. It will be of interest to any student who wishes to develop an understanding of the relationship between law and religion and law and society at large.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This cutting-edge module explores one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields of contemporary diplomatic studies and an area which has seen a wide variety of innovations in state practice in recent decades. As public opinion has come to be seen as increasingly influential and important in world politics, states and other international actors have rediscovered public and cultural diplomacy, a form of diplomatic practice in which states engage with publics both abroad and at home. Due to changes in global communications, this form of diplomacy is undergoing rapid change, which makes it especially interesting and important.
    The module examines the changing nature of public and cultural diplomacy in the context of the evolution of global political communications. It explores the nature of international political communication, evaluating key concepts such as propaganda, place branding and strategic communications, and examines the role of culture in world politics more broadly, including media such as film and the internet, as well as key actors such as celebrity diplomats. It explores competing definitions and interpretations of public and cultural diplomacy, along with how their practice has changed in recent decades, especially since the end of the Cold War.
    This is a practically-oriented module which will ensure equitability in student learning experiences towards the overall degree qualification. . Blended learning is encouraged in the classroom through the use of multimedia and internet resources. This is complimented by students gaining experience of the nature of contemporary public diplomacy and international political communication through visits to embassies, guest lectures by serving or former public diplomats, and role-play exercises and simulations.

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  • Companies and Governments frequently need to raise money from Individuals and organisations to fund their activities This module is intended to provide students with a lawyer’s perspective and understanding of the financial and taxation systems and the significance of fiscal policy. The module will introduce students to taxation, investment, financial markets and transactions and examine how core legal concepts are applied in practical contexts. Students will analyse the regulatory and legal framework, the relationship between substantive law and financial regulation, questions of law and risk in financial markets, the legal aspects of taxation, banking, lending, securities and derivatives activity, and the legal and regulatory context of financial market failures. Consideration will also be given to the interplay between law and ethics within the realms of finance.

    In light of the central role that finance and taxation plays in the economy this module will be particularly relevant to students wishing to embark on careers in law, commerce, industry, central or local government or with regulators or professional bodies. It will be of interest to any student who wishes to develop an understanding of the relationship between law and finance.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module aims to:

    • Examine competing theories of the modern state
    • Evaluate the historical evolution of modern states
    • Compare and contrast the range of different types of state across the globe, from democracies to authoritarian states
    • Analyse the state in relation to contemporary 21st century issues, such as globalization, social welfare provision, and protest movements
    • Encourage confidence in the use of appropriate analytical, written and oral skills, to enhance students’ transferable skills and employability

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

What our students say

“In the first year module, Contract Law, we had a fantastic staff that taught us the basics of law very well. The same with the EU law in the final year. Also in the International Relations subject area, modules had excellent teaching staff in all levels of the course.”
National Student Survey 2016

After the course

The course prepares you for careers in organisations ranging from the The Foreign Office, the United Nations and the European Union, to international companies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) specialising in international development, overseas aid, human rights and environmental fields, and the media.

Students have also gained employment in research and teaching, international business, the media and political campaigns. Additionally, we have students working in a variety of overseas positions throughout the world.

Many also go on to be successful in postgraduate study.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

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How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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