Mathematics - BSc (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Entry requirements Modular structure What our students say After the course How to apply Meet the team Visit us

Why study this course?

This intensive course has proven extremely popular with our students due to built-in opportunities for work placements, the balanced programme of both applicable and theoretical mathematics, and our enthusiastic, knowledgeable staff who help you develop both your problem-solving and IT skills. 

In the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of all 2017 graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

Through this course, you’ll build your knowledge, understanding and expertise in a range of mathematical methods, and develop the career-focused, transferable skills that employers are looking for. You’ll learn to use mathematical reasoning in a variety of contexts and apply your knowledge in problem-solving situations.

You’ll begin by studying the fundamentals of mathematics, such as calculus and linear algebra, and proofs and structures. As the course goes on, you’ll have the opportunity to specialise in your areas of interest such as cryptography and coding, the mathematics of infinity and financial modelling.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through tests, exams, essays, individual and group research projects, and a final year dissertation. You'll receive regular, supportive feedback throughout the course.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) as meeting in part the educational requirement for chartered status.

Fees and key information

Course type Undergraduate
UCAS code G100
Entry requirements View
Apply now

Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades CCE in three A levels or minimum grades BB in at least two A levels, one of which must be from mathematics or numerate subjects (or a minimum of 80 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma; or Advanced Diploma; or Progression Diploma; or Access to HE Diploma with 60 credits)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

If you don’t have traditional qualifications or can’t meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Mathematics BSc Extended Degree.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2018/19 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    The module covers basic mathematical techniques of differential and integral calculus and of linear algebra that will be of later use throughout Mathematics and related degree courses. The module builds on and extends concepts learned in A-Level Mathematics. The contents covered and the skills developed are fundamental to the development of mathematical competence. Calculus and linear algebra form an important foundation for further studies in Mathematics, Finance, Statistics and Engineering.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module develops the mathematical and statistical tools that are used in the mathematics of finance. It also introduces methods of analysing data using appropriate statistical software.
    This module introduces the basic terminologies used in finance and develops the mathematical techniques to solve problems in the area of finance. Descriptive statistics and statistical techniques that are useful to present, analyse and make inferences about data are also introduced. A selection of suitable software (e.g. Excel, R, SPSS) will enable students to analyse data in order to make informed decisions.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces a range of numerical approximation methods for solving a variety of mathematical problems, including iterative methods for solving nonlinear equations and systems of linear equations. This module also introduces a mathematical programming package that is commonly used for solving a variety of problems. The application of these techniques, through the medium of mathematical problems enables the student to become proficient in the use of algebraic software which is used in most mathematical related jobs such as working in industry, financial markets and teaching.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module develops the skills necessary to support academic study at degree level. It will also develop reflective learning and action planning via the Personal Development Planning (PDP) process. The first term topics will look into history of mathematics , development of modern number system and introduce idea of mathematical proofs. Different proof techniques will be covered using examples from Set Theory and Number Theory.
    The topics covered in the second term part of this module is to introduces the main ideas of graph theory and includes a variety of algorithms.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    The module extends the students’ knowledge of the techniques of calculus and introduces the concept of differential equations.

    This module aims to give students a thorough understanding of the analytical techniques available to solve first and second order ordinary differential equations.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The topics covered in the first term of this module is to introduce formal inductive and recursive structure on the natural numbers. This structure underlies many aspects of program design and validation, and formal methods. An introduction to combinatorics and the generetaing functions are designed to enhance the students algorithmic tool set.

    The topics covered in the second term part of this module is to introduce students to the abstract algebraic structures of groups, which arise from the ideas of symmetries and of vector and matrix calculus repectively. These two primary examples of algebraic structures have applications across science and engineering, and also provide a firm foundation of necessary basic algebraic notions for the student to further their study mathematical study.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The module extends the students’ knowledge of the techniques of calculus and introduces the concept of multivariable Calculus as well as calculus of vectors.

    This module introduces Vector-Valued Functions and extends ideas of calculus of one dimension to Vector-Valued Functions.

    Prior knowledge: MA4010 Calculus and Linear Algebra

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module introduces a selected range of Operational Research techniques that are commonly used for solving a variety of small to medium size problems, through the medium of spreadsheet and other suitable software. It also enables the student to investigate real-life problems of business and industrial problems of varied complexity.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module enables the student to further develop and apply numerical techniques to a range of problems including the solution of ordinary differential equations related to both physical and financial/economic models.

    This module enables the student to further develop and apply numerical techniques to a range of problems including the solution of ordinary differential equations related to both physical and financial/economic models.
    The aims are:
    To enable students to apply approximation techniques to problems of both theoretical and practical importance and understand the cause of and interpret the degree of error involved;

    To prepare students with the tools necessary for solving a range of problems in situations suitably described by ordinary differential equations and by difference equations;

    To understand modelling with linear and nonlinear dynamical systems and iterative methods of solution;

    To enable students to understand and manipulate coded programmes for software packages such as Maple for solving larger problems.

    To develop students’ knowledge, confidence and problem solving skills leading to further academic progression and future employability in this area.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The module covers mathematical and statistical modelling techniques that are applied in making decisions in areas of finance. It also enables the student to investigate real-life statistical data.
    This module introduces important financial concepts and develops statistical modelling techniques. Statistical regression models are applied to financial data (e.g., credit scoring, default time analysis) and mathematical modelling of stock and option prices is investigated. A selection of suitable software (e.g. Excel, R, SPSS) will enable students to analyse data in order to make informed decisions. The students will develop skills in statistical and mathematical modelling of real data to aid future employability.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module serves as a core module for all maths students to do a one-semester project in the broader sense and as an alternative to the Faculty’s 30 credit Project module. The feature of the module is summarised as follows.
    1. Students will follow their own interest to pursue an individualised study independently under staff supervision.
    2. Students taking this module with the same supervisor may study the same subject but the assessments should be individualised.
    3. The allocation of supervisors to students should be done at the end of year two. Students can take this module in either autumn or spring period.
    The programme of study is very much individualised and there is a variety of format. The following are just two typical examples: (a) Pursue an investigative study on a particular topic, with an assessment of written report plus viva, and (b) A self-negotiated study in any subject area following a printed textbook or online material, assessed by a coursework consisting of a mixture of solutions to exercise questions, a written report, and a viva (oral presentation). In the later case, there must be an “investigative and independent factor” in the study. Any other innovative format is encouraged.

    The module aims to
    1. Provide students with an opportunity to pursue an academic area of interest independently, subject to the availability of an appropriate supervisor, where a taught module is not available.
    2. Develop students’ ability to search the internet and library for useful information.
    3. Enrich students’ experience of self-negotiated study.
    4. Improve students’ employability by enhancing their skills through report writing and reflection on independent learning.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module extends students’ knowledge of linear algebra and calculus, providing greater depth and rigour for these essential topics.
    The aim of the first part of the module is to introduce students to the abstract algebraic structures of vector spaces, developing on the material on linear algebra learnt at level 4. This primary example of algebraic structures has applications across science and engineering, and also provides a firm foundation of necessary basic algebraic notions for the student to further their study mathematical study.
    The aim of the second part of the module is to develop a rigorous approach to the analysis of functions of a real and a complex variable. Further topics in complex integration are also covered and students are introduced to applications of these topics to improper integration of functions of a real variable.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module develops a rigorous approach to the whole process of solving problems arising from real life scenarios and the module consists of providing solutions to a number of such problems. For each given problem, the process of dealing with it includes an initial analysis, identification of the main factors involved, establishment of a differential or difference equation as a mathematical model of the problem, analytical and/or numerical analysis to solutions of the equation, making predictions and drawing conclusions to the model, and feedback to solving the problem.

    The module aims to
    1. Introduce the process of model building from a non-mathematical description of a physical or industrial process or in a business application.
    2. Introduce the idea of mathematical modelling as a means of solving real problems.
    3. Present powerful tools of differential/difference equations to analyse the models in order to make appropriate predictions.
    4. Develop the student's ability to work effectively in-groups.
    5. Improve the student's communication skills through report writing and presentation.
    Pre-requisite knowledge: MA5011 Further Calculus and MA5052 Differential Equations (studied or Co-requisite)

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The module enables students to undertake an appropriate short period of professional activity, related to their course at level 6, with a business or community organisation and to gain credit for their achievements. The activity can be a professional training, a volunteering activity, employment activity, an activity within the School of Computing and Digital Media Virtual Business Environment (VBE), placement or business start-up activity.
    For the purpose of this module – the VBE will be also be recognised as ‘the employer’.
    It is expected student should work for 150 hours which should be recorded clearly (in a learning log for instance) in the portfolio. The 150 hours can be completed in 25 working days in a FT mode, or spread over a semester in a PT mode.
    Students should register with the module leader to be briefed on the module, undergo induction and Work Based Learning planning and to have the Work Based Learning approved, before they take up the opportunity. It is essential that students are made aware that both the “Work Based Learning agreement” and relevant “health and safety checklist” where applicable need to be approved before starting the learning activity.

    The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to:
    • gain a useful experience of the working environment and the career opportunities available on graduation.
    • undertake a work-based project appropriate to their academic level.
    • enhance and extend their learning experience by applying and building on their academic skills and abilities by tackling real life problems in the workplace.
    • enhance professional and personal development.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon

    The module is an introduction to modern ideas in cryptography. It proves the background to the essential techniques and algorithms of cryptography in widespread use today, as well as the essentials of number theory underlying them.
    The module looks at symmetric ciphersystems and their use in classical cryptography as well as public key systems developed to support internet commerce and deliver data security for private individuals.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    The module is an introduction to modern ideas in error correcting codes. It provides the background to the essential techniques and algorithms in widespread use today, as well as the essentials of number theory and finite field theory underlying them.
    Error correcting codes are an important part of the data communications theory and allow a message to be recovered even if errors have been introduced during transmission. The elegant mathematics of finite field theory is introduced to develop multiple error correcting codes with a wide range of communications applications.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The module introduces the students to financial forecasting using modern statistical modelling techniques. Its aim is to prepare the student for work in a quantitative commercial or scientific environment. Students will be developing problem solving skills. For each given problem, the process of dealing with it includes, searching for appropriate data sets, establishing the right statistical/financial techniques to use, fitting appropriate models, critically appraising the models using diagnostic model tools and finally interpreting the models and drawing conclusions.

    Read full details.

Modules for this course are to be confirmed. Please check back at a later date or call our course enquiries team on +44 (0)20 7133 4200 for details.

What our students say

“At London Met I don’t feel as though I only study mathematics, I feel I’m part of a community of people who share my passion and drive to do well. If I could give any advice to anyone thinking of joining the mathematics subject area at London Met it would be: stop thinking and secure your place, you will never look back.”

“I decided to do this course because I love mathematics and this course has given me the opportunity to deepen this love. I am able to study modules that I enjoy with other students who share the same interests as me. Friendly teachers, well-equipped labs and the library are very helpful and encourage me to explore more fields of mathematics.”

 

After the course

This degree will prepare you for a career in not just mathematics but in a number of fields where a good head for numbers is essential. You could go on to work in the computing, finance, scientific research and development or statistical industries to name but a few.

Many of our previous graduates have gone on to complete a PGCE in Secondary Mathematics and become mathematics teachers or tutors. Others have found work in related fields, such as international analysis and reporting at Time Inc UK, and accounting at Brackman Chopra LLP.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

News and success stories

Meet the team

Visit us

You may also like...