Skye Eade

Skye Eade is a PhD candidate currently conducting research that aims to understand the art making process in the works of artists with dyslexia. Skye is a London-based freelance artist who holds a degree from Canterbury Christchurch University and a Master of Arts from the University of East London.

 

 

Skye Eade

Art-making and Dyslexia: The Sublime as Frame for Artistic Creation

Supervisors:
Dr Johanna Hällsten and Dr Jacek Ludwig Scarso

Abstract:
The connection between art and the sublime is well established. Sublime concepts such as human sufferings - although formless, infinite and invisible - can be represented through art. But most research focuses on the sublimity in the works of well-known artists while little is known about the representation of the sublime in the works of artists with dyslexia or the specific art making process that they use in their pursuit of the sublime. The association between dyslexia and artistic creativity presents compelling evidence on the need to investigate the lived experiences and limitations posed by their disability.

Using interpretative phenomenological analysis as a framework, this practice-led research aims to understand the art making process in the works of artists with dyslexia and how they achieve transcendence through sublimity in their art. This project will use art-based research methods to probe on the life, works and notions of the sublime of artists with dyslexia, concurrent with the development of my own artwork. It will utilise various visual arts research techniques such as art workshops, video diaries, exemplary works and interviews with selected dyslexic artists alongside reflexive documentation. The practical component of the project will culminate in an exhibition using various media that aims to re-create an experience and sense of the sublime.

Skye is a London-based freelance artist operating as a sole trader. He has developed a genre of work over the years exploring form and matter (hylomorphism). His main interest has been to study kinetic forms of light on and within water, which conveys affinity with the sublime and the essence of spirituality. The concept of zeroing in on a still image of turbulent water (for example) and then exploring those shapes is a distinctive manner of the artist. More often, the work needs to be viewed from a distance to appreciate true perspective.

Skye holds degrees from Canterbury Christchurch University and a Master of Arts from the University of East London and is currently conducting a PhD with London Met that aims to understand the art making process in the works of artists with dyslexia.