Criminology and Psychopathology - MSc

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Our teaching plans for autumn 2021 Entry requirements Modular structure Where this course can take you How to apply

Why study this course?

On our Criminology and Psychopathology MSc course you will develop your understanding of a range of key psychological and criminological theories, practices and perspectives involved in crime and mental health.

More about this course

The aim of this course is to provide you with an up-to-date multidisciplinary scientific and academic knowledge of criminal behaviour within a mental health context, which is particularly useful if you wish to pursue a career in crime prevention and rehabilitation.

You will consider theoretical and practical issues relating to the main factors influencing crime from biological, social, cultural and psychological perspectives. The course aims to contribute to the training needs of all those that have a role to play in providing services within criminal justice and across the areas of health, social welfare, education and youth justice services. It also provides an opportunity for a career change.

You will explore a range of specialist topics such as:

  • the sociological approach to crime, criminology and criminological theory
  • the status of the victim throughout the criminal process
  • the relationship between psychology and crime
  • the impact of mental health issues within health and criminal justice systems

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of methods, of which the exact nature will be determined by the options you take in the spring semester.

A range of methods will allow for the demonstration of academic learning through mechanisms that support employability skills. You will be assessed through essays, case studies, oral presentations, critical and systematic reviews, as well as qualitative and quantitative research reports. You will be required to write research reports that include data analysis, which will also be reflected in the 60-credit dissertation.

Fees and key information

Course type
Postgraduate
Entry requirements View
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Our teaching plans for autumn 2021

We are planning to return to our usual ways of teaching this autumn including on-campus activities for your course. However, it's still unclear what the government requirements on social distancing and other restrictions might be, so please keep an eye on our Covid-19 pages for further updates as we get closer to the start of the autumn term.

Entry requirements

You will be required to have:

  • a lower second class honours degree with 2:2 (or above) or equivalent

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Any university-level qualifications or relevant experience you gain prior to starting university could count towards your course at London Met. Find out more about applying for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL).

English language requirements

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2021/22 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    The module seeks to enable students to:

     identify and critically assess contemporary developments in criminology
     explore the theories used in current research, including neoclassicism; biosocial approaches, developmental and life-course criminology; and critical realism

    The teaching will be focused on exploring some of the contemporary issues relevant to criminology and underpinning this by making links tor relevant theories. The module will seek to accommodate the varying previous experiences found in MSc groups by providing a contextual knowledge of the subject matter linked to further research with a view to allowing students to present in depth analysis and evidence of research on their chosen issues.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The main aim of this module is to provide students with core knowledge and understanding of approaches to explaining criminal behaviour and its impact upon individuals and society. More specifically, the aims are:

    To provide an overview of the measurement of crime and factors influencing the degree of error in this measurement.
    To provide an account of psychological factors that are related to or help to explain crime at both a general level and in terms of specific offences (e.g., arson) and specific offender groups (e.g., juveniles).
    To evaluate the contribution of psychology to the explanation of criminal behaviour relative to and in interaction with explanatory frameworks and factors from other disciplines.

    To provide a brief introduction to victimology.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    This introductory module will focus on the theoretical explanations of psychopathology from a biological, social, behavioural and cognitive perspective across the lifespan. Using formal classification systems including the DSM-5, it will provide an eclectic and multidisciplinary approach to understanding psychopathology. Various theoretical frameworks in both understanding and management of psychological problems will be explored.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    The module is designed for inclusion in postgraduate psychology courses where students entering the course have some experience of psychology and research methods, but less than would normally be expected from a BPS accredited degree in psychology. The aim of this module is to introduce students to general principles of research design and the epistemological issues associated with different approaches. Student will be introduced to a range of methods for data collection and analysis including both quantitative and qualitative approaches.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • summer studies

    This module supports the process of planning and executing a research project.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon

    The module explores the factors among children and young people, which are identified, through research, as being associated with future offending. The module starts by looking at the research and theoretical issues underpinning ‘risk factors’ and then moves on to look at early intervention programmes which have aim to target children who are identified as at risk, and how they might prevent future offending. Students are encouraged to consider critically the theory, ethics, and impact of these interventions

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module allows students to explore the relationship between key aspects of the law, rights and code of professionals’ ethics within mental health. This module will look at the science base behind legal and policy developments across a range of mental health problems.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module explores the relationship between the state and terrorism and considers how the nation state has been the perpetrator and a motivating factor behind terrorist acts, as well as considering other reasons behind such acts of violence. Students will consider the role of the state as a protector of its citizens has been challenged by its own actions and by terrorist organisations including groups such as ISIS.
    The module goes on to outline contemporary terrorist tactics and reviews the impact on national and international responses to terrorism

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Where this course can take you

Our Criminology and Psychopathology MSc will provide you with opportunities to enter and/or progress within a diverse range of occupations including but not restricted to:

  • psychology (and related disciplines eg criminology, sociology)
  • health practitioners (eg nurses, key workers or GPs)
  • social workers
  • probation, prison and police services

The course also provides additional benefit if you wish to pursue further study in
clinical psychology and/or forensic psychology.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

How to apply

Use the apply button to begin your application.

If you require a Student visa and wish to study a postgraduate course on a part-time basis, please read our how to apply information for international students to ensure you have all the details you need about the application process.



When to apply

You are advised to apply as early as possible as applications will only be considered if there are places available on the course.

To find out when teaching for this degree will begin, as well as welcome week and any induction activities, view our academic term dates.

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