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Film and Broadcast Production - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

This practical film production course is specifically designed to give you the skills and experience you need for a successful career in film and television. Taught in London’s East End, home to a vibrant creative industries community, you'll be immersed in a busy and creative environment with opportunities to participate in film festivals and work commissioned by high profile clients. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

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This exciting course challenges you to develop and produce effective and engaging screen stories: involving you in practical production work in an innovative studio structure and providing you with the opportunity to work on live projects with clients throughout the course.

Ideal for students who want to learn specialist film production skills supported by a flexible education in broader media practice, the course places a strong emphasis on the media industries.

The teaching is undertaken by practising filmmakers and theorists, receiving support from guest speakers. Students are also encouraged to undertake a work placement as a part of their study. One of the courses major innovations is that most of the teaching takes place in practical studios, where you will be offered live projects with clients, ranging from Benetton to the Bank of England. Last year, some of our students undertook location filming on a  feature film which now has cinema distribution. You will visit film festivals such as the London Film Festival with students in previous years also attending the Berlin Film Festival where they watched screenings, enjoyed sessions with film makers and developed their professional networks. You will also gain valuable experience for your CV though live project work for internal and external clients.

As the course has developed we have placed an increasing emphasis on public exhibition and festival submission. This gives you opportunities to produce increasingly sophisticated work. Throughout your studies you will be making and screening your films for your peers, tutors, industry professionals and the public, culminating in The Cass Summer Show where you will have the opportunity to screen your films at the prestigious National Film Theatre on the Southbank. This, along with innovations such as The Cass Cinema Academy, creates a rich and vibrant atmosphere in which you will develop as practitioners. You can see examples of work by students and alumni of the course online in The Cass Cinema.

Assessment

Students are assessed via coursework essays and practical project work. Final year students will also undertake a major project and a dissertation.

Professional accreditation

Prior experience and qualifications can be accredited, allowing direct entry to Level 2 of the degree, subject to available places.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you will normally be expected to obtain:

  • for entry in the 2016-17 academic year: 280 UCAS points from at least two A Level or equivalent Level 3 qualifications in relevant art and design subjects
  • for entry in the 2017-18 academic year: a minimum of grades BBC in three relevant A level subjects in the arts, humanities and social sciences (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification in relevant art and design subjects) plus a portfolio review

We encourage applications from International/EU students with equivalent qualifications. We also accept mature students with diverse backgrounds and experiences.

Suitable applicants living in the UK will be invited to a portfolio interview. Applicants living outside the UK will be required to submit a portfolio of work via email.

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Film, Photography and Media Extended Degree (with Foundation Year).

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module offers students the opportunity to learn through engagement with practical projects in the studio. At the end of this module the student will have completed a substantial piece of work. In doing so, they will have travelled a journey through a production process that typically includes pre-production, experimentation, development and resolution.

    The module introduces students to the working practices of project work.

    At this level, the student selects a project from a menu of choices.

    This module is studied alongside and in integral relationship with MD4002 Media Skills and Practice 1.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    The module offers a sequence of three intensive programmes or ‘mini-blocks’, tailored to the interests of specific groups of students. The module engages the student in thinking about their subject area, how it is defined and practiced, the richness of its resources, and how it opens up questions of context. In particular the module investigates how context might be framed, for example culturally, historically, economically, socially, theoretically or through practice. Students are encouraged to see connections and reflect on what they see in ways that build skills of communication and help articulate ideas. The module also helps the student, through learning how to identify, access and use knowledge profitably, to become knowledgeable about their subject area, its extent, its language and conventions, its history and practice.

    The three mini-blocks have equally weighted single assessments. The assessments include a range of different modes of written assignments, for example, Patchwork, Case Study, or Essay.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module introduces students to the critical and reflective viewing of film & television using established and appropriate methods of analysis. Students are introduced to and develop skills in media analysis. They also develop an understanding of the contexts in which media forms, styles and exhibition practices have developed.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module introduces the skills, tools and methods that form the foundations for future practice as an animator, filmmaker or music technologist.

    Students learn through engagement in a series of practical projects designed to gradually develop relevant skills in the student’s chosen area of specialisation. At the end of this module the student will have completed a workbook that contains a mini-portfolio of assignments and a narrative of the working practices they have engaged with. The workbook/portfolio is designed to be a window on the process and will also document the student’s practice in MD4001 Creative Studio Practice 1.

    Central to the module will be an exploration of the overlap between technology, creativity and self-reflective critical practice.

    This module is studied alongside and in integral relationship with MD4001 Creative Studio Practice 1. In addition, the module introduces four areas of development, the career dossier, career plan, show reel, and exhibition skills that run throughout the course.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module offers students the opportunity to learn through engagement with practical projects in the stu-dio, to work with others in a collaborative way and to engage with issues that contextualise their practice. At the end of this module the student will have completed a substantial piece of work. In doing so, they will have travelled a journey through a production process, worked with other people and engaged with issues and external stakeholders.

    At the beginning of the module students will be introduced to the working practices of group and teamwork.

    At this level, the student is offered a choice of ‘live’ projects. These projects might be competitions, live briefs from external organisations or self-generated projects around themes.

    This module is taught alongside and in integral relationship with MD5002 Media Skills and Practice 2.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The module offers a sequence of three intensive programmes or ‘mini-blocks’ tailored to the interests of specific groups of students. It provides a range of studies that address the character and conditions of cultural production including how they operate in practice. The module helps to prepare the student for their final-year dissertation and their future role as professionals and practitioners. The student encounters different perspectives on their subject area and undertakes different forms of coursework aimed at helping inform their choice of dissertation topic and approach.

    The module begins to situate the student within the process of constructing knowledge. This process may be approached from the point of view of the producer or consumer, the critic or the professional, the academic or the practitioner, in that there are a number of players involved. The module recognises that the student is also an active player in the process: what they bring to the construction of knowledge counts; and how effectively they construct it depends on how well they understand and interact with the field. To this end the module encourages the skills of reading and literacy as required – historical, analytical, textual, visual or technical – to help support rigorous and enterprising thought.

    The three blocks have equally weighted single assessments.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module develops students’ critical abilities in the analysis of film & television forms and texts, the cir-cumstances of their financing, production, distribution and exhibition in the economy and society. It encourages students to apply what they have learned from this analysis. It also develops the ability of the student to critically evaluate the film and television labour market.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This module develops the skills, tools and methods for future practice as an animator, filmmaker or music technologist. Further, students will be encouraged to experiment and to refine their choices of techniques and tools for different purposes.

    Students learn through engagement in a series of practical projects designed to further develop relevant skills in the student’s chosen area of specialisation. At the end of this module the student will have completed a workbook that contains a portfolio of assignments and a narrative of the working practices they have engaged with. The workbook/portfolio is designed to be a window on the process of making work and will also doc-ument the student’s practice in MD5001 Creative Studio Practice 2.

    Central to the module will be an exploration and deeper understanding of the overlap between technology, creativity and self-reflective critical practice. Further, the module engages the student in thinking about their developing practice and the contexts that frame and are changed by their work. This activity will be informed by the learning from the CCS module at level 5.

    This module is taught alongside and in integral relationship with MD5001 Creative Studio Practice 2. In addi-tion, the module extends the four areas of skills-development that were introduced at level 4 and run throughout the course. These are the career dossier, career plan, show reel, and exhibition.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module is framed in terms of a dissertation. The student undertakes an enquiry into a topic of his or her own choice and, based on this enquiry, develops an extended critical study. The module involves individual supervision designed to support the student’s ambitions and confidence in becoming an independent learner, building on techniques and knowledge developed in previous years, and providing scope for initiative and development. The dissertation demonstrates the student’s ability to thoroughly research a topic, use appropriate methods of investigation, and work methodically and productively.

    The subject matter of the dissertation can be theoretical, technical, or historical, should be closely related to the student’s main field of study and be complimentary to their practice. It may be envisaged as one of several different types: for example, visual, technical or other non-written material may form the subject of the enquiry and comprise an integral part of the whole; the dissertation may be professionally oriented and include field-work; or it might be academic and theoretical in its source material and methodology. Its form and approach can reflect a broad range of discipline-specific approaches based on discussion and agreement with the supervisor and/or course leader.

    Students may develop their topic independently or, as an option, within a specific dissertation Interest or Subject Group. Interest or Subject Groups will provide a short taught programme. They are offered on an annual basis and may incorporate:

    • research based specialisms
    • areas of scholarly interest in history and theory
    • industry related practice
    • workshop, digital or media based technical studies

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module represents core self-development activities that have been present throughout the AAD Media and Music courses: career and exhibition planning, promotion of student work, portfolio and possible work placement. Wherever possible, the student will obtain a suitable work placement.
    Student research will inform the development of a career plan and the design of the portfolio of work (including show reel where relevant). Students will design the presentation of their work to prospective employers or funders in various formats including: CV, covering letter, website – format to be determined through the student’s research. The module is also where students design the graduation show and other forms of exhibition through the year where relevant.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module is studied alongside its companion module Project Development Workbook, towards the Major Studio Project.

    MD6002 Major Studio Project permits honours-level students the opportunity to conceive, plan and produce a major, summative piece of work that brings together learning and serves as a graduation piece and the heart of their graduate portfolio. Utilising the capacity of this and MD6001, the project will be a high standard yet also leave room for experimentation, enhancing skills, and for the student to define and make their mark.

    At this level, the student is expected to originate his or her own project proposal, plan of works and brief, towards realisation of a major studio project, developed from a project proposal originated in the companion module MD6001 Project Development Workbook. The major project will be a labour of love yet the student will also be aware of the market for their work and other cultural contexts.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The purpose of this module is to permit intellectual and practical development, to a graduate level, of the skills, tools and methods of a professional-standard animator, filmmaker or music technologist in order to undertake and realise a major studio project in the parallel module MD6002 Major Studio Project. Working independently, under supervisory guidance, students will be encouraged to experiment, and question taken-for-granted ways of seeing and making and to think critically about the audience.

    At the end of this module and in parallel with the conception, planning, production and realisation of the Major Studio Project, the student will have completed a workbook/portfolio that contains a project proposal and plan of works and critical narrative account of the working practices they have engaged with. In this, as befitting honours level, students are also expected to document their research practice in a self-reflexive manner. The workbook/portfolio is intended to be a window on the process of making work and will also document the student’s practice.

    Central to the module is a deep understanding of the student’s creative and critical practice in relation to future employment, self-employment and other cultural contexts. Knowledge of these contexts will be
    gathered during the course at levels 4 and 5. This knowledge will be used to inform choices and decisions, quality and mode of presentation.

    This module is taught along side and cumulatively, in permeable relationship with MD6002 Major Studio
    Project.

    Read full details.

The BA (Hons) Film and Broadcast Production is a specialist, single honours programme.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits. During the first level, you’ll develop basic technical skills, make a series of films and study modules including scriptwriting and production management. In the second level, you’ll develop your technical skills in cinematography and editing and study modules on a wide range of subjects – from media theory to drama production. In the final level, you’ll utilise the skills you’ve developed on major projects in pre-production and production, as well as an in-depth research project.

Year 1 modules include:

  • Basic technical skills in camera and post–production: you will make a series of films for screening
  • Scriptwriting
  • Production management
  • Visual design for the screen
  • Media and film theory

Year 2 modules include:

  • Intermediate technical skills in cinematography and editing
  • Drama production: you will make a series of films for screening
  • Media theory and film studies
  • Professional media roles and industry structures

Year 3 modules include:

  • Major Project: Pre-production
  • Marketing and self-promotion including social media and festival strategies
  • Major project: Production – this can be an ambitious short film made collaboratively or individually, a series of shorter films made for clients or working on a longer film project for screening at the Summer Show, on your own website and at the National Film Theatre.
  • Major research project

You could follow in the footsteps of past graduates and move into media-related professions, including technical roles in media production, research, journalism, marketing, PR, film festival organisation and programming. You could also work freelance, set up your own compay or go onto further postgraduate study at masters or PhD level.

Graduates in the recent past have found work at companies such as Channel 4, CNBC and Sky as Assistant Directors, Directors of Photography, Runners, Assistant Producers, Media Planners, Researchers and Location Managers.

Others have continued making short films with the aim of becoming feature film directors. In 2014 two of our graduates released their first feature films as Directors. One has recently won a BAFTA as a rising British film industry star.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2016 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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