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Theatre and Film - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

The Theatre and Film BA merges cinematic and performance languages, explored through practice and theory. Develop the skills required for successful employment opportunities within the international film and television industries, and within theatre and performing arts.

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London is an undisputed global hub for the creative industries, theatre and film in particular. This course combines practical and theoretical approaches to explore this area and, where possible, capitalises on our London location to help you to directly engage with prospective employers. London Met’s theatre and film and related courses enjoy world-class collaborations with internationally acclaimed organisations such as Complicite, Project Phakama, The Heritage Arts Company and the British Film Institute. Our graduates have won awards in film festivals including Cannes, starred in BBC and CBS series, formed acclaimed theatre and film production companies across the globe, featured in long-running West End shows and worked successfully in all aspects of the theatre, film and television industries.

Studying this course, you’ll build a versatile approach, responding to the increasingly changeable nature of the theatre and film industries. You’ll develop skills in performing, writing for stage and screen, directing, producing and critically engaging with the language of cinema and live performance.

Assessment

Assessment on this course is both practical and written. It includes live presentations, video and multimedia projects, essays and portfolios.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum grade C in three A levels or minimum grades BC in at least two A levels (or a minimum of 96 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

Mature students with previous relevant experience are encouraged to apply.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Students are required to attend an interview workshop as part of the application process. Skype interviews can be arranged for those living outside of the UK.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday afternoon

    Module Code:
    Module Title: Approaches to Film and Television
    Description: This module investigates key approaches to the study of film as an academic discipline.
    It will introduce students to a broad range of theories, encompassing such topics as authorship, genre theory, star studies, historical poetics, film style, theories of spectatorship and psychoanalysis, feminist film theory, developments in audience studies and cultural studies. The module will examine a variety of theoretical approaches to film In addition, the module addresses issues of film style, enabling students to develop skills of textual analysis.
    Teaching Period: Year Long (30 weeks)
    Assessment: Textual analysis in-class test (20%), Evaluation (30%), Essay (50%)

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module offers a practical and theoretical exploration of the languages of theatre and film, seen side by side. Focusing on a range of themes, such as characterisation, performance, setting, narrative, text, visual and sound effects, the conventions of cinematic and live experiences will be closely compared and reflected upon. Students will engage in practical tasks exploring live performance ideas and alternating these with simple filming and viewing experiences. These will be informed by a range of theoretical perspectives, looking at historical practices as well as aesthetic and semiotic concepts in this comparative study.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This year long module will explore the shifting concept of Identity and its relationship to the context of Performance. On the one hand, it will explore how Identity is 'performed', in its everyday cultural constructions and representations; on the other, it will analyse how such a concept has in itself represented a key stimulus in contemporary and historical performance practices. The module is intended to provide students with an introductory range of critical and creative strategies, which is to inform their development across the whole BA Theatre Practice programme.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module introduces students to a range of photographic and digital video and sound practices, through a variety of practical exercises. This will provide them with a range of potentially employable skills. Through this practical engagement with digital video and photographic technologies, students will also reach a greater understanding of a number of theories and histories relating to photography and to the moving image and sound.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    Extending the range of ideas previously explored in Comparing Theatre and Performance, this module will look at ways in which the languages of live performance and film may be combined in interdisciplinary practice. Through creative projects and references to contemporary practice in multimedia art and entertainment (e.g. Complicite, Secret Cinema, Punchdrunk etc.), the module will provide a range of opportunities to appreciate how the fusion of theatre and cinema may be used to engage the public in immersive and innovative experiences.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module will enable students to explore a range of film and television moving image texts through practical exercises, experimentation, observation, analysis and documentation. Focusing on a series of key texts, through screenings, lectures, workshops and seminars, students will gain an enhanced understanding of how the key construction aspects – production development, cinematography, design, performance, sound, television studio work, editing, post-production and effects – shape a work’s narrative, language, genre, ideology, construction of reality, appearance and reception contexts.

    Equally, this module will engage with a range of aspects of television production, providing the opportunity for students to experience television studio operation. This will include opportunities to assume specialised operational and technical roles required in ‘live’ television and gallery production, such as director, floor manager and camera operator. The module also takes account of freelance operating models and emerging technology. This practice-led work will be underpinned by a carefully critical approach to television conventions and analyses of television products, in order to extend students' theoretical knowledge. Students will be encouraged to work as self-motivated reflective practitioners, operating effectively within the team to produce a live television programme.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Representation and Identity

    The module will investigate the representation of a range of identities in film and television, made both in the mainstream and at the margins. The module examines representations of race, femininity, masculinity and sexuality in film and popular culture, comparing and contrasting representations from various periods and cultures.The students will be introduced to theoretical approaches to analysing the representation of identity in film and visual culture, including cultural, post-colonial, feminist and queer theories.

    In the final three weeks of teaching, students will take stock of their learning at levels 4 and 5 via a period of workshops, study visits and independent research culminating in the submission of their project plan for level 6, which includes a reflective element related to their personal development planning.

    This module is taught over 30 weeks using a blended learning delivery. The assessment comprises two essays (30% and 40% respectively), a summary of online comments (20%) and a project plan (10%).

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Developing from the knowledge and awarenesses promoted in Identity & Performance, this module will investigate social issues that are both enacted and questioned by established performance practices.
    A key emphasis here is on social inter-actions from a performance perspective. In this sense, social interactions are explored in the communication strategies between performance and audience, in the social function of performative languages, in the political and ideological context depicted in performance or embedded in its creation, in the function of performance with respect to marginality and inclusion, and in the sociological study of performance institutions and their organisation within the professional industry.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module considers contemporary American television in relation to industry shifts, stylistic innovation and its representation of American culture, society and politics. Studies will examine studios such as HBO and a variety of comedies and dramas as case studies of industrial issues and cultural representations.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module functions as an introduction to skills and concepts behind directing both in theory and practice. Students will study key directing practitioners. They will be introduced to the role and function of the director, focusing on the relationship with the performer. They will study and apply basic directing techniques and explore and analyse the directorial process. Much of the work will be text based, using a set text as a starting point.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    Dramaturgy is a semester long module designed to examine and explore the complicated role of the dramaturg. Through the module there will be an attempt to define, analyse and the practice dramaturgy with regard to a wide range of theatre practices (including dance theatre, installation and site responsive work). The role of dramaturg will be considered in an International context as an individual who builds bridges: between theory and practice; between the director, the performers and the text/script, choreographer/playwright; between artistic intention and the realities of budget; between a theatre, its productions and the audience.

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  • This module will examine the ways in which philosophy can enrich our experience of films and contribute to their analysis; and conversely to what extent films can actively participate in the exploration and understanding of philosophical problems. The module will, therefore, provide a good introduction to some of the basic problems that have exercised philosophers in modern times, such as scepticism about the existence of the external world and other minds, the problem of free will, and the nature of personal identity. It will ask whether the advent of cinema as a new medium of communication altered some of the underlying preconceptions that have shaped these debates. By examining specific films from a variety of genres the module will explore the various ways in which film can cinematically present philosophical ideas, and will pursue the question of whether there is a specifically cinematic mode of doing philosophy.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    This module will explore creative strategies in the application of the concepts of performativity and performance-as-research, beyond a strictly theatrical context. In doing so, it will promote multi-disciplinary crossovers, in particular between performance, visual and multimedia arts. A particular focus will be dedicated to the conceptual investigation of site and the creative adaptation and transformation of this.

    The function and aesthetics of performance and site will be explored in their broadest significance, making use of concepts such as rituality, liminality, hybridity and contamination and relevant theoretical references in this respect. Studying the work of contemporary and historical practices in installation, site-specific and site-responsive art, students will develop new work to be presented and contextualised as part of a self-curated event. Such an event may be organised in collaboration with professional structures, both inside the University (e.g. The Facility: Centre for Creative Practice at London Met) and outside (galleries, art centres and collaborating practitioners). In this sense, the module will represent an opportunity to gain professional skills both in the artistic and academic development of new work, as well as in the documentation and dissemination of this.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module aims to offer students an insight into the practical marketing of theatre arts in addition to developing their professional and employment related skills. It will introduce students to the project skills required for marketing an arts event which they will then hone and develop through the research, creation and realisation of their own performance brand. This activity may interrelate with their performance-making work on other parts of the Theatre Practices degree.

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  • This module provides students with the opportunity to obtain academic credit (15 credits at Level 5) for learning gained through prior or concurrent experience in service-learning activities and employment, which demonstrably contributes towards their portfolio of employable skills, particularly in the area of media work in general. This might include volunteering, peer mentoring or peer assistance, service to community activities, work-based learning gained through student employment initiatives in the University, or generic workplace learning such as part-time or vacation employment. Students must demonstrate how they have developed high-level transferable and career management skills through such activity, or how it has demonstrably contributed towards their engagement with the discipline of Film and Television Studies. The module enables them to articulate these benefits, in order to achieve their career or continuing study goals.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module provides an opportunity to study across text, performance and creative writing. Students will study the formal characteristics of screenplays and the political, social and philosophical concerns of the societies in which they have developed. This will be combined with a study of film performance and production where students will examine how writing and performance intersect, inform, and inspire each other. Students will develop specialist skills both in the critical and theoretical analysis of films and screenplays, and in creative writing of scripts for screen.

    This module will be delivered in combination with the 30 credit, Level 5, Scripting Performance for Screen and Stage module.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The module explores ideas around stardom and performance, considering their significance in relation to notions of identity, cultural context, filmic narrative and audience reception. A number of case studies will be examined as the module explores shifting ideas of stardom across both eras and screen media.

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    Engagement and Participation is a an Autumn Semester module introducing and exploring theatre and drama within a community context. This module is designed to facilitate the students’ progress from theatre student to theatre practitioner. The module with initially engage with a syllabus covering all aspects of workshop leading and workshop design, it will then progress to cover the emergent industry agenda of immersion and widening participation in the theatrical arts. The module will address the academic stimuli of drama as a teaching medium and address the concerns and practical implications of professional/client group communication. This element of the module will culminate in a work placement where skills and learning can be translated into experience and practice in workshop leading. The second half of the module will cover the engagement of non-traditional theatrical events which seek to extend the definition of theatre practice. This will result in experimental activity which will place the work within a community setting with a social conscience and a political agenda.

    The students will benefit for the university’s links to professional theatrical groups and bodies such as Graeae, Islington Shed, Phakama, Clean Break, International Rainbows, Lewisham Youth Theatre, various schools and colleges. There will also be opportunities for forging new links and collaborating with diverse and various community groups within the current professional movement towards extending engagement and participation beyond the ‘traditional’ boundaries of contemporary theatrical practice.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    This module explores issues of reception and interpretation within the field of film studies both in historical and theoretical terms. Using a variety of case-studies, the module explores the historical and theoretical issues that inform and structure film reception and interpretation, the interaction between text and context and the formation of film canons.

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  • This module allows students to explore in depth a theory or theory/practice topic of their own choice, arising out of their study at levels 4 and 5 (subject to supervisor approval). Their individual study is facilitated by a tutor assigned to the project according to subject specialism.

    This module is mainly self-managed by the student with facilitation by a specialist in the chosen subject. Students’ individual work is supported by regular consultation and feedback from their tutor and peer-led workshops.

    The project incorporates both formative and summative assessment. Students will present their project plan orally in a subject specific workshop and in written form to their project supervisor. The summative assessment consists of the actual project, either a written project or a film and/or performance project with outline, treatment and theoretical statement (90%) and the project management (10%).

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module charts the development of the French New Wave, a group of films of the late 1950s and 1960s and one of the most influential movements in film history.
    The work of a new generation of directors many of whom had started as film critics, the module will consider this distinctive film style in the context of the social changes that transformed post-war French society and culture.
    In tandem with the rise of cinephilia and the love of American cinema, the module will trace the passage from theory into practice. The textual properties of the films and their artistic innovations will be explored in connection with the representation of youth, modernity, the city of Paris, history and gender relations.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    This is a 15-week module for Level 6 students, which aims to provide practical, theoretical and contextual understanding of choreographed theatre and performance work. In studio-based seminar workshops students will engage with a range of theatre and dance movement basedapproaches and applications for choreographing performance related to professional environments and their own ideas.

    Students will work towards the creating their own choreography that will be directed into a public presentation by the module leader. Critical appraisal and analysis of this performance experiment will follow and lead to an evaluative essaythat will inform the summative performance of the students’ work as a collaborative performance exercise for final presentation.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    Directing 2 is a 15 credit module that develops the skills and concepts learnt in Directing 1 - a pre-requisite for this module. It allows students the opportunity to explore their own directorial vision and apply skills learnt in practice. In this case directing refers to text based work. The practical work is placed within the context of critical theory, as previously explored in Identity and Performance and Society and Performance.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    This module investigates theories of realism and representation in relation to documentary, whether made for cinema or television. The student will explore the production of meaning across a range of documentary genres. Conventions of realism will be analysed in relation to changing industrial, technological and cultural contexts. Students will work in small groups to produce a short documentary through which to advance their filmmaking skills, and to engage with the challenge of representation in our culturally diverse communities.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module aims to contextualise the content of the Theatre Practice degree towards professional application by introducing the fundamentals of business practice as applied to the leading of performance-based projects. During the module students will be introduced to planning strategies, financial management and fundraising and business models towards the creation of a project plan. The module addresses the social entrepreneurship movement and embraces technology in these business practices and has an emphasis on collaborative learning.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module examines the Hollywood film musical, its historical development and its relationship to American culture and identity. Films will be explored in relation to a variety of generic, structural, stylistic and thematic issues.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    This module will develop further students’ understanding of and practice in screenwriting. The module will focus particularly on how both television writing and a range of film texts might differ from accepted conventions of writing for the screen. Students will be introduced to a range of texts and approaches which develop their understanding of both the specifics of writing for television and alternative approaches to writing for film. Students will produce their own treatment and script showing the influence of one or more of the approaches discussed.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module is intended to develop skills in writing for theatre and performance and to consider the ways in which texts shift, enlarge, contract and transform once they are performed. It will combine analysis of existing written and performed texts with creative writing exercises to develop informed, critical, creative writers. Students will also view theatre and performance in London and consider the relationship between the text-as-written and the text-as-performance. The work will be firmly embedded in the contemporary theatre industry – drawing on links with new writing/live art venues in London. Students will develop a portfolio of work and a completed short script. This module will make links with Identity and Performance, Society and Performance and where possible Dramaturgy.

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A wide range of modules will be offered, allowing you to combine the areas of film and theatre or specialise in one of these.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

Year 1 (Level 4) modules include:

  • Approaches to Film and TV  
  • Moving Image Practice
  • Identity and Performance
  • Objects and Theatre
  • Combining Theatre and Film 1

Year 2 (Level 5) modules include:

  • Exploring Film, TV and Digital Media practice
  • Combining Theatre and Film 2 
  • Representation and Identity (Film)
  • Society in Performance
  • Scripting Performance for Screen
  • Contemporary American Television
  • Directing 1
  • Installation and Site
  • Recognition of Work
  • Film and Philosophy
  • Producing 1
  • Dramaturgy
  • Stardom and Performance

Year 3 (Level 6) modules include:

  • Project or dissertation
  • Film Reception and Interpretation
  • Engagement and Participation
  • Constructing Reality in Film and Television
  • Artists' Film and Video
  • Movement for Theatre
  • Directing 2
  • From Page to Performance: Stage and Screen
  • The Hollywood Musical
  • Producing 2

This course focuses on producing versatile theatre and film professionals. Our graduates have been successful in the following areas: performing, writing, directing, producing, forming production companies, broadcasting, working on education and outreach programmes, and working in the broader cultural industries. Graduates have also continued with postgraduate study in the arts and culture.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of- the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

UK/EU applicants for September full-time entry must apply via UCAS unless specified otherwise.

Applicants for September part-time entry should apply direct to the University using the online application.

Non-UK and EU applicants for September entry may apply via UCAS, but may also apply directly to the University via the apply online button.

Applicants will be invited to a workshop/interview, or alternatively to an interview on Skype (international applicants).

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accept applications for full-time courses starting in September one year before the start of the course.

Our UCAS institution code is L68.

Visit UCAS for more details.

Fees and key information

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