Dr Karen McNally


Karen McNally  

Dr McNally is a senior lecturer and course leader for BA (Hons) Film and Television Studies. She holds a PhD in Film Studies and a MA in Film Studies (Distinction) from the University of Nottingham, as well as a BA Film and Television Studies/American Studies (First Class Honours) from Brunel University.

Karen is a specialist in classical Hollywood cinema and post-war American culture. Her monograph on Frank Sinatra, When Frankie Went to Hollywood, has been described as "fascinating… vital and engrossing", and her volume of essays, Billy Wilder, Movie-Maker, was reviewed as "an exceptionally valuable undertaking". Her articles and book chapters have been published in a variety of international sources. Karen’s research focuses on issues of stardom, gender, race and genre in classical Hollywood. She is currently part of an international research project based at the University of Paris exploring the American film musical and is working on a book project on colour film noir. Karen has appeared in documentaries on Channel 4 and BBC Radio in relation to her research.

Current teaching

  • Introduction to American Film and Television
  • Stardom and Performance
  • The Hollywood Musical
  • Screening America in Hollywood Film

Karen welcomes applications for doctoral supervision on research topics relating to classical Hollywood cinema, musicals, stardom, post-war gender and race and contemporary representations of post-war America, including Mad Men.

Books

  • When Frankie Went to Hollywood: Frank Sinatra and American Male Identity (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008).
  • Billy Wilder, Movie-Maker: Critical Essays on the Films (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011).

Book chapters

  • Beyond the Performance: Ida Lupino and the American Business of Show in Phillip Sipiora (ed), The Films of Ida Lupino (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, forthcoming 2017).
  • Damaged Beauty: Montgomery Clift, tragedy and the redefinition of a star image in Kate Egan and Sarah Thomas (eds.), Cult Film Stardom: Offbeat Attractions and Processes of Cultification (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).
  • "Have they forgotten what a star looks like?": Image and Theme with Dino, Cagney and Fedora in Karen McNally (ed.), Billy Wilder, Movie-Maker: Critical Essays on the Films (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011).
  • Sailors and Kissing Bandits: The Challenging Spectacle of Frank Sinatra at MGM in Steven Cohan (ed), The Sound of Musicals (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

Articles

  • Sinatra’s films shattered the postwar myth of the white American maleThe Conversation US, December 11, 2015.
  • Hollywood Stars vs Variety Show Hosts: The Incompatible Case of Frank Sinatra on 1950s TelevisionEuropean Journal of American Culture 31:2 (July 2012), pages 107-121.
  • The Geordie and the American Hero: Revisiting Classic Hollywood Masculinity in When the Boat Comes In’, Journal of British Cinema and Television (May 2007).
  • "Where’s the spinning wheel?": Frank Sinatra and Working-Class Alienation in Young at HeartJournal of American Studies, 41 (2007).
  • “Sinatra, Commie Playboy”: Frank Sinatra, Post-War Liberalism and Press Paranoia, Film Studies, Hollywood Blacklist Special Issue co-edited by Steve Neale and Peter Stanfield, Issue 7 (Winter) 2005.
  • “Your blood’s the same as mine”: The House I Live In and the Post-War Push for Tolerance, Film & History CD-ROM Annual (May 2005).
  • Films for Swingin’ Lovers: Frank Sinatra, Performance and Sexual Objectification in The Tender Trap and Pal JoeyScope: An Online Journal of Film Studies, May 2002.
  • When Frankie Went to Hollywood: Frank Sinatra and American Male Identity (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2008).
  • Billy Wilder, Movie-Maker: Critical Essays on the Films (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2011).