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Criminology, Policing and Law Extended Degree (including Foundation Year) - BSc (Hons)

Why study this course?

If you want a career addressing the causes of crime but don’t have the necessary qualifications or entry requirements for an undergraduate course, this course includes a foundation year that, if passed successfully, allows you to continue on to an criminology-related degree. During the foundation year you’ll study modules which will help you to improve your critical thinking, essay writing and academic skills, as well as giving you an introduction to some of the themes involved in the this field. This will enable you to continue on to study the subject you are most interested in, such as criminology combined with policing, law, youth studies, international security, sociology or psychology.

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The Criminology, Policing and Law Extended Degree (including Foundation Year) BSc is set up to help you enter your desired criminology-related undergraduate course even if you don't have the necessary qualifications. By teaching you the fundamentals of undergraduate study in the social sciences and humanities, this degree gives you the chance to continue onto the subject you really want to learn.

The foundation year focuses on improving your academic and study skills, boosting your confidence and unlocking your potential for higher education. Classes in critical thinking encourage you to challenge preconceived notions and generate your own ideas, while essay writing practices train you in the best way to communicate them.

Successfully pass the foundation year and you can confidently move on to study an undergraduate course such as criminology or combine it with sociology, psychology, youth studies, law, policing and international security.

Depending on what you go on to study, you could be learning under staff with professional experience as probation officials, Chief Inspectors, Detective Sergeants, leading criminal researchers and more. Their professional experience combined with academic teaching ability means you’ll be learning from people who can back up your academic study with real world insights.

London Met criminology highlights can include work opportunities in mentoring and charity placements, access to our mock courtroom and regular talks by visiting experts. You can learn more about the staff, students and subject area news at our criminology hub.

Whichever course you choose and whoever you study under, this extended degree is perfect if you want help getting into a career where you can make a difference to contemporary society.

Assessment

Your assessment will be split between coursework and exams. Coursework types include portfolios of reflective writing, digital portfolios, essays, reports, presentations, discussion and seminar skills. This range ensures you’ll start the undergraduate course with the skills required.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • at least one A level (or a minimum of 40 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Subsidiary/National/BTEC Extended Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you are a mature student with significant work experience, you are invited to apply for this course on the basis of the knowledge and skills you have developed through your work.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester

    This module provides a theoretical and practical introduction to the analysis, evaluation and production of argument. It will introduce students to the process of developing and supporting ideas and beliefs by evaluating how others do this and by supporting them going through the process themselves. The module will explore the importance of different points of view and the complexity that surrounds many issues. It will provide opportunities for students to relate their understanding of critical thinking and their reasoning skills to academic practices in general and, more specifically, to their pathway studies.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester afternoon
    • summer studies afternoon
    • summer studies morning
    • spring semester morning

    This module provides an introduction to the social sciences, through examining a few key sociological theories, approaches and concepts. Themes may include the influence of power on us as citizens, the individual within society and the role of family. We will examine the theories in historical, cross-cultural and contemporary contexts through the use of a core text “Dead White Men and Other Important people”. By using this narrative approach we aim to help students develop reflective skills and practice basic application of theory. The interaction between different themes and ideas and how these may affect our students’ lives will be explored through the module. The module will also develop reading, independent study, revision and exam writing skills

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester

    This module provides an introduction to media, crime and deviance and ‘race’ and racism.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester
    • spring semester

    This module introduces students to the academic skills required for undergraduate study in the Social Sciences and Humanities.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester
    • spring semester

    Students will acquire research skills through a guided research project. They will use these as a basis for producing a short report.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester afternoon
    • summer studies afternoon
    • spring semester morning
    • summer studies morning

    Students will be introduced to various key areas of current research within the area of social sciences and humanities. They will analyse this research, undertake further research and this will inform their research proposal. They will give an oral presentation based on their area of research interest.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • summer studies afternoon
    • spring semester afternoon
    • spring semester morning
    • summer studies morning

    This module develops students’ academic skills for the effective planning and production of an essay in the Social Sciences and Humanities.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • summer studies morning
    • spring semester morning

    This module aims to encourage students to examine a variety of economic, industrial, social and political issues that shape the experience of living in a global city. Weekly workshops, lectures and seminars will offer different dimensions of the variety of ways in which London offers contrasting experiences, competing interests or contested spaces, and these issues will be investigated further in seminar/workshops.

    This will be the first time students at level 3 attend formal lectures and seminars and they will be practising and developing key undergraduate study skills such as, note-taking, extended listening skills, pre and post lecture reading activities and reflective writing activities and understanding the etiquette of lectures.

    They will be asked in seminars to discuss issues raised in the lectures, and to engage in online activities and try out digital tools to help develop their digital learning skills. The assessment for this module will be for students to write reflectively in series of online activities and build up a digital journal on Weblearn. Success in this module depends upon regular attendance and active participation.

    Read full details.

The first year of this extended degree course involves studying a range of topics and will allow you to gain a taste of the degree subject you aim to progress onto at Year 1 (level 4).

Year 0 (Level 3) modules include:

  • • Culture, Family and Power
    • Critical Thinking
    • Media, Crime and Race
    • Reflecting on Self and Society
    • Researching Discrimination
    • Researching Inequality
    • Social Issues in Context: Text to Essay
    • Studying London

Modules at Year 1, 2 and 3 (levels 4, 5 and 6) are determined by the path you choose following the completion of level 3 and other necessary maths and English qualifications. Pathway option include:

"[The foundation year] "helped me to know my strength and weakness and prepare me for my degree course. I can now tackle issues that i would have struggled with if I had gone straight to a degree course. My communication, organisation and reading skills have all improved. At first it was challenging, but as i progressed through the course I was able to face some of my challenges and overcome them with the help all of my lectures."
Course leader survey

"The course has prepared me very well for my degree and I am more confident now than ever. Also, the lecturers were great—they take their time to explain and clarify things for us and eventually we gain a better understanding.”
Course leader survey

“The diverse background of the teaching staff has given me a more eye-opening learning experience, particularly in the Policing module. The first hand professional experience of the lecturers and tutors makes the theories and ideas we learn far more interesting to relate to. Our lecturers and tutors also offered valuable advice about the careers and paths open to us after graduation.”
National Student Survey

Graduates from our criminology related courses enter a range of careers including as Police Officer, Special Constable, Investigating Analyst,  Support Worker, Senior Detective Constable, Investigating Analyst and Probation Officer. They now work for organisations as diverse as the Metropolitan Police,  Ten Intelligence, Mears,  the Finnish Police and the London Community Rehabilitation Company.

There's also the opportunity of postgraduate study at London Met, which will allow you to gain more links with police forces thanks to the important research culture in units like our John Grieve Centre.

Extended degrees provide applicants with an alternative route into higher education. If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for an undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing an extended degree. Extended degrees include a Year 0, which is also known as a foundation year. Once you successfully complete your first year of study you will progress into Year 1 of an undergraduate degree.

Many of our students benefit from fee reductions, bursaries or scholarships.

If you're planning to study an extended degree at London Met, you may be eligible for bursaries totalling between £1,000 and £5,000 across four years of study, and up to a total of £9,500 across four years of study if you are a care leaver.

Please check the details of our bursaries for extended degrees to see if you might be eligible.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Applying for September 2017

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2017 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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