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Psychology and Sociology - BSc (Hons)

Why study this course?

This vocational course combines the insights of psychology with those of sociology, enabling you to better understand human behaviour and the different genetic, biological, individual, social and developmental factors that can influence it. You’ll have the opportunity to specialise in areas of interest, such as ethnicity, youth and workplace psychology. In the most recent (2015-16) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

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This joint degree allows you to look at human behaviour from two different perspectives. Psychology integrates theory and evidence-based knowledge from different areas, including genetics, biology, individuality and development. Sociology looks at contemporary social issues, practical sociological research and social relations.

Over the course of this degree you’ll develop your understanding of both disciplines and gain the essential research and analytical skills required in both. You’ll look at humans as individuals and as communities, and will explore issues that are becoming increasingly relevant in society today, such as global inequality, gender and sexuality, and religion and the state.

You’ll have the opportunity to undertake a work placement in your third year, giving you the chance to gain valuable, hands-on experience. You’ll also complete a psychology and sociology dissertation on a topic of your choosing.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through essays, critical reviews, multiple choice tests, examinations, experimental reports and presentations. 

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BCC in three A levels or minimum grades BC in at least two A levels in academic or business subjects (or a minimum of 104 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma; or Advanced Diploma; or Progression Diploma; or Access to HE Diploma with 60 credits)
  • GCSE English and Mathematics at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

Entry from appropriate foundation and access courses will also be considered.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Specific qualifications that may make you eligible for advanced entry to this course include a relevant foundation Degree, HND or equivalent.

 

 

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module focuses on various aspects of thought (“cognition”) and behaviour, and how these develop through the lifespan. Lecture topics will include the historical development of ideas in cognitive and developmental psychology. They will also look at topics in Cognitive Psychology including perception, attention and memory and in Developmental Psychology, topics including research methods, development of the self (including gender development and attachment), and social & cultural influences on development.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module introduces students to some key theories and models of personality as explanations for individual behaviour, along with social psychological theories, which seek to understand behaviour in a wider social context.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday afternoon

    To examine how social problems become conceived as such by the media, government and civil society and to analyse the impact of particular social problems on society. We shall also reflect on the location of particular social problems in different spaces: global, regional, national, local and examine policy responses to particular social problems

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module will provide students with an introduction to the discipline of Sociology and some of the basic skills of identifying, applying and evaluating sociological approaches, concepts and debates to everyday situations. It will also provide an introduction to constructing sociological arguments, thinking critically and assessing sociological evidence.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module extends and develops students’ knowledge of personality and individual differences to include psychometrics, intelligence, personality disorders and mental illness, motivation and emotion, and further examines social behaviour in terms of how individuals think about and seek to understand their social world and interact with others at group and societal level.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The principal focus of this module is for students to build on prior understanding and learning, exploring philosophical accounts of scientific explanation and the theory and practice of sociological research through the use of work-related interactive methods. The module provides work experience for students by developing research for a real world organisation (employer). Students will learn about doing research methods by conducting research for an employer. The employer will contribute to setting out small-scale research aims and objectives; being available to assess student proposals and bids or assess the analysis/ final presentation. The first part of this module examines the theory and philosophical accounts of research methodology, as well as introducing students to the practical skills of doing interviews, transcribing them, and analysing qualitative data. The second part of the module concentrates on quantitative methods, and requires students to design research for the requirements of an employer involved in both the aims and outcomes (assessment) of the research. The module provides work-related understanding and application of research methods by involving employer requirements and needs.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module introduces students to some of the key sociological approaches used to explore and explain the sociological notion of ‘self’. This will involve an examination of a range of major 20th century sociological thinkers on the nature of the social construction of self eg. Mead, Goffman. The intention is to use some of the major sociological theorists and apply their insights into current concerns with the ‘project’ of self and identity. That is, to examine how much choice we have in becoming who we are. The opportunity to ‘apply’ the sociological approaches to a range of issues/areas will engage a range of interests/students. The ‘project of the self’ in contemporary society will be used to explore this key sociological concept, drawing on recent developments in the sociology of emotions, religion, and deviancy.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This module comprises of two major areas: Developmental psychology and Cognitive Psychology. In comparison to the first year combined module, it introduces the following new areas in depth. Each topic is covered by several lectures: Life-span development, Theories about development, Language (incl. bilingualism and language disorders) and Reasoning/Decision making.

    In the first set of tutorials, students are instructed how to write a Review article and practice with sample articles.

    In the second set of tutorials, students learn to create a small reaction time/accuracy experiment using software, e.g. Superlab.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The module examines the impact of globalisation on inequalities in our current 21st century world. Evidence suggests that inequalities are increasing within many countries in the world as a consequence of globalisation and the module will examine these increasing and changing patterns of inequality. Growing urbanisation, rural-urban migration and the growth of poverty and slums in the global south and of social polarisation in cities in the global south and north are considered. The module examines changes in social class, gender and ethnic divisions and inequalities in our contemporary world. It looks at the growth of a new global elite, the growth of the middle class in many countries and cities throughout the world and at the growth of a precarious social class. The module looks at how globalisation has impacted gender inequalities with globalisation leading to the increasing participation of women in many countries and regions of the world.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The module explores theories and conceptions of racism and ethnicity, and the practices of racism in contemporary societies. The historical roots of racism will be examined and its contemporary forms studied comparatively. Racism is specifically explored within the context of social and political conflicts.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module looks at young people as social and political actors, and uses applied sociological theory to analyse current issues relating to youth in consumer society, the strategies of adaptation and resistance, violence and gangs, subcultures and political movements, and social control. The focus will be on the UK as well as European and global issues.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module will provide students with an opportunity to engage with contemporary thinkers and debates in social theory. They will be required to critically examine the ideas of contemporary social theorists and explore the application of their ideas to an ever-changing world. The module will explore what it means to be human and examine how different perspectives on this impact upon a range of issues, from state policies to the development of artificial intelligence. Overall, the aim of the module is to develop the students’ capacity to utilise theoretical ideas taken from philosophy and sociological theory by applying them to the social world.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity of studying a chosen area of psychology in depth. The project involves students researching and reviewing the literature for a chosen research question. The student is also required to present a critique of the chosen question along with future possibilities for research.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    The students carry out an in-depth piece of sociological research and analysis in an area of their choice. In the first half of this module students will learn about different aspects of writing a dissertation.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    The students identify and evaluate the theoretical and methodological issues involved in investigating a topic of their choice. They are encouraged and guided, through one-to-one supervision, to apply the conceptual understanding gained in their course of study to a substantive issue. The students design an in-depth piece of sociological research and analysis in an area of their choice. In the first half of this module students will learn about different aspects of writing a project.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This year long module focuses on the application of psychological theory and method to the promotion of health and treatment of physical and mental illness. Requires any 4 core level 4 and/or level 5 modules taken from the BSc Psychology programme. This module is assessed by two equally weighted case study reports.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module examines the relationship between cognition and emotion (thinking and feeling) beginning with early philosophical theories of emotion then considering the behaviourist theories of emotion and subsequently current psychological theories of emotion (especially cognitive theories of emotion). Separate theories of normal emotion and disordered emotions will be drawn together to introduce a theoretical framework applicable to both normal and disordered emotions.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module is an optional third year BSc psychology module running in the Autumn semester. This module introduces students to the discipline of counselling psychology as one of the main forms of applied psychological practice accredited by the British Psychological Society in the United Kingdom. The module will cover counselling psychology in theory, clinical practice and research. Through developing an understanding of this branch of applied psychology, BSc students will have an opportunity to assess whether further training towards the qualification of chartered counselling psychologist and future employment in this field might be an appropriate direction for them.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module is designed to provide students with a solid basis of knowledge and understanding of the application of psychology to explanations of criminal behaviour, and to the study of contemporary issues and processes in the criminal justice system.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    The module introduces students to the key concepts and theories relating to the social construction of gender and sexuality and their application to a range of social sectors and issues in the UK and abroad. The ways in which gender and sexuality are both constitutive of the social and are constituted through social structures, institutions and interactions are explored, as are the ways in which theories of gender and sexuality have informed the sociological study of the family, work, health, education, crime, the welfare state and politics, media and the body.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module builds on earlier studies of social problems, social inclusion and exclusion, and education policy. We will reflect further on the meaning of social inclusion and exclusion in society, and the specific meaning of the terms in education in relation to the world of education and students with special educational needs. The study of the role of education and schooling in relation to achieving inclusion in both arenas is the focus of this module.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    Educational environments interact with individuals’ unique genetic profiles and neurobiology, leading to wide individual differences in learning ability, motivation, and achievement. The module will provide new insights into the origins of individual differences in education traits such as cognitive abilities (e.g. IQ) and learning difficulties (e.g. dyslexia); motivation and personality; behavioural and emotional problems; social functioning and academic achievement. The module will also examine factors that influence both typical and atypical neurodevelopment (to the extent that those factors are linked to educational performance). Finally, the module will provide an overview of the learning deficits that individuals with learning disabilities (e.g. Specific Language Impairments disorder) experience.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    This module will provide students with an opportunity to engage with contemporary debates on the relationship between religion and the state. Students will be required to critically examine the ideas of the classic and contemporary social scientists on religion and explore the application of their ideas to an ever-changing world. Overall, the aim of the module is to develop the students’ capacity to utilise social scientific concepts and perspectives in their analyses of religion in contemporary society. The disciplinary focus of the module will, initially, be the sociology of religion. The application of a range of social scientific approach will also be introduced - historical, political, economic and social psychological approaches.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    This module develops students’ knowledge of social and cultural psychological concepts and theories with the focus on the application of psychological theory to a range of contemporary issues related to psychological phenomenon such as self and identity, prejudice and discrimination, social exclusion, and intergroup conflict and cooperation. It additionally introduces theory and research on the cultural specificity of psychological phenomena such as motivation, emotion, cognition, development, and psychological health and wellbeing.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module is designed to enable students to undertake a period of work-based learning, in relation to their course at level 6, within an appropriate organisation, and to gain credit for that learning. They will have the opportunity to apply, to test and to extend the knowledge that they have gained at all levels of the course. In so doing students will be able to enhance and extend their understanding of Sociology or Social Policy applied to the world of practice. The module will also afford them the opportunity to gain professional experience of an appropriate related work environment.

    Students will register with the module leaders including an initial consultation about priorities and preferences, plus attend a series of workshops. They will be briefed on the module, undergo induction and work related learning planning, preparing a work-based learning agreement to be agreed/approved between the student, academic supervisor and an employment setting representative, before they take up the opportunity. It is essential that students are made aware that both the work related learning agreement and relevant health and safety checklist (where applicable) need to be finalised and approved when starting the placement.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    This module will examine a range of topics from the field of applied work, business and relevant aspects of work psychology. Participants will be exposed to a range of academic disciplines/pillars that will make up the syllabus of this module. These pillars are Occupational Psychology and Business Psychology.

    Read full details.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits. As this is a joint degree, you'll study 60 credits for each subject at each level.

Year 1 modules include:

  • Cognitive and Developmental Psychology (1)
  • Individual Differences and Social Psychology (1)
  • Sociological Imagination
  • Social Problems and Social Issues

Year 2 modules include:

  • Individual Differences and Social Psychology (2)
  • Interactive Research Methods
  • Self and Society
  • Developmental Psychology and Cognition (2) (option)
  • Global Inequalities in the 21st Century (option)
  • Racism and Ethnicity (option)
  • Youth, Resistance and Social Control (option)

Year 3 modules include:

  • Living Theory
  • Psychology Joint Project
  • Psychology and Sociology Dissertation
  • Sociology Project
  • Clinical and Health Psychology (option)
  • Counselling Psychology (option)
  • Cultural and Social Psychology (option)
  • Forensic Psychology (option)
  • Gender and Sexuality (option)
  • Inclusion and Special Educational Needs (option)
  • Judgement and Decision Making (option)
  • Psychology of Learning and Education (option)
  • Religion and the State (option)
  • Sociology and Social Policy Work Placement (option)
  • Work Psychology (option)

This course opens up job opportunities in both the private and public sectors. Examples of our Sociology orientated graduates include those now working as Human Resources Officer at Clarins and Prison Custody Officer at Sodexo, while our Psychology inclined graduates have gone on to become Support Workers at Creative Support, Special Needs Teaching Assistant at Edustaff and more.

The skills you’ll develop are transferable across an even wider range of sectors, such as advertising, human resources and marketing. It’s also great preparation for postgraduate study.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Applying for September 2017

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2017 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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