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Law - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

This undergraduate degree will help you develop excellent employability skills and prepare you for a wide range of careers. Taught by legal experts in a busy department, you'll also benefit from extracurricular activities including presentations and events organised by the Mansfield Law Society and the Director of Clinical Legal Education. On graduation, you’ll have the knowledge and expertise you need for a career in politics, business, the voluntary sector, the civil service or as a paralegal, patent lawyer or licensed conveyancer.

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

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This is a popular course for anyone who wishes to study law but does not intend to be a solicitor or a barrister. The course is suitable for careers in politics, business, the voluntary sector, the civil service or for those wishing to be a paralegal, patent lawyer or licensed conveyancer.

Our staff are experts in their field and you’ll be part of one of the largest faculties of its kind in the UK, with numerous links to employers, professional bodies and international organisations.

Based in London, you’ll have easy access to the Central London Criminal Court and the Houses of Parliament. Our mock courtroom, complete with dock, witness box and public gallery, will familiarise you with the courtroom environment, explain the processes and aid your presentation skills. Thanks to these facilities, two of our legal students came an impressive 5th out of 64 universities in the ESU National Mooting Competition 2012.

We place great emphasis on employability with a dedicated legal careers advisor who organises a programme of events with guest speakers, networking events with other students and offers assistance in finding work placements and internships. To develop your skills, we also offer excellent opportunities to study in another European country for one semester in Amsterdam, Paris or Bologna.

Assessment

Methods of assessment include essays, examinations, presentations and research projects.

We do not assess entirely by exams and tests, unless required by professional bodies. We encourage teamwork to help you develop skills that will be needed in the workplace.

Professional accreditation

This is not a qualifying law degree for professional legal training. The Faculty offers LLB, LLB (Business Law) or LLB (with International Relations) which are qualifying law degrees.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • for entry in the 2016-17 academic year: at least 280 points, including at least two A levels or a Level 3 Advanced Diploma, or equivalent
  • for entry in the 2017-18 academic year: a minimum of grades BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • GCSE English at grade C (grade 4 from 20117) or above or Higher Diploma (or equivalent)

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Friday morning

    Contract Law is a thirty week module providing students with a thorough understanding of contract law. As well as studying the traditional principles of offer, acceptance, consideration and third party rights, students will also consider other such practical topics as remedies, misrepresentation, frustration, restitution and exclusion clauses in contract. The subject is essential for all business, commercial and consumer interests. Assessment is via a combination of coursework and seminar participation. The module is relevant and very important for a range of careers in law, commerce and industry.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday morning

    This module provides an academic introduction to fundamental rules of criminal law, including the principles of a range of criminal offences.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (January start) - Thursday morning

    This module focuses on developing skills of analysis, communication and reasoning. It introduces students to the law of torts through a detailed study of negligence and the social context in which this tort operates. This is followed by a study of other forms of tortious liability. Students will learn to apply their understanding to problem solving, as well as to communicate in a concise, accurate and effective manner.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday morning

    Legal Systems comprises an introduction to English Legal Systems in historical and international context. It includes basic outline of sources of law, law making process, institutional and court structure and legal actors within the English Legal system together with consideration of international and comparative models of law and basic legal theory.

    To successfully transact Legal Systems requires students to locate legal material, read and understand primary and secondary legal material and recognise and develop at an introductory level the basic legal skills of preparation, representation and advocacy required of professionals or successful actors within legal systems.

    The module (30 credits) will run for 30 weeks to year 1 (level 4) students. It will be delivered by way of a flexible programme of lectures, seminars, workshops and external activities (court visits and other appropriate legal forum or institution) supplemented by online (WebLearn) support.

    There are no prerequisites. Assessment will be by portfolio arising from class based exercises (40%) and a problem based exercise (60%)

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    Consumer Rights Law is a 30 week module providing students with a thorough understanding of modern consumer rights in relation to the acquisition of goods and services. As well as studying the traditional requirements of a sale of goods contract, students will also examine the laws of consumer financing and credit, the principles of the laws relating to cheques and electronic payments, statutory liability for dangerous and defective products and the principles and responsibility for regulation of the consumer market. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination. The module will be of interest to all students who wish to develop a comprehensive understanding of modern consumer rights and responsibilities in relation to goods and services. The module is relevant to a range of careers in law, retailing and consumer advice and marketing of goods and services.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    Why do some companies succeed while others fail? Are some business ideas fundamentally better than others? How can you tell which ideas are worth investing time and money in and which are not? How can you find an idea to pursue that matches your skills, network and passion?

    This module is a key introduction to identifying, critically assessing and developing new business opportunities. The approaches and processes covered can be applied equally to new commercial ideas, social enterprises or new ventures within an existing business.

    The foundation of the module is a live project where you will develop your own startup idea leading to a live pitch and designing a business model. At each stage you will learn the concepts covered in the module by applying them to your own idea. You will have the opportunity to come up with new ideas on the module and do not need to have a business idea before you begin.

    The module is relevant for anyone considering starting their own business, working for a SME or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a large organisation.

    Students opting for this modules, will NOT be able to take “Create a Winning Business 2”

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    Employment and Equality Law. This module will focus on the legal relationship between employers and workers as well as the law related to the prohibition of discrimination both within and outside of the employment context. It examines the diverse nature of the individual employment relationship, the content of the contract of employment, remedies available on it’s termination and the development of and issues arising from Equality Law both within and outside the employment context.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) and core LLB unit provides a detailed understanding of the underlying concepts principles of EU law and its ever evolving relationship to domestic law. It considers the law-making powers of the EU institutions, the constitutional principles of the EU, and the role of the European Court of Justice. It highlights the interplay between these features by focusing on substantive EU topics such as the freedom of movement of goods, services and persons, and EU Competition law. It also explores the developing concept of EU citizenship and examines the promotion and protection of human rights within the EU. The topic is hugely important for a range of employers for example, businesses, State bodies, the legal profession, the Civil Service, NGOs, and policy makers.

    This new year long (30 week) module is a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) module, and the choice of content is intended to include the key legal knowledge and materials in the subject area required by the Joint Academic Standards Board for Law. Assessment is by a combination of examination, coursework, and diagnostic/SAT style tests.

    This completely new module has also presented the module team with the opportunity to introduce new material and perspectives by reorganising and rethinking the module content and delivery to incorporate the university’s goal of developing blended learning, students' study responsibilities and employability.

    The module introduces a range of blended learning initiatives as a proactive response to the development of the university’s policy of technology enhances learning. For example, online office hours, online formative assessment submission, and new learning tools using library resources will be in place. The module will also seek to encourage and develop student learning autonomy and independent learning skills by establishing self-directed learning requirements in the diagnostic/SAT style testing assessment component and in the individual oral presentation formative assessment component. The module’s focus on employability fosters an appreciation and understanding of the use of SAT style tests for job recruitment in the area of employment in the organizations that work in the area of EU law such as the UK and EU Civil Services. There is also a lecture on working in such institutions. The oral presentation formative assessment component (along with the tutorials themselves) seeks to develop oral communication and legal presentation skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module provides an introduction to the law of evidence and to legal advocacy skills. It will concentrate upon the main concepts and principles of evidence law and explore their application by the advocate in the courtroom.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    A general introduction and overview of the framework of accountability for medical accidents and an examination of the different factors that shape such accountability i.e. legal, moral, ethical, scientific, and philosophical issues.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module provides a contextual introduction to the central areas of UK public law. First, it provides an introduction to the principles and practice relating to the legal foundations of the constitution. Second, it considers the principles of administrative law with particular reference to judicial review and other non-legal remedies available to the citizen.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module provides an overview of the practical position of women under English law, with an examination of the theoretical issues underpinning that position. As an extension of learning module, it is suitable for students from any discipline with an interest in gender and the law.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module examines issues and controversies in Law and exposes students to contemporary legal issues. Students are able to research a subject of their choice in detail and will be required to explore their personal development plan in the context of future career direction. The module will further develop students’ abilities to research a legal topic, interpret and analyse information and evaluate their findings in the context of the contemporary environment. It draws upon students’ knowledge, understanding and skills developed in earlier modules, allowing students to carry out in-depth research into a topic of their choosing.

    Students will also be directed as to appropriate research methodologies. Staff teaching on the module will also provide an overview of a number of contemporary legal issues as well as enabling students to develop effective strategies for dealing with their future career directions.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The module requires the students to undertake a detailed, critical investigation into a contentious legal topic; the investigation is structured, so that students are required to formulate a research proposal at the outset; engage with regular supervision throughout the process; and produce at the end a reflective statement describing and evaluating the experience of their research and of their undergraduate studies generally

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    The Work Placement for Professional Experience module provides students with an opportunity to experience working in a legal context, to develop the skills and abilities necessary for a graduate career, to identify their strengths and weaknesses and how they might improve their performance, and to apply theoretical legal knowledge to cases in the real world.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module will give a clear and coherent up to date account of the law of human rights and civil liberties concentrating on the position of civil liberties and human rights protection in the light of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the standards of human rights protection laid down in the European Convention of Human Rights.

    The student will be introduced to the scope of civil liberties and human rights and the machinery to redress and breaches of those rights. The student will also focus on the relationship between the individual and the state in terms of specific individual rights and freedoms.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module introduces students to Company law and will include the formation, constitution and management of companies together with share issue, share capital, loan capital and selected aspects of insolvency law.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon

    Why do some companies succeed while others fail? Are some business ideas fundamentally better than others? How can you tell which ideas are worth investing time and money in and which are not? How can you find an idea to pursue that matches your skills, network and passion?

    This module is a key introduction to identifying, critically assessing and developing new business opportunities. The approaches and processes covered can be applied equally to new commercial ideas, social enterprises or new ventures within an existing business.

    The foundation of the module is a live project where you will develop your own startup idea leading to a live pitch and designing a business model. At each stage you will learn the concepts covered in the module by applying them to your own idea. You will have the opportunity to come up with new ideas on the module and do not need to have a business idea before you begin.

    The module is relevant for anyone considering starting their own business, working for a SME or taking on an intrapreneurial role within a large organisation.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    An overview of Environmental Law at the level of Domestic, International and European Law and a critical examination of the policy upon which it based .

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The current law concerning families, children and related issues.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module provides students with an understanding of immigration law and the various categories of the law. This will involve a study of the rules relating to temporary admissions, settlement, deportation, illegal entry, removal, and of course asylum. Students will also gain an understanding of Asylum and Immigration Tribunal Chamber. They will be expected to attend hearings at the Tribunal during the course of the term.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    Intellectual Property Law is a 30 week module providing students with a thorough understanding of intellectual property law in a modern commercial context. As well as studying the traditional features of trade marks, copyright, patents, designs (overview) and EU IP competition law, students also consider the twenty-first century digital environment and contemporary commercial and governmental policy issues. The subject is very important for all businesses, marketing, media & creative industries as well as high-technology developers (e.g. IT and biotechnology) and it is taught with a contemporary and challenging focus. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination. The module will be of interest to all students who wish to develop a comprehensive understanding of intellectual property protection and understand the importance of protecting creativity and innovation in a global economy. The module is relevant for a range of careers in law, commerce, the media and industry.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    Jurisprudence is a compulsory subject for legal practice in numerous jurisdictions abroad. It is also vital to a broader theoretical, practical and ethical perspective on law and legal practice more generally. This module provides an introduction to jurisprudence or legal theory, covering basic theoretical and ethical perspectives on the law and legal practice and its contemporary context. Students will receive a sound understanding of the theories of different jurisprudential schools of thought and the contributions made to legal thinking by leading jurists from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary thinkers. In addition, the course is placed in a modern setting and aims to raise contemporary ethical debates in order to raise awareness of the ethical background against which the law and legal practice needs to be understood.

    The study of jurisprudence permits a fuller understanding of the rational and ethical values that underpin the law and systems of justice. The Law Society has sought that legal training 'make awareness of and commitment to legal values, and the moral context of the law, mandatory in undergraduate law degrees ...' Law Society Preparatory Ethics Training for Future Solicitors March 2009) This module aims to achieve this outcome.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    Whilst some commentators at the end of the 20th century adopted the view that ‘God is dead’ and that religion no longer had a role to play in society that view has changed. Increasingly religion is becoming an important issue. There are arguments about the role of religion in public life. There are conversations about religious schools and religious clothing. There are discussions about religious courts and whether modern legal disputes can be settled by religious law. Attitudes towards religion have arguably progressed from tolerance to the promotion of religious liberty as a right. New laws have been enacted, interpreted and administered. Have these new laws increased the protection given to religious individuals and groups? How have new laws interacted with older laws concerning religion? ‘Law and religion’ possesses the ‘academic credibility, intellectual substance and appropriateness of subject matter’ to be treated as an academic sub-discipline. There is a clear area of study. It is accepted as ‘applied law’ rather than ‘theoretical’ law and is concerned with the recognition and regulation of religious activities. Law and religion is also concerned with the study of religious law; the interaction of civil and criminal law with religion; religious freedom as a human right; the legal position of religious groups; legal definitions of religion; recognition and enforcement of religious law. This module will be of interest to those students wishing to embark on careers in law, the community or social sector, education, central or local government or with regulators or professional bodies. It will be of interest to any student who wishes to develop an understanding of the relationship between law and religion and law and society at large.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module provides an introduction to theories of punishment from a criminological and sociological standpoint. It also deals with aspects of sentencing practice and procedure and allows students to participate in sentencing simulation exercises and debates. Certain categories of offender (e.g. young offenders, women) are considered in depth. Finally, the issue of penal reform is addressed in the light of the most recent initiatives in the field.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    International law is increasingly important to states, organisations and individuals, and impacts on every aspect of modern life.
    This 30 credit module will provide students with a thorough knowledge of the key concepts of international law such as the sources of international law, the definition of statehood, the principle of self-determination, states’ acquisition of title to territory and jurisdiction over territory and people, state responsibility for unlawful acts, and states’ use of force. Students will also be given a solid grasp of some key areas of substantive law such as Law of the Sea and other topical areas.
    Knowledge of the key principles and substantive topics will be matched with understanding of the operation of international law in the real world. Students will be encouraged to approach the subject critically and to develop their analytic skills to the highest level.
    The module will introduce students to the current debates and challenges in this subject, with a focus on topical examples which will bring the subject to life and motivate students to explore the subject more fully.
    Teaching will be by a combination of lecture, seminar (academic discussion) and workshop (developing academic and transferable skills such as critical thinking and oral and written communication skills).
    Assessment is by a combination of examination and coursework essay.
    The module will be of interest to all students who take an interest in current affairs, international relations, the international order, international peace and security.
    The module is relevant to a wide range of careers in law, government, politics, international relations, the media, and international business.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    Companies and Governments frequently need to raise money from Individuals and organisations to fund their activities This module is intended to provide students with a lawyer’s perspective and understanding of the financial and taxation systems and the significance of fiscal policy. The module will introduce students to taxation, investment, financial markets and transactions and examine how core legal concepts are applied in practical contexts. Students will analyse the regulatory and legal framework, the relationship between substantive law and financial regulation, questions of law and risk in financial markets, the legal aspects of taxation, banking, lending, securities and derivatives activity, and the legal and regulatory context of financial market failures. Consideration will also be given to the interplay between law and ethics within the realms of finance.

    In light of the central role that finance and taxation plays in the economy this module will be particularly relevant to students wishing to embark on careers in law, commerce, industry, central or local government or with regulators or professional bodies. It will be of interest to any student who wishes to develop an understanding of the relationship between law and finance.

    Read full details.

If you’re studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

In Year 1 you’ll study core modules designed to give you a solid foundation in the principles of law, including the legal system and criminal law.

In Year 2 you’ll have a choice of optional modules designed to help you develop your knowledge of the law-related topics that most interest you, such as public law, women and law, and employment and equality law. You’ll also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience through a work placement.

In Year 3 you’ll study a range of core modules, including a law dissertation and a work placement for professional experience. You’ll also have the choice of optional modules created to further your knowledge and ready you for the world of work, including company law, the law of finance and taxation, penal policy and creating a winning business.

Year 1 core modules:

  • Legal System
  • Contract Law
  • Law of Tort
  • Criminal Law

Year 2 optional modules:

  • Public Law
  • European Union Law
  • Employment & Equality Law
  • Consumer Rights Law
  • Evidence and Advocacy
  • Medical Law
  • Women and Law

Year 3 core modules:

  • Law Dissertation
  • Law Extended Essay
  • Work Placement for Professional Experience

Year 3 optional modules:

  • Intellectual Property Law
  • Civil Liberties and Human Rights
  •  Public International Law
  • Company Law
  • Immigration and Asylum Law and Tribunals
  • Family and Child Law
  • The Law of Finance and Taxation
  • Jurisprudence
  • Environmental Law
  • Law and Religion
  • Penal Policy
  • Creating a Winning Business 2
  • Extension of Knowledge Module

This degree is recognised worldwide as a quality qualification for entry into a number of non-law professions such as politics, business, work within the law commission, work in the voluntary sector, trademark or patent agent roles, insurance, banking, civil service, local authorities, journalism and media.

The course is not designed to comply with the requirements of the Joint Academic Stage Board of the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Standards Board for the completion of the Academic Stage of training for the legal profession. Other professional and academic postgraduate courses may, however, be available, particularly the Masters in Law.

You can also consider alternative careers involving law which do not require approval of JASB, such as paralegal, patent lawyers or licensed conveyancers. Students who wish to be considered for Year 2 of the LLB programme may apply to the course leader at the end of Year 1. Applications are considered on a case-by-case basis and are at the discretion of the course leader.

Our director of Clinical Legal Education, who works within the Faculty, delivers employability lectures and workshops to new students at the start of each academic year and further lectures take place during Activity weeks. The topics covered in the lectures include personal development, selecting career paths (law/non-law related), acquiring work experience and commercial awareness, the employability market situation, writing CVs and covering letters, and interview questions and tips.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2016 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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