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Health and Social Care - BSc (Hons)

Why study this course?

Develop the confidence, knowledge and skills required for a career in the health and social care sector. The programme is aligned to the standards specified by Skills for Health (the Skills Council for the NHS). Once you've successfully completed the course you'll be able to demonstrate to employers how your advanced skills conform to the National Occupational Standards. The course is also fully validated by the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) and if you choose to specialise in housing you'll receive free student membership of the CIH.

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The Health and Social Care BSc degree will provide you with the knowledge and skills to analyse important public health and social care issues. The course is informed by current and expected changes in the UK healthcare sector, and given the UK's ageing population, advances in healthcare technology, quality concerns and the rising cost of providing healthcare.

As a fully validated course by the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH), we provide a comprehensive and comparative approach to health and social care. The course is delivered using a blended learning approach through online seminars, case studies and video content, helping you to develop confidence, knowledge and skills required for your career.

Our teaching is underpinned by current research and you’ll be taught by research-active teaching staff and experts in the health and social care sector,  acquiring skills in observation, enquiry and critical analysis under their guidance. You'll cover public health, health promotion, policy and ethical aspects of care, and develop your ability to use evidence to inform your decisions and deal with the critical issues in health and social care.

Employability is at the heart of this course and there are opportunities for personal and professional development, including our Open Language Programme which offers the chance to learn a language, and our work placements which give you practical experience in the industry.

Assessment

You'll be assessed via seen examinations, short answer papers, practical reports and reviews, case studies, group assessment projects, presentations, essays and health profiles.

Professional accreditation

This course is fully validated by the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH).

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • for entry in the 2016-17 academic year: at least 280 UCAS points from three or more A levels (eg BBC) or 320 UCAS points from a BTEC National (eg DDM), a Level 3 Advanced Diploma (or equivalent)
  • for entry in the 2017-18 academic year: a minimum of grades BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate Access or other preparatory courses or have appropriate work experience.

We also welcome mature students without formal qualifications who are able to demonstrate enthusiasm, commitment and the ability to benefit from higher education.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    For students wishing to work within health, public health, Social care and community contexts, it is very important to understand and to be able to apply techniques of reflective learning and self awareness. This module introduces the concepts of action and reflective learning, and through a combination of lectures, seminars and action learning sets exposes students to a range of techniques, and asks students to apply these to themselves, other modules, their personal aspirations, their work/volunteering experience, their organisations and future work in a community context. The collaborative learning will enable students to progress from being a passive to an active and reflective learner in control of own learning. They support others in making developmental decisions and choices, principally through work undertaken in Action Learning Sets. Specific attention is given to diversity and the development of inter-personal skills that support the learning process in a group context.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday morning

    This module will enable students to recognise and demonstrate the importance of communication as a core skill both in their academic journey and also for working in health and social care settings. Students will consider the theory and practice of communication in a variety of formats; the communication needs of a range of service user groups within diverse settings with colleagues and peers. Students will also develop their reflective skills in order to appraise the development of their own communication skills particularly in response to feedback

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module examines the changing pattern of households and family life, work and employment, with a particular emphasis on differences in cultures and how this interlinks with social divisions. It addresses causes and patterns of inequality, and the opportunities and challenges of living in a multi-cultural society. There is an introduction to anthropological perspectives to these issues, and to the different approaches to communities and cultures.
    It includes significant elements of skills development, orientation to the university and the expectations of the university and course. It will also introduce issues around the use of IT, and provide subject-specific IT and web skills training. It is taught over 30 weeks and is assessed by two essays, each 200 words long.

    SS4000

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (January start) - Thursday morning

    This module introduces students to the main developments in health and social carestarting with a history of welfare and institutions, building towards an analysis of contemporary issues, debates and influences on health and social care delivery. The module addresses the diversity of settings and roles in health and social care. It addresses inequalities in health and social care, in particular the social determinants of health. From the historical context in the UK, the emergence of public health and policy will be explored.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module provides an introduction to social theories, social constructs and social policy to enable students to contextualise their professional studies within a broad social science framework. The investigation of the ‘social’ will provide students with an introduction to social science research as a basis for evidence informed practice.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module will provide students with an introduction to the discipline of Sociology and some of the basic skills of identifying, applying and evaluating sociological approaches, concepts and debates to everyday situations. It will also provide you with an introduction to constructing sociological arguments, thinking critically and assessing sociological evidence.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module introduces students to the both ethics and research through an exploration of principles, theories and practices that inform decision making in professional contexts. They are taught in two distinct parts. In the first part students will study ethics using sector specific professional codes of ethical conduct and will examine underlying normative ethical theories as they are represented within such codes. Current debates in ethical thinking for professional practice will be considered, providing opportunities for the critical application of different ethical perspectives to a wide range of contemporary moral issues and situations within professional contexts. In the second part, students will be introduced to the research process and research knowledge and skills relevant to professional and academic development. These research principles will provide a foundation for understanding approaches to social research and evidence based practice and research design.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module focuses on the local, national and international perspectives of health promotion. The module examines social, political and economic factors influencing health choices and the impact of recent legislative changes on health outcomes in these contexts. It is designed to enable students identify and analyse key issues influencing the promotion of health in healthcare systems and how these systems are shaped by health policies.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module interrogates the interaction between society and health. It provides an overview of the interrelation of expert and common-sense understandings of health and illness in society. It also introduces social scientific arguments about the way disease is recognised by lay people and the medical profession, quantified, and socially managed; and considers the social patterning of illness. The module considers how illness and disability (and indeed health) can be under-stood as socially meaningful processes. It looks primarily at qualitative sociological research on the way patients and health-workers interpret and adjust to various forms of ailment.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module is designed to develop a critical awareness of policy changes, professional approaches and contexts, professionalism, organisational functioning to promote effective partnership working. Students will be introduced to and explore key organisational theories and practices and develop a critical understanding of the impact of organisational culture and change and policies upon professional practice. The module also develops student skills in effective teamwork, collaborative decision-making and negotiation through a series of participative learning experiences.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    This module has been designed to develop students’transferable employability skills in self and project management in order to test future career plans. Student’s personal goals will provide the momentum to complete a small-scale project addressing career aspirations in relation to employers’ needs and emerging trends in different sectors. An important aspect of the module is the development of personal resources and networks, this may include working directly with an agency or community.
    Students will learn about managing self, goal setting, appraisal, the different stages of project management and develop a critical understanding of organisational cultures.
    Students will achieve this range of skills and understandings throughtutor guided, peer group and independent learning activities leading to the completion of a career development plan and the development of resources and networks. A reflective account of the process of developing their project incorporating relevant theory will enable students to chart their progress towards their goals.

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module has been designed to develop students’ understanding, theoretical knowledge and practical skills of leadership and management in the context of professional practice. Students will develop analytical skills to understand critically of the role of management in leading teams and in providing ethical and quality services in the context of resource constraints and changing social environments.The module will embed employability skills by simulating work environments and will employ skills of problem solving and decision making, staff appraisal and professional behaviour required for provision of policy and practice in professional contexts.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module re-visits research and evaluation methods and their relevance to professional practice contexts, culminating in the completion of a substantive student led project. This is a core module for Social Work, Health and Social Care, Youth Work and Youth Studies students. It builds on earlier core modules that address research and ethical issues at levels 4 and 5. Students will have scope to develop further their critical analytical skills, engage with the research process and undertake a substantive exploration of a relevant subject and with a view to consolidating transferable skills for future employment.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module introduces students to the determinants of health, health and healthcare in urban settings: itis underpinned by the notion of urban health crisis and the controversy of health and healthcare in cities. It uses a public health approach to examine how the wider determinants of health (especially the social, economic and physical conditions) impact on health and access to healthcare in urban settings. As this impact is most significant in global cities, therefore, the module examines health and healthcare in cities like London.Thus, the module gives students an opportunity to consider health trends in relation to distinctive features of urban populations and explore persistent challenges to the organisation and delivery of health services in urban settings, against the backdrop of globalisation. The impact of recent local, national and international policy initiatives on the emerging and long-standing problems of health and healthcare in London and other selected cities will also be examined.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module aims to examine current thinking regarding development issues in the voluntary and community sectors. Specific emphasis will be given to capacity building, social enterprise and social entrepreneurship. Specific community development projects will be explored within the context of community action. Questions will be asked about how community development reflects and / or challenges changes in the external environment; including legislation and funding mechanisms. Case studies from community-based initiatives in the UK and globally will be used to illustrate current debates. Students will be required to participate in the planning, initiation and development of a real world live project. Work will be reviewed against the National Occupational Standards for Community Development Work.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module will recognise the multidisciplinary context of ageing and encompass the biological, psychological, social gerontological, political and sociological perspectives. Demographic trends suggest that health promotion and meeting the health needs of older people are and will continue to be a growing necessity and priority for health and social care. The module will cover relevant theories, emerging policies and research in relation to older people in the UK, practice and ethical issues, including consent for interviews. Definitions of old age will be explored along with the social and cultural contexts. The debate about usage of health and socialcare services and costs is addressed. As London’s diverse population ages, the health and social care challenges grow to ensure an efficient and effective service user and carer focused service. The integration of health and social care organisations has changed, and will change, the employment base for many professionals and has major implications for the care and service delivery for older people across the statutory, voluntary and independent sectors.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    Homelessness and Housing Policy outlines the key issues of British housing policy with a focus upon the central theme of homelessness. It is divided into three parts: Historical context; the housing sector and contemporary issues. Combined with other modules in the faculty, such as ‘Housing Issues and Housing Solutions’, this module provides a housing pathway for students wishing to develop or further their careers in this area. The module runs for 15 weeks, and is assessed through an on-line discussion and a 2000 word report.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    Housing Issues and Housing Solutions outlines the key issues that face people working in housing, residents and community workers. It will provide a policy context, but will focus on a practical approach to dealing with community-related & housing issues, their causes and solutions. It will examine the rights and obligations of residents and identify good practice in key management areas such as resident involvement, dealing with anti-social behaviour and disrepair. Combined with other modules in the faculty, such as ‘Housing and Homelessness’, this module provides a housing pathway for students wishing to develop or further their careers in this area. The module runs for 15 weeks, and is assessed by an essay, a report and an interactive Weblearn test.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    This module is designed to help students to develop employability skills and through exposure to work experiences related to their discipline through either voluntary or paid work. Students will have scope to develop a learning contract to cover areas of learning of particular interest. Students may chose to use an existing work or voluntary placement, with approval from the module leader to ensure the experience will be sufficiently aligned to the aims and potential to meet the learning outcomes. Advice about gaining access to internships and voluntary placements will be made available as this is a taster module and delays in selecting an agency should be avoided. While it is not essential supervision in the work place is desirable and we will require proof that the agency will provide training and support, normally a letter and then confirmed by the signed learning contract. Given this is a short placement where students are intending to work with vulnerable children or adults, appropriate police and other checks must be cleared prior to starting. This can take many weeks so planning well in advance of starting the module is essential. A CRB can be arranged through the University but students will be required to pay. Key aspects of the modules will include gaining first hand experience of work and the ability to develop and showcase skills to potential employers.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The module takes a life course perspective to consider what is mental health in infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life and old age, and what are the main threats to mental health at each stage, and what services and support exist to help those with marked problems. Students choose to explore a particular type of problem at a particular life stage in more depth, and gain feedback from a formative assessment in seminars to support the 3,000 word essay required in week 15.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module is designed to help students to develop employability skills and through exposure to work experiences related to their discipline through either voluntary or paid work. Student may wish to explore setting up their own enterprise and start up projects. Students will have scope to develop a learning contract to cover areas of learning of particular interest. Students may chose to use an existing work or voluntary placement, with approval from the module leader to ensure the experience will be sufficiently aligned to the aims and potential to meet the learning outcomes. Advice about gaining access to internships and voluntary placements will be made available as this is a taster module and delays in selecting an agency should be avoided. While it is not essential supervision in the work place is desirable and we will require proof that the agency will provide training and support, normally a letter and then confirmed by the signed learning contract. Where students are intending to work with vulnerable children or adults, appropriate police and other checks must be cleared prior to starting. This can take many weeks so planning for this module is essential. A CRB can be arranged through the University but students will be required to pay. Key aspects of the modules will include gaining first hand experience of work and the ability to develop and showcase skills to potential employers.

    Read full details.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits)

Year 1 (Level 4) modules include:

  • Introducing Health and Social Care
  • Communicating with Different Client Groups
  • Social Contexts for Professional Practice
  • Action Learning and Professional Practice

Year 2 (Level 5) modules include:

  • Health Promotion and Policy
  • Ethics and Research in Professional Contexts
  • Health Illness and Society
  • Partnership Working
  • Self-Directed Development Project

Year 3 (Level 6) modules include:

  • Leadership and Management in Professional Contexts
  • Research and Evaluation Skills for Professional Contexts
  • Urban Health
  • Development and Social Enterprise (optional)
  • Homelessness and Housing Policy (optional)
  • Experiences of Later Life (optional)
  • Understanding Mental Health (optional)
  • Housing Issues and Housing Solutions (optional)
  • Extension of Knowledge Module (optional)
  • Work-based Learning Placement (optional)

This programme is aligned to Skills for Health competences, the skills sector council for the healthcare sector where you'll be able to map your competences by the end of the programme enhancing your employment opportunities.

Successful completion of this course offers improved career opportunities in the fields of health and social care. This may be within the NHS, voluntary and independent sectors. Our graduates have found careers in mental health and medical rehabilitation, and as support workers in the NHS, housing associations and charity organisations.

This degree programme is also excellent preparation for research or postgraduate study.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2016 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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