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Architecture - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

This undergraduate architecture degree is your first step towards a professional career in architecture as you’ll complete the course with exemption from RIBA Part 1. Through our combination of practical design work, formal teaching and field work, you’ll gain the skills and experience necessary to continue on to complete your RIBA part 2 and 3. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.


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This degree course offers a multifaceted design-based education that, on successful completion, provides exemption from RIBA 1 – the first stage of a professional qualification in architecture. Typically, graduates go on to RIBA Part 2 and 3 at London Metropolitan University.

Our course is centred on three key themes: the idea and practice of making, an architect’s professional duty of care, and social and environmental responsibility.

You'll take classes in our well-resourced design studios, where you’ll have the chance to work with high-end analogue and digital printing facilities. You’ll also get access to our textile, ceramic, furniture-making and photography workshops.

We complement formal teaching and field work with practical design exploration. The staff is made up of renowned practitioners who bring a wealth of technical expertise to the table and who provide insight into industry best practices within a constantly evolving arena.

With their combined knowledge of traditional and contemporary practices, and of basic principles and new innovations, they're well equipped to help you work towards your own developmental goals and to explore potential career paths.

Assessment

The Architects' Registration Board (ARB) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) set out general criteria for assessment within the "Prescription of Qualifications".

Project work makes up 50% of your final mark in each year, and you'll be assessed primarily on your achievements, demonstration of competence and the quality of the work in your portfolio.

Professional accreditation

The course is validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and prescribed by the Architects’ Registration Board (ARB). Students who are awarded BA (Hons) Architecture are exempted from RIBA Part 1.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBB in three A levels, one of which comes from a relevant subject area such as Art, Humanities or the Social Sciences (or a minimum of 120 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification in an art related subject)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)
  • potential in spatial design, a creative imagination and visual or constructive aptitude
  • a portfolio review

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS at level 6.0, with no individual component of less than 5.5. For more information about English qualifications, please see our English language requirements.

Entry from appropriate foundation and access courses will also be considered.

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Architecture and Interior Design Extended Degree (with Foundation Year).

Interviews

We normally ask candidates to attend a portfolio interview to talk about the process and ideas of their portfolio work. Please be aware that digital portfolios can't be viewed at the interview. The interview day includes a general introduction, a tour and the chance to meet a variety of staff and students.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    The module offers a sequence of three intensive programmes or ‘mini-blocks’, tailored to the interests of specific groups of students. The module engages the student in thinking about their subject area, how it is defined and practiced, the richness of its resources, and how it opens up questions of context. In particular the module investigates how context might be framed, for example culturally, historically, economically, socially, theoretically or through practice. Students are encouraged to see connections and reflect on what they see in ways that build skills of communication and help articulate ideas. The module also helps the student, through learning how to identify, access and use knowledge profitably, to become knowledgeable about their subject area, its extent, its language and conventions, its history and practice.

    The three mini-blocks have equally weighted single assessments . The assessments include a range of different modes of written assignments, for example, Patchwork, Case Study, or Essay.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module introduces the scope and scale of architecture and interior architecture through design projects, culminating in a well-resolved small building design, small-scale adaptation of an existing building or a well resolved interior project. It emphasizes the critical understanding of contextand introduces methods of observation, analysis and interpretation of conditions affecting the project. It demonstrates how a creative engagement with these conditions informs and assists the design process. The module develops via a sequence of relatively simple projects, each of which, or component of which, focuses on a specific set of relationships. Together these projects introduce the student to the different and inter-related issues and inputs affecting the architectural design. These include the relationships between architectural design and its physical setting, a client’s brief and the needs of users, its cultural context and the natural environment, itsspatial strategy and methods of construction.

    The module design process is expansive and exploratory, and emphasizes the creative and imaginative thinking involved. Students learn how to retrieve information and research project ideas as well as develop and present their ideas using the range of techniques developed in AR4001. It developes an understanding how an architectural or interior project is defined through wide reference to historical and current practice and practice in related disciplines in including art, interior design, planning, urban design and engineering.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The module introduces the basic process of design for architecture and interior architecture, from conceptual idea to a three-dimensional realisation. Students learn to produce a range of drawing and modeling techniques that enable them to creatively explore and engage in the design process and begin to see the relation between intention, process and outcome through actively producing work.

    The module is designed to orientate students through the introduction of different ways of thinking about and communicating ideas about the subject and the context in which they working.It introduces a range of drawing and modelling techniques necessary to represent and communicate design ideas. It establishes the need for designers to think critically in their use of different media and in working at different scales. The module encourages students to explore the possibilities of evocative, analytical and measured drawing in the representation of existing and proposed spaces and their 3-dimensional and material qualities.

    The module introduces the use of research, precedents, modelling and testing ideas in a design project through techniques of making and prototyping, workshop practice and the creative use of materials in producing a design.In terms of drawing the techniques involved range from measured drawings/models, to conceptual sketches to evocative representations of the design in both 2D and 3D. The visual and material investigations are broadened in scope through precedent studies that include, for example, buildings, interiors, spaces, projects, technologies, details, and exemplars from traditional and emergent fields of art and design practice. It links with art practice and examines the role played by drawing, making and representation in design.

    The module includes formal introductions to the School’s making workshops, the acquisition of basic technical skills and competence, sound studio practice and health and safety considerations. It provides a basic introduction to the appropriate use of materials, related processes and technical applications in the development of ideas, models and prototypes.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The module introduces the disciplines of building technology and enables the student to identify and work with the basic principles involved in their application. The module introduces structural design, material properties and selection, building services and environmental design, design and construction of building elements and components. It is focused on well-considered sustainable design principles and the construction of habitable space in smaller scale buildings and interiors. The module explores the different disciplines of building technology in-situ through site visits and surveys, through making and drawing workshops, as well as through lectures, seminars and the utilisation of a wide variety of published sources.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    The module offers a sequence of three intensive programmes or ‘mini-blocks’ tailored to the interests of specific groups of students. It provides a range of studies that address the character and conditions of cultural production including how they operate in practice. The module helps to prepare the student for their final-year dissertation and their future role as professionals and practitioners. The student encounters different perspectives on their subject area and undertakes different forms of coursework aimed at helping inform their choice of dissertation topic and approach.

    The module begins to situate the student within the process of constructing knowledge. This process may be approached from the point of view of the producer or consumer, the critic or the professional, the academic or the practitioner, in that there are a number of players involved. The module recognises that the student is also an active player in the process: what they bring to the construction of knowledge counts; and how effectively they construct it depends on how well they understand and interact with the field. To this end the module encourages the skills of reading and literacy as required – historical, analytical, textual, visual or technical – to help support rigorous and enterprising thought.

    The three blocks have equally weighted single assessments.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module focuses on the process of designing two or more building projects. This is done through to the introduction of more complex criteria, than at the previous level, and anticipates a higher level of spatial and material resolution. The module develops skills in the integration of structural, material, environmental and experiential strategies that are tested through the resolution of the design projects. Students are expected to offer articulate explanations of their proposals, be able to discuss their ethical and professional considerations, present their case for specific social and environmental strategies, demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between building technologies and the execution of their design.

    Students learn to develop and present their building designs using the range of techniques developed in Design Skills 2.1. The design process continues to be expansive and exploratory, and emphasizes the creative and imaginative thinking involved. Students are involved in the primary research associated with their project/s and work in groups as well as independently. They cultivate a shared understanding of the project contexts and their briefs enabling them to work collaboratively and share tasks, review each other’s work, and enrich their own ideas.

    The module fosters the development of a personal position and working methods as part of the attributes required by a designer. The projects are presented through drawings, models and prototypes using a range of media.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module focuses on expanding and strengthening the range of skills, techniques, methods and processes needed to develop the design projects undertaken in Design Project 2.2. The skills are developed, within the projects, rather than separately. The module provides the material basis for design research, the design process and the development and testing of design propositions. The range of skills explores, analyzes and interprets the precedents, observations and ideas that apply to architectural designs, their formulation and construction. Students learn to select the most appropriate modeling techniques for exploring specific aesthetic and technical requirements.

    In particular the module introduces and practices digital drawing and modeling techniques. The module includes formal introductions to the School’s digital facilities, including digital modeling at Metworks, and the acquisition of technical skills and competence. It provides an introduction to the appropriate use of a range of software packages and their applications in the development of drawings and models.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module builds upon and extends the knowledge and understanding gained in AR4003 Technology 1. It focuses in more detail on how different aspects of technology interact within the context of larger and more complex buildings. The module introduces methods, terms and techniques that can be used to evaluate the range of different relationships that appear under the heading of technology. In particular the module investigates buildings and interiors that may involve multiple clients, for example public buildings and/or medium-density housing. It examines how and why standards are developed as well as the remit for research and experiment. The module further expands the knowledge of structures, materials, construction and detailing, environmental performance and comfort and building services established in AR4003 Technology 1, with particular attention given to sustainability as an ethical framework of values and responsibilities shaping the design of buildings and interiors.

    The module introduces as a framework the professional practice and academic framework of architecture as outlined by the Architects Registration Board’s Prescription of Qualifications Criteria (GC1-GC11)

    Year long module
    Assessment: 60% Technology Book, 40% Annotated Drawings; 0% Satisfactory Attendance

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module is framed in terms of a dissertation. The student undertakes an enquiry into a topic of his or her own choice and, based on this enquiry, develops an extended critical study. The module involves individual supervision designed to support the student’s ambitions and confidence in becoming an independent learner, building on techniques and knowledge developed in previous years, and providing scope for initiative and development. The dissertation demonstrates the student’s ability to thoroughly research a topic, use appropriate methods of investigation, and work methodically and productively.

    The subject matter of the dissertation can be theoretical, technical, or historical, should be closely related to the student’s main field of study and be complimentary to their practice. It may be envisaged as one of several different types: for example, visual, technical or other non-written material may form the subject of the enquiry and comprise an integral part of the whole; the dissertation may be professionally oriented and include field-work; or it might be academic and theoretical in its source material and methodology. Its form and approach can reflect a broad range of discipline-specific approaches based on discussion and agreement with the supervisor and/or course leader.

    Students may develop their topic independently or, as an option, within a specific dissertation Interest or Subject Group. Interest or Subject Groups will provide a short taught programme. They are offered on an annual basis and may incorporate:

    • research based specialisms
    • areas of scholarly interest in history and theory
    • industry related practice
    • workshop, digital or media based technical studies

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module establishes a process of research, design development and proposition that generates the design brief for Design Project Resolution 3.2: Comprehensive Design project. It supports the student as an independent learner within the framework of the Studio. Whilst improving their practical skills and refining their ability to use them productively, the focus in this module is on developing a depth of knowledge and understanding and strengthening approaches to research and project development.

    The student has already been introduced to the basic range of constituents and conditions that pertain to the design of a building in their previous design projects, technology studies, and historical, theoretical and professional studies. In this module the student is expected to draw on these as well as the agenda offered by their choice of Studio. The module helps the student establish ownership of the process of research, design development and proposition that generates the design brief and its resolution in the project. The module allows the students the opportunity to test working methods, clarify intentions, frame their project proposal and develop their design position within an evaluative and critical context, including external and professional reference points.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    As the culmination of the design studies within the BA (Hons) Architecture course the module allows the student to excel in employing their design ability. Deriving from the studio programme, the final project will communicate an appropriate level of ambition, complexity and coherence in its design resolution. The creative dialogue with other areas of architectural knowledge informed by and informing the strategic and detailed design development will extend the understanding of the project and demonstrate the qualities of the proposal.

    The module uses the research and brief making in the Design Project Development module and emphasizes the detailed resolution and critical assessment of a complex architectural design. It runs in conjunction with the Technology 3, Integrated Design Audit module that requires specific and highly detailed appraisal of its cultural, professional, technical and environmental issues.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The module enables the student to demonstrate their integration and synthesis of key areas of professional architectural knowledge within the context of their major design project. The project follows the process of design development using consultants from within the department and externally to introduce a range of perspectives, issues and interests within each project. This process is recorded, evaluated and reviewed in relation to the major design project.

    The module provides a practical framework through which students can demonstrate compliance with professional practice and academic discipline of architecture as outlined by the Architects Registration Board’s Prescription of Qualifications Criteria (GC1-GC11)

    Read full details.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

Year 1 modules include:

  • Design Skills 1.1
  • Design Project 1.2
  • Cultural and Contextual Studies 1 (Architecture)
  • Technology 1

Year 2 modules include:

  • Design Skills 2.1
  • Design Project 2.2
  • Cultural and Contextual Studies 2 (Architecture)
  • Technology 2

Year 3 modules include:

  • Design Development 3.1
  • Critical and Contextual Studies: Dissertation (Architecture)
  • Technology 3: Integrated Design Audit

"Tutors are very enthusiastic and they try to help as much as possible."

"Design studios are excellent. The teaching staff are passionate about the subject."

Student appraisal to the RIBA, 2012

Following successful completion of the course, most graduates go on to complete their RIBA Part 2 and 3, and gain a professional qualification in architecture. Previous alumni have worked for companies such as Caruso St John, David Chipperfield Architects, Macreanor Lavington, Tony Fretton Architects and SANAA in Tokyo.

Graduating with this degree provides you with the core knowledge and skills needed to work in fields such as interior design, urban design and planning. You'll leave with a high-quality portfolio of work, an understanding of relevant cultural and social issues, and the research, design, making and presentation skills valued in many design-related professions.

In year 1 you'll go on a field trip within Europe, and in year 2 and year 3 you'll join a field trip related to your chosen studio subject.

Previous field trip destinations have included Iceland, India, Texas and Turkey, and many of our links are part of a long-term commitment to social engagement in these countries.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time. 

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of- the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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