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Business Economics - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

This course focuses on the economic factors that affect businesses today. You'll be taught by staff who advise major organisations such as the World Bank, and will gain an in-depth knowledge of economic analysis and how it relates to business. 

In the most recent (2015-16) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

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This degree course focuses on the economic factors that affect businesses today. You’ll learn to interpret and analyse financial information, and to understand this data in the context of the wider business market. You'll cover topics such as the impact of technology, international trade, management and leadership, and ethical concerns.

As well as a solid knowledge base you’ll develop a broad range of vital skills, such as problem solving, team-working, IT and communication. You’ll also be trained in job applications and interview techniques, to prepare you for a successful career after graduation. Short and long accredited work placements are available as part of the course, to give you real-world experience.

Throughout the course you’ll have access to our extensive facilities and receive constant support from our experienced staff, many of whom are expert advisers to organisations such as the Bank of England, the European Commission, the UK Government, the World Bank and industry trade bodies. Our teaching was rated “Excellent” – the highest possible rating for a UK university  – by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA).

Assessment

You'll participate in interactive group sessions and workshops, and will be assessed through industry projects, case studies, executive summary reports, computer-based projects, group presentations, scenario simulations, and exams.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades CCC in three A levels in academic or business subjects (or a minimum of 96 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent) 

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entr is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

Specific qualifications that may make you eligible for advanced entry to this course include a foundation degree or HND in a related subject.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The module will teach students about the process of recording, presenting and interpreting financial information. It will also develop their IT skills by teaching how to set up spreadsheets and use the internet to research into limited companies. The module then develops an introductory framework for the understanding and analysis of key financial markets and institutions in mature economies.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The focus of this module is business. What is it? What drives it? What makes it successful? Are there ideal environments in which businesses start, grow and mature? Are there ideal types of businesses?
    The turbulent and disruptive upheavals of the twenty-first century, including natural disasters, corporate failures, financial crisis, recession and austerity have prompted a review of the traditional view of business and enterprise as encompassing large organisations in a steady state of long-term planning. Today the dynamic of how business is conducted is changing. Recent research (DfBIS, 2011) has shown that 50% of private sector turnover is generated by small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In addition, the DfBIS, (2011) suggests that, “60% of private sector jobs (almost 14 million) are provided by SMEs”.

    This module provides students with an insight into the world of business. It examines various types of businesses and how they work. It explores the environment and its impact on the survival, success and growth of an enterprise. It covers the practical functions of business and enterprise such as sources of funding; marketing; communication; the theory and practice of selling; supply chains; the highly competitive global marketplace and e-business. It provides an underpinning of the operations function and an introduction to the concept of quality.

    The module is cognisant of the increasing contribution of SMEs to the economy and provides a focus on the knowledge and skills students need to qualify them as employees of choice in high potential small dynamic businesses. The module seeks to foster students’ embryonic seeds of ambition to be enterprising employers of the future by setting up and running their own company.

    The module features an interactive business simulation designed to replicate the multidimensional nature of business and management. It encapsulates fundamental cross-functional disciplines such as sales, marketing, operations and finance. Student teams are progressively led through major decisions including human resources through to strategy as they manage their own virtual company. Student teams compete against each other in an online multiplayer environment.

    This simulation provides invaluable hands on experience for students, requiring them to analyse data, collaborate with each other, and make managerial decisions. By bringing concepts to life it also encourages them to engage with the theoretical material they are learning.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module introduces and develops the principles of micro- and macroeconomics providing a secure foundation for students pursuing specialist degrees in Economics and Business Economics. The microeconomics element of the module will examine supply and demand analysis, theories of consumer behaviour and theories of the firm. It will also introduce the distribution of income, market efficiency, market failure, and international trade.

    The macroeconomics element of the module will consider long run economic growth and short-run business cycles. Students will be introduced to key variables and concepts in macroeconomics, national income accounting, simple macroeconomic models and policy issues. They will consider the main determinants of economic growth, short-run fluctuations in economic activity, inflation, unemployment, the balance of payments and exchange rates.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module is concerned with providing students with quantitative skills and a foundation in mathematical and statistical concepts and techniques so they can solve economic problems and understand economic analysis. Students will understand how mathematical and statistical methods relate to economic theory.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module aims to introduce students to the dynamics of international business operations and the evolving world markets. International economic issues influence the formulation of trade and investment policies as well as entreprise strategies, and this module gives students the opportunity to understand and discuss the challenges therein for multinational businesses. In recent years, we have seen dramatic economic changes such as new theoretical developments, empirical studies and the growing role played by emerging economies. The aim of this module is therefore to give students a strong understanding of key theories and policies which will be analysed in the light of current international debates.

    There are 2 main themes to the teaching of this module. The first section of the module develops an understanding of the international business environment including globalisation of firms’ activities, the changing patterns of foreign direct investment, collaborative ventures and global strategy. The second section of the module focuses on the global market place in which international businesses operate and comprises an understanding of trade theories and government policies.. The module also covers some international macroeconomic debates such as the operation of financial markets and international lending combined with a critical analysis of recent events in the economy.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module focuses on the theory and application of the Classical Linear Regression Model, the violation of its assumptions and its extensions. The module provides students with the knowledge and skills to design, undertake, and evaluate empirical work within economics, finance and business.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module develops from the foundations of macroeconomics covered in EC4006. The module aims to develop student’s knowledge and understanding of key macroeconomic processes that determine equilibrium in the short-run, medium-run and the long-run. It examines the goods and financial markets as foundation for understanding the IS/LM model in a closed and open economy. These core topics provide the student with the basic understanding of what determines equilibrium in the short-run. This is developed further by introducing the analysis of the labour market, which is the key to an understanding of the AD/AS model and equilibrium in the medium-run. The analysis of the IS/LM model and AD/AS will also be applied to the open economy. The module proceeds to develop core principles for understanding what determines equilibrium in the long-run. Finally, we consider extensions to the above framework by covering topics such as the Phillips Curve, the role of expectations, exchange rates, government debt, hyperinflation and recent global events.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module provides a basic grounding in intermediate microeconomics. It covers the constituents of markets, namely supply (producer theory) and demand (consumer theory), and considers examples of externalities and market failure. Strategic behaviour and the role of uncertainty are emphasised. The module also discusses departures from the theoretical predictions of how rational consumers behave (behavioural economics) and also why those departures may take place (experimental economics and performativity).

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module develops a framework for analysing important themes and events in the international economy such as globalisation, economic growth, economic crises, commodity markets and price volatility. Subsequently, students will get the opportunity to carry out further research on a chosen topic, undertake qualitative and/or quantitative analysis and write up a final research report. In order to undertake their research reports, students will need to hone specific skills such as econometric and statistical techniques, the ability to prepare business reports, develop case-studies and be able to understand research methodology and apply relevant analytical skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module develops student’s knowledge and understanding of work, labour markets, employment, and reward. It examines broad human resource and labour market issues such as differential pay rates, labour migration, unemployment and discrimination, as well as economic issues specific to individual organisations such as worker recruitment, training, motivation, retention, payment systems and performance bonuses.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module aims to provide and in-depth knowledge and understanding of the economic laws and mechanisms that define and rule the economic environment of industries. The focus is mainly put on imperfectly competitive industries and the rationale of regulation and means of action of governments are investigated.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The module explores the role of corporate governance and social responsibility concepts, principles and practices in dealing with the competing interests of various stakeholders in modern corporate entities and financial institutions.
    Emphasis is placed on how corporate governance can assist in ensuring accountability to the owners and other stakeholders in the firm. The rationale and motivation for corporate entities and financial institutions to deal with social and environmental issues is explored in detail.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon
    • spring semester - Thursday morning
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    Why do some companies succeed while others fail? Are some business ideas fundamentally better than others? How can you tell which ideas are worth investing time and money in and which are not? How can you find an idea to pursue that matches your skills, network and passion?

    This module is a key introduction to identifying, critically assessing and developing new business opportunities. The approaches and processes covered can be applied equally to new commercial ideas, social enterprises or new ventures within an existing business.

    The foundation of the module is a live project where you will develop your own startup idea leading to a live pitch and designing a business model. At each stage you will learn the concepts covered in the module by applying them to your own idea. You will have the opportunity to come up with new ideas on the module and do not need to have a business idea before you begin.

    The module is relevant for anyone considering starting their own business, working for a SME or taking on an entrepreneurial role within a large organisation.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    In the 21st century organisational managers and leaders are constantly asked to work both harder and smarter and to ensure that those who work for them do the same. Stock markets dictate that businesses operate in very short time frames. E-commerce is changing how businesses connect to each other, value, both customer and shareholder, dominates corporate decisions and there is increased emphasis on sustainability, governance and the environment. At the same time lifestyle changes have increased the demand for flexibility, choice and lifelong learning opportunities at work.

    These changes parallel a shift from the factory system dominated by manufacturing to a rise of knowledge work. Knowledge workers and the rise of the new economy presents a significant challenge to existing organisational theory. Old notions of managing employees by controlling their behaviour are giving way to Critical Theory’s emphasis on relational management and leadership. A critical approach to evaluating existing theory can help to get beneath the surface and discover what is really going on. It can also be the starting point of sustainable improvement in the practice of management and leadership.

    This module adopts Critical Management Theory (CMS) to explore and evaluate current Western management and leadership practices.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module develops student’s knowledge and understanding of the main theories and policies of economic development. It examines; different perspectives on the meaning and definition of economic development, ethical issues involved, the role of the state and policies including trade and industrial policies, relationship between labour migration and economic development, the role of the international organizations in the formulation of development policy, and the relationship between economic growth and the environment. The module also provides a comparative analysis of economic performance among a selected number of developed and developing countries.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module is concerned with the application of economic concepts and theories to our understanding of the multinational business. Using economic theories, the module will explain the existence and development of the multinational business and examine some of the strategies used by multinational business to enter foreign markets. Other important issues in the operations of multinational businesses such as cultural diversity and human resource management will also be considered. The overall aim of the Module is to provide students with the theoretical knowledge and business strategies for analyzing the multinational business. As part of the teaching strategies, case studies will be used.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module introduces students to the fundamental aspects of international trade theories, commercial policies, open economy macroeconomics, and the international monetary system. The module will examine both theoretical and contemporary policy issues in the international economy.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module enables students to undertake a short period of professional activity and to gain credit for their achievements. The activity can be employment activity, a work placement, professional training, volunteering activity in the not-for-profit sector, or where available, within a Virtual Business Environment within the University.

    It is expected that the student should work for 140 hours, for which they will be required to provide evidence. The 140 hours can be completed in 20 working days in a full-time mode during the summer (where available), or spread over a semester in a part-time mode.

    Additionally, learners may in some cases be able to utilise their existing part-time / vacation employment providing they can demonstrate that it is personally developmental and involves a level of responsibility (decided upon submission of the role details by the Module Leader).

    The work based learning activity should enable the student to build on previous experiences and learning gained within their academic course and elsewhere. It should provide learning opportunities for personal development. The student is encouraged and supported in developing the ability to identify applied knowledge and skills that enhance their work performance, ensure their continued improvement and apply theory to practice as appropriate. The learner should develop improved understanding of themselves, and the workplace through reflective and reflexive learning.

    • Students will be contacted soon after they register for the module (e.g. June for those registered for October) to ensure they understand the requirements and are able to find suitable activity
    • The University must ensure that suitable health and safety requirements are in place and the work activity needs to be approved by the module team before they start the role. The suitability of the opportunities will be assessed on an individual basis.
    • Where required, students will be supported in finding suitable opportunities and with all aspects of their job search and applications. The Careers and Employability Team will work with School teams to provide this support. However, it is the students’ responsibility to obtain suitable employment, and roles cannot be guaranteed.
    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    The module is designed to develop student employability and increase graduate career prospects. The ‘sandwich placement’ year requires learners to undertake a minimum of 44 weeks full-time work in employment which is developmental and relates to their graduate career goals. Compulsory pre-placement preparation workshops will provide structured learning and support to assist students in their search for an appropriate placement in an industry relevant to their area of study; develop professionalism and the ability to transfer learning from the classroom and previous employment to the placement workplace. During the placement term, students will be supported in applying theoretical knowledge in a practical context, analysing business problems and proposing solutions, and identifying and articulating transferable skills and knowledge developed during the placement. Students will be expected to demonstrate improved understanding of their abilities and career goals, knowledge of the workplace organisation and professional awareness through reflective and reflexive learning.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module examines public economics. It covers the theoretical aspects of public economics, namely market failure, theories of public goods, externalities, asymmetric information, social choice, inequality, commodity and income taxation. It discusses applications of these concepts by covering selected topics in economics of health, energy, insurance and communication. Further, it covers some recent developments in public and welfare economics: economics of giving, altruism and reciprocity, economics of happiness, and social economics.

    Read full details.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

Year 1 modules include:

  • Principles of Economics
  • Globalisation and the Modern Corporation
  • Quantitative Methods for Economics
  • Accounting, Financial Markets and Institutions

Year 2 modules include:

  • Business Economics
  • Macroeconomics and the Global Economy
  • Empirical Methods for Economics and Finance
  • Economics of Digital Media (optional)
  • Economics and Ethics (optional)
  • The European Economy (optional)
  • Managing and Organising across Cultures (optional)
  • Regulation of Business Creations (optional)
  • Work Placement or Language (optional)

Year 3 modules include:

  • International Business Strategy and the Global Economy
  • Industrial Economics and Regulation or
  • Economics of Human Resources
  • Development Economics and Emerging Markets (optional)
  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Governance (optional)
  • Economics of Multinational Business (optional)
  • Work Placement or Language (optional)

In the 2013 National Student Survey, Business Economics got an overall satisfaction score of 95%, which was one of the highest in the sector.

In the 2013 National Student Survey, Business Economics got an overall satisfaction score of 95%, which was one of the highest in the sector.

A degree in business economics can give your career a major headstart. The skills acquired on our degrees are highly valued by employers, and economics graduates are among the highest paid graduates, according to a 2014 report published by the Sutton Trust.

A wide range of career opportunities are opened up by this course, such as working in international corporations, management, government, banking and finance, consultancy and research. You could also choose progress to postgraduate study. Some of our previous students have gone on to attend universities around the world such as Birkbeck in London and the University of Augsburg in Germany.

A work placement is available as an accredited option on the course. You'll work with our Placements and Employability Unit to find posts in financial, commercial and non-profit organisations.

You'll have the opportunity to study in leading European universities, including those in France, Sweden and the Netherlands, where teaching is in English.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

Undergraduate
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