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Textile Design - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

This degree course introduces you to a professional career in textiles. As a textiles student you'll acquire the technical skills for textile processes and experiment with non-traditional approaches, enabling you to design interiors, clothing and accessories. You’ll have numerous opportunities to enter competitions, visit industry and trade shows and exhibit your work. Some of our previous students have undertaken work placements at Alexander McQueen, Monsoon, Beyond Retro and the British Museum.

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months. In the National Student Survey 2016 this course scored an impressive 100% overall student satisfaction.

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In this department bubbling with creativity and energy you'll explore textile design for interiors, fashion and accessories, with opportunities to produce garments or a specialist fabric collection.

Our team includes professional textile artists, practitioners and designers, as well as fashion, interior and product designers, who lecture and mentor to support your learning.

After undertaking workshops in print, weave, knit and mixed media you'll go on to pursue specific interests and material specialisation through both studio and contextual study.

While experimenting with digital textile printing and laser cutting, as well as learning traditional techniques, you'll also have opportunities to collaborate with London Met students studying jewellery or fashion degrees across a wide range of projects.

As you progress, you'll gain an understanding of commercial, ethical and industry standards as you undertake projects and work placements, develop professionalism and establish networks to further your career.

The University has industry links with multinational companies such as Marks and Spencer and furniture retailer Ligne Roset, as well as local practitioners. You'll work with a diverse range of retailers, manufacturers and design studios on live projects, providing you with valuable experience of the textile industry.

You'll have opportunities to enter competitions, visit industry and trade shows both in the UK and overseas to exhibit your work, leading to a work-ready portfolio for your final year show.

The course provides you with regular feedback through tutorials to prepare you for your final assessment, ensuring you fully understand the criteria and the outcome objectives for your coursework. You'll also gain information and advice on working in the design industry to help you decide on your specialism and prepare you to enter the workplace.

There's considerable emphasis on the professional presentation of project ideas. During the course, you'll have the opportunity to develop your knowledge and understanding while working on real world creative briefs set by professional design bodies. This will prepare you to enter roles in textiles, fashion, interior design, retail, and journalism, among other related careers.

As the University’s external examiner explains, “The level of engagement with industry and preparation for the workplace, are notable strengths of the course.” Graduates have taken up roles with high street retailers such as River Island and gone on to establish independent design outlets and businesses.

Upon completion of the degree you could enter textile, fashion or interior design roles including designer-maker, industry designer, buyer, technologist, stylist and design journalist, or even progress on to a master’s course.

Assessment

You're assessed via project work and essays, individual and group design practice, and a final major show and dissertation.

Professional accreditation

We have established links with professional multi-national companies such as Marks & Spencer and Ligne Roset, securing placements and prizes for students whilst studying. We work with diverse retailers, manufacturers and design studios for live projects, providing valuable experience of the textile industry.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements,you will normally be expected to obtain:

  • for entry in the 2016-17 academic year: 280 or more UCAS points (or equivalent, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma) in relevant art and design subjects
  • for entry in the 2017-18 academic year: a minimum grade of BBC in three A levels in relevant art and design subjects (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National, OCR Diploma or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

We encourage applications from International/EU students with equivalent qualifications. We also accept mature students with diverse backgrounds and experiences.

Suitable applicants living in the UK will be invited to a portfolio interview. Applicants living outside the UK will be required to submit a portfolio of work via email.

If you do not have traditional qualifications or cannot meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing the Fashion and Textiles Extended Degree (with Foundation Year).

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    Successful 3D design outcomes are reliant on sound 3D design principles. These design principles inform and create opportunities for you to apply your creativity to the conception, development and eventual realisation of effective 3D design solutions.

    Three-dimensional design is intent on bringing about change, impacting on human experience. This module will introduce you to a range of contemporary and traditional discipline-related design approaches and processes, some of which will be tested in design exercises and some of which may be realised in studios and projects carried across other modules. You will be introduced to systems and methods of analysing 3D artefacts and material culture. Processes experienced will involve research, documentation and analysis, as well as play, accident and chance.

    Design concepts will be tested through the application of workshop and studio methods. Materials, processes and technologies will be discipline-specific, developing creative outcomes relevant to the possibilities and constraints of the context, the needs of the client and users, and industry conventions.

    You will be encouraged to develop a critically informed and personal approach to the process of design. Studios and projects will encourage you to understand your practice in the context of a rapidly changing contemporary culture with ever-developing needs and problems. Engaging with materials, media and, processes, you can become an agent of change through design practice.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces and develops a range of knowledge, skills and approaches in the research, sketching and communication of information and ideas for 3D disciplines and artefacts in visual form.

    The ability to draw and communicate visually for research, as well as design development, is critical to the success of a designer in any 3D discipline. This module intends to make development of subject specialist skills in these fields a central component of the courses that it serves.

    You will take part in a range of studios, workshops and lectures that introduce a wide range of traditional and contemporary drawing, visual research and communication media, methods and practices to help you explore, record, select from, analyse and interpret your environment and the world of images, spaces and artefacts for a range of purposes.

    Through the regular practice of a wide range of drawing methods, whether for the recording and communication of information, the generation of concepts and design or the expression of ideas, you will develop confidence and a key resource to support your practice.

    Discipline specific projects will explore the recording and expression of line, colour, form, structure, light, space and perspective, texture, detail and context appropriate to the requirements of your field in a range of media and formats.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The module offers a sequence of three intensive programmes or ‘mini-blocks’, tailored to the interests of specific groups of students. The module engages the student in thinking about their subject area, how it is defined and practiced, the richness of its resources, and how it opens up questions of context. In particular the module investigates how context might be framed, for example culturally, historically, economically, socially, theoretically or through practice. Students are encouraged to see connections and reflect on what they see in ways that build skills of communication and help articulate ideas. The module also helps the student, through learning how to identify, access and use knowledge profitably, to become knowledgeable about their subject area, its extent, its language and conventions, its history and practice.

    The three mini-blocks have equally weighted single assessments . The assessments include a range of different modes of written assignments, for example, Patchwork, Case Study, or Essay.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    Good design and high-quality artefacts are informed by knowledge of the potential and limitations of relevant technologies and techniques, materials and process. The focus of this module is on the development of understanding and abilities in a range of key practical skills and an understanding of material and process through experience, experimentation and direct observation.

    The module will introduce to you some of the key methods and principles of achieving high-quality outcomes, whether crafted, manufactured or constructed. It will develop your capacity for informed decision-making about material experimentation and process investigation through the exploration of why particular choices of material, technique, process and technology are made in relation to factors such as aesthetics, purpose, function, scale, economy, and ethical considerations.

    The module is taught within disciplinary specific studios, includes a range of relevant exercises and will aid realisation of designs and projects originated in other modules.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    As humans, we live in a continuous and ongoing relationship with the made world, where the former and the latter each inform the other. This module aims to investigate through design and physical realiation, how an understanding of human needs and desires, physical, psychological, sociological and economic, and of people as individuals and in society, can aid successful design.

    Informed selection and application of material processes are an intrinsic part of the design and production of both objects and the made environment and will be central to this module. However, understanding of material and process is not sufficient to ensure good design. Close observation and analysis of the interaction between people and their natural and designed environments will also be at the core of this area of study. You will discover and show how clear and detailed understanding of these relationships is vital to relevant, safe and ethical, innovative and viable design that responds to real needs. Your response might be in the field of critical or narrative design that fosters debate and emotional reward, or it might be focused on user-centred design, environmentally secure manufacturing, or system/ service design. In any of these cases you will be expected to understand and show how your design work and its outcomes are the result of credible research, and how it relates to users, (both principal and incidental), in practice.

    Workshop activities will explore and test ideas, resolving design issues and proposing solutions through modelling in traditional and digital materials and technologies. Material experimentation and knowledge will enhance both the concept and its communication.

    You will normally select from a range of studio projects, working with contemporary ideas and practising designers, mentored by professional practices as appropriate to the project.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    The module offers a sequence of three intensive programmes or ‘mini-blocks’ tailored to the interests of specific groups of students. It provides a range of studies that address the character and conditions of cultural production including how they operate in practice. The module helps to prepare the student for their final-year dissertation and their future role as professionals and practitioners. The student encounters different perspectives on their subject area and undertakes different forms of coursework aimed at helping inform their choice of dissertation topic and approach.

    The module begins to situate the student within the process of constructing knowledge. This process may be approached from the point of view of the producer or consumer, the critic or the professional, the academic or the practitioner, in that there are a number of players involved. The module recognises that the student is also an active player in the process: what they bring to the construction of knowledge counts; and how effectively they construct it depends on how well they understand and interact with the field. To this end the module encourages the skills of reading and literacy as required – historical, analytical, textual, visual or technical – to help support rigorous and enterprising thought.

    The three blocks have equally weighted single assessments.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Design resolution ensures a confident and complex realisation of your design concepts. Materiality (form, colour, surface and texture) affects meaning and value in all design. This module requires your critical attention to subtle and implicit design details, expressed through materials, aesthetics and construction, considering how material and production selection, manipulation and application inscribes quality and value onto the final resolution of the artefact.

    You will explore artefact and material representation and resolution, drawing on concepts and ideas originally generated within the studio. Outcomes will be developed through applied media, material and/ or constructional experimentation including full-scale outcomes or working prototypes. You will realise relevant design solutions for studio briefs, in response to specific end-users and/or sites.

    Through in-depth practice-led research, you will consider the social, functional and environmental impacts of products, samples, material choices and the performance of these upon designed outcomes and their users.
    You will learn to work to a high level of professional presentation. You will develop a logical and creative approach to design problem solving, appropriate to the needs of users and clients.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    Consumers today, demand products with superior ethical and environmental values and will do so increasingly in the future, as our shared environment becomes more stressed. Corporate ethical and environmental requirements mirror this, often in response to governmental legislation. There is a need for intelligent and sustainable exploitation of finite materials and processes. Professional ethics, social enterprise and entrepreneurial strategies produce creative solutions.

    This module enables you to bring together your knowledge and experience of material and making to achieve investigation, invention and discovery. Taking material and the processes, techniques, and tools or equipment through which it is manipulated as your starting point, you study how craft, design, science, technology, manufacturing and engineering debate the benefits of traditional, rediscovered, new and emerging material and process technologies in relation to real-world needs. You will research ‘in action’, seeking solutions to the unexpected possibilities and meanings revealed by experimentation.

    The module introduces specialist methods, terms and techniques that are used to commission, specify and evaluate making. It examines how and why regulatory, professional and ethical standards are developed as well as the remit for research and experimentation. The module further expands the knowledge of materials, production, consumer standards and professional requirements, with particular attention given to longevity and sustainability underpinning ethical values and responsibilities relevant to the design of fashion, textiles, jewellery, furniture and/or product.

    During the module, you will practice and develop your understanding of professional dissemination. The moment of submission also provides critical debate and reception, commercial response, and career development. Very often, a designer will have to convince potential clients of the merits of their proposal without the benefit of a market-ready model, making convincing presentation a vital tool to securing the next stage. You will research and develop your discipline’s professional requirements for public/ commercial reception.

    Developing skills in the use of image, text, word & object to communicate complex and conceptual/ critical thinking, you will practice codes and conventions of presentation, publication and exhibition relevant to your field. You will be expected to investigate and develop critical and aesthetic working relationships between and across your modules, fuelling your enthusiasm and individual approach to your study.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Together with the Major Project Realisation module, this module is intended to prepare 3D Design students for independent practice, entry into the professional workplace, or for higher studies.

    Through synthesis of knowledge of processes and principles, using an appropriate range of intellectual, creative and practical skills, you will design and develop a self-directed project, relevant to your discipline. This will naturally require in-depth research, a well-constructed design & making process, and the exercise of practical and thinking skills, resulting in a significant body of creative work for public exhibition.

    A negotiated and approved proposal will confirm your individual project. Using creative exploration and experimentation, you will develop research, concept development, material investigation, sampling, modelling or prototyping and visualisation. The final outcome will be produced in Major Project Realisation.

    The module will ensure that you critique and reflect upon your own work, the professional standards of your discipline and your position in your creative sector. The module emphasizes self-direction and personal focus whilst acknowledging external and professional expectations and constraints.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module is framed in terms of a dissertation. The student undertakes an enquiry into a topic of his or her own choice and, based on this enquiry, develops an extended critical study. The module involves individual supervision designed to support the student’s ambitions and confidence in becoming an independent learner, building on techniques and knowledge developed in previous years, and providing scope for initiative and development. The dissertation demonstrates the student’s ability to thoroughly research a topic, use appropriate methods of investigation, and work methodically and productively.

    The subject matter of the dissertation can be theoretical, technical, or historical, should be closely related to the student’s main field of study and be complimentary to their practice. It may be envisaged as one of several different types: for example, visual, technical or other non-written material may form the subject of the enquiry and comprise an integral part of the whole; the dissertation may be professionally oriented and include field-work; or it might be academic and theoretical in its source material and methodology. Its form and approach can reflect a broad range of discipline-specific approaches based on discussion and agreement with the supervisor and/or course leader.

    Students may develop their topic independently or, as an option, within a specific dissertation Interest or Subject Group. Interest or Subject Groups will provide a short taught programme. They are offered on an annual basis and may incorporate:

    • research based specialisms
    • areas of scholarly interest in history and theory
    • industry related practice
    • workshop, digital or media based technical studies

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    For many creative practitioners, competition entry or exhibition are the crucial, final aspects of professional dissemination and practice: a fulfilment of practice objectives – aesthetic, intellectual, ethical ¬– and the realisation of a long period of research and development in the studio. The moment of submission also provides critical debate and reception, commercial reward, and future career opportunities.

    This module requires you to undertake a researched, targeted exhibition or competition entry, presenting work (developed within your major project) in a professional manner, for public reception. You will apply your understanding of the codes and conventions of competition or exhibition, contemporary curatorial practice, editorial and competitor approaches within a public exhibition. This will represent your independent critical questioning of academic learning and professional processes.

    The module demands a creative and disciplined approach to collaboration with relevant stakeholders and external partners. You may prepare for professional practice and understanding and participation in exhibition and competition through work placement in a suitable company. This module develops your ‘learning for work’. Within the module, you will experience work-related learning through live project set up and realisation or placement. You will refine a range of transferable skills in communication, management, research and analysis and are encouraged to reflect and report on the work-relevant skills you develop throughout. These skills are both desirable and advantageous for all graduates and include (for example): action planning, contribution to professional meetings, entrepreneurship, goal setting, negotiating, networking, project management, self-appraisal, team working.

    Projects will develop and display effective professional presentation techniques and curatorial approaches for the dissemination of individual practice in live industry specific contexts. The final presentation should reflect your professional, creative and intellectual identity in preparation for entry to the workplace. The exhibition or competition entry or outcome of placement may be individual or as part of a collaborative venture.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This Major Project module enables Textile Design students to prepare for independent practice in the workplace or to progress onto higher studies. In this module, you will carry out the project conceived and developed in the parallel Project Design and Development module (DN6001), fully realising it in appropriate physical form by the end of the module.

    You will exercise and display your abilities in selecting, analysing and applying knowledge, skills and understanding to a negotiated and fully researched project in order to properly understand your strengths, interests and position in your field, and the potential for your future professional development.

    You will show that you understand the complex and changing nature of problems in the professional discipline of textile design and can devise and apply realistic strategies for constructing, applying and managing a process designed to provide solutions.

    A professional standard of realisation, contextualisation and presentation will be expected, providing the elements for a portfolio of practice with which you may enter the field of employment or self employment or further studies.

    Read full details.

If you're studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

Year 1 (Level 4) modules include:

  • Visual Research and Communication
  • Design Principles
  • Critical and Contextual Studies 1
  • Workshop Practice

Year 2 (Level 5) modules include:

  • Creative Industry Practice
  • Narrative or Human Scale
  • Critical and Contextual Studies 2
  • Design Details

Year 3 (Level 6) modules include:

  • Major Project Realization
  • Project and Design Development
  • Research Methods & Dissertation
  • Work Placement & the Entrepreneur or Design Competition

“The difference between London Met and many other universities is the focus on post-graduation employment. There is a great emphasis on practical skills for the workplace and the importance of workshops and hands-on experience."
National Student Survey

"Art and design based modules run alongside business studies to help us as upcoming designers, understand the real working world. The highlight of my experience at London Met was the live project that we undertook with Marks & Spencer. Not only was this an incredible experience at the time, but by maintaining this connection I was employed by M&S a few short months after my studies ended. It is this approach to practical skills and focus on careers that London Met should be commended for.”
National Student Survey

“Studio culture has transformed the experience for me. I really appreciate the chance to explore what my practice may be when I graduate. Teaching staff have been excellent, giving me just enough freedom to explore, but not so much that I get lost! Excellent facilities. Excellent technicians.”
National Student Survey

“The work placement is excellent. The study visits are good for bonding and learning, and tutors have good contacts with the industry. My time at London Met on the textile design course was brilliant! I was so stimulated and enriched by the projects and seminars. It not only taught me in-depth textile knowledge but also key life skills and a lot about myself. The teachers are open minded and supportive, always looking for new ways to help you achieve your potential and bring out your creativity."
National Student Survey

"The best thing for me was the variety of subjects you could study. I even tried my hand at textile jewellery designing which I loved! I enjoyed my time and experiences at London Met so much that I applied to do a postgraduate course there!”
National Student Survey

Our graduates have gone on to work at companies including Timberland, Harrods, the Fashion Model Directory and River Island.

London Met textile design student Majeda Clarke was shortlisted for a Bemz Design Award and went on to create her latest collection with UNESCO

Other roles include self-employed designer-maker, industrial designer, buyer, technologist and stylist, or you could consider progressing to a master’s in your field.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

If you have a question about the course, please contact Gina Pierce: g.pierce@londonmet.ac.uk

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2016 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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