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International Relations and Law - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

Explore how law and international relations interrelate and how to use your legal knowledge in an international, diplomatic and political context. This degree specialises in two disciplines, increasing your career prospects with transferable skills and opportunities for work placements and study in European and American universities. With its expert staff and extensive resources, this course appeals to students from across the world.

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On this degree you’ll examine ideological and ethical questions about international relations as well as legal debates and policies, and have the opportunity to look at terrorism, the environment, poverty, nuclear proliferation, religion, human rights, cyber warfare, intelligence and the complex relationships between states.

You’ll develop the capacity to think critically about events, ideas and institutions in a research culture that promotes academic inquiry and debate, and in your second and third year, you’ll be able to pursue your own areas of interest including power politics, foreign policy analysis, regional studies, security studies and the impact of globalisation.

Taught by expert staff with extensive experience, this degree appeals to students both in the UK and overseas. You’ll enjoy regular lectures and presentations from practitioners such as Supreme Court judges, diplomats and politicians, and access to the opportunities that London offers such as visits to embassies, courts and the Houses of Parliament.

There’s a strong emphasis on developing the essential skills sought by employers. This is achieved through targeted teaching sessions and hands-on experience, and the exciting opportunity to undertake a work placement in the final year. In previous years, students have undertaken placements with the European Union, the United Nations, aid agencies, think-tanks and embassies. It’s also possible to spend part of the course studying in another European country or the USA.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed through essays, exams, presentations, individual and group research projects, briefing papers, portfolios, reflective writing and a final year dissertation or work placement.

Professional accreditation

This is not a qualifying law degree for professional legal training. Please see our LLB Law or LLB (with International Relations) courses which are qualifying law degrees.

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum grade BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification eg, Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSEs at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate access or other preparatory courses or who have appropriate work experience.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

Accelerated study

If you have relevant qualifications or credit from a similar course it may be possible to enter this course at an advanced stage rather than beginning in the first year. Please note, advanced entry is only available for September start. See our information for students applying for advanced entry.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Friday morning

    Contract Law is a thirty week module providing students with a thorough understanding of contract law. As well as studying the traditional principles of offer, acceptance, consideration and third party rights, students will also consider other such practical topics as remedies, misrepresentation, frustration, restitution and exclusion clauses in contract. The subject is essential for all business, commercial and consumer interests. Assessment is via a combination of coursework and seminar participation. The module is relevant and very important for a range of careers in law, commerce and industry.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Thursday afternoon

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the study of International Relations as an academic discipline. It identifies the key actors in international relations and examines how these have changed or been threatened by the forces of globalisation. It also considers the historical context of international relations in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries and demonstrates the challenges that globalisation poses to the structures and processes of world politics. In particular, students will explore issues as diverse as the development of the Westphalian system, North-South tensions, the international political economy, theoretical approaches to international relations, and international security dilemmas, such as terrorism, nuclear proliferation, the clash of cultures, poverty, human rights, the role of gender, and the environment. At the end of the module students should be able to make informed judgements about current international affairs – and future developments.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Thursday morning

    Legal Systems comprises an introduction to English Legal Systems in historical and international context. It includes basic outline of sources of law, law making process, institutional and court structure and legal actors within the English Legal system together with consideration of international and comparative models of law and basic legal theory.

    To successfully transact Legal Systems requires students to locate legal material, read and understand primary and secondary legal material and recognise and develop at an introductory level the basic legal skills of preparation, representation and advocacy required of professionals or successful actors within legal systems.

    The module (30 credits) will run for 30 weeks to year 1 (level 4) students. It will be delivered by way of a flexible programme of lectures, seminars, workshops and external activities (court visits and other appropriate legal forum or institution) supplemented by online (WebLearn) support.

    There are no prerequisites. Assessment will be by portfolio arising from class based exercises (40%) and a problem based exercise (60%)

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday afternoon

    This module examines the sources and changing nature of conflicts since 1945, at the global, regional and sub-national levels, and the attempts to resolve them through negotiation, mediation and economic and political integration. It introduces students to the main concepts in diplomatic and peace and conflict studies and provides them with a grounding in the evolving nature of conflicts since the end of World War II as well as the comparative analysis of those conflicts.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    One of the main objectives of the discipline of International Relations is to explain the behaviour of states in the international system. The main goal of this module, therefore, is to better understand the practice of foreign policy through the use of theory. The emphasis is conceptual – and the focus is on interdisciplinary theories of human and state behaviour applied to the study of foreign policy. The Module explores the theoretical core of International Relations and it outlines the different perspectives which can be used to understand the dynamics of the international system and the manner in whcih states orientate their foreign policy decisions.

    In examining the historical development of these different theoretical approaches students will be faced with complex questions about key concepts in the study of International Relations and state behaviour. This module encourages students to question the nature of the relations between states, the domestic / international divide and the relationships between theory and practice.

    The discipline of International Relations has come under criticism for its traditional focus on power and conflict, and this module investigates both the “orthodox” theories and the “new approaches” with a view to establishing the relevance of theory in the arena of contemporary foreign policy making.

    In addition to this the module recognises that students often have difficulty in distinguishing between methods to social enquiry and theories of IR and foreign policy. Consequently, one of the goals will be to encourage students to reflect on the important distinctions between methodology and theory.

    Please note: This module supersedes GI2002/GI2013

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) and core LLB unit provides a detailed understanding of the underlying concepts principles of EU law and its ever evolving relationship to domestic law. It considers the law-making powers of the EU institutions, the constitutional principles of the EU, and the role of the European Court of Justice. It highlights the interplay between these features by focusing on substantive EU topics such as the freedom of movement of goods, services and persons, and EU Competition law. It also explores the developing concept of EU citizenship and examines the promotion and protection of human rights within the EU. The topic is hugely important for a range of employers for example, businesses, State bodies, the legal profession, the Civil Service, NGOs, and policy makers.

    This new year long (30 week) module is a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) module, and the choice of content is intended to include the key legal knowledge and materials in the subject area required by the Joint Academic Standards Board for Law. Assessment is by a combination of examination, coursework, and diagnostic/SAT style tests.

    This completely new module has also presented the module team with the opportunity to introduce new material and perspectives by reorganising and rethinking the module content and delivery to incorporate the university’s goal of developing blended learning, students' study responsibilities and employability.

    The module introduces a range of blended learning initiatives as a proactive response to the development of the university’s policy of technology enhances learning. For example, online office hours, online formative assessment submission, and new learning tools using library resources will be in place. The module will also seek to encourage and develop student learning autonomy and independent learning skills by establishing self-directed learning requirements in the diagnostic/SAT style testing assessment component and in the individual oral presentation formative assessment component. The module’s focus on employability fosters an appreciation and understanding of the use of SAT style tests for job recruitment in the area of employment in the organizations that work in the area of EU law such as the UK and EU Civil Services. There is also a lecture on working in such institutions. The oral presentation formative assessment component (along with the tutorials themselves) seeks to develop oral communication and legal presentation skills.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module enables students to undertake a short period of career-related learning activity as part of their degree programme and to gain credit for their achievements. The activity may be for example current or previous employment activity, a placement, professional training, volunteering activity in the not-for-profit sector or elsewhere, or where available, within a virtual business environment or elsewhere within the University.

    It is expected that the student should work/train or volunteer for 70 hours, for which they will be required to provide evidence. The 70 hours can be completed in 10 working days in a full-time or part-time mode during a vacation (where available), or spread over up to a semester in a part-time mode.

    Additionally, learners may be able to utilise their existing or previous part-time/vacation employment, training or volunteering activity experience providing they can demonstrate that it is or has been personally developmental and involves a level of responsibility (decided upon submission of the role details by the Module Leader).

    The career related learning activity should enable the student to build on previous experiences and learning gained within their degree course and elsewhere. It should provide learning opportunities for personal development. The student is encouraged and supported in developing the ability to identify applied knowledge and skills that enhance their potential career performance, ensure their continued improvement and apply theory to practice as appropriate. The learner should develop improved understanding of themselves, and the workplace through reflective and reflexive learning.

    • Students will be contacted soon after they register for the module (e.g. June for those registered for the forthcoming academic year) to ensure they understand the requirements and are able to find suitable activity.
    • The career related activity needs to be approved by the module team before they start the role. The suitability of the opportunities will be assessed on an individual basis.
    • Where required, students will be supported in finding suitable opportunities and with all aspects of their activity search and applications. The Careers and Employability Team will work with Faculty teams to provide this support. However, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain suitable employment/training or volunteering career related learning activity, and roles cannot be guaranteed.
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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday morning

    This module is designed to acquaint students with the constitutional, institutional, and political frameworks within which contemporary foreign policies of the United States of America are formulated and executed. It allows students to understand the American foreign policy process by studying the USA’s role in several international issue areas. The module explores the role that global issues play in contemporary American foreign policy, in so doing illustrating the complexities and difficulties faced by US decision makers as they formulate and implement foreign policy.

    The module begins with a survey of the American foreign policy process. Topics examined include: international political forces; the Presidency and Congress; democracy, bureaucracy and national security; interest groups; public opinion; and the media. Subsequent sections of the module examine: the role of power and force in today’s world; the challenges to American power from economic globalisation; human rights and the role of moral principles in American foreign policy; the debate surrounding multilateral and unilateral foreign policies; and the future of American foreign policy in the 21st century.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday morning

    This module examines the structure, values and operation of the US government, including all its principles of exceptionalism, the major institutions and key actors. It examines the policy-making process, electoral politics and the roles of interest groups and the media. It also looks at some major areas of controversy within American politics, such as political ethics, gun control, healthcare (Obamacare), and race and immigration.

    In the wake of the election of the property-tycoon and celebrity Donald Trump as the President in 2016, it considers the impact of the celebrity politician, social media and cyber-activity in US political life.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module explores the practice of modern diplomacy. The first half of the module explores the historical emergence and evolution of diplomacy and the classic texts of diplomatic theory, before going on to concentrate on the roles and functions of traditional diplomatic institutions, systems and processes, such as embassies, foreign ministries, diplomatic services and international organisations.

    The second half of the module explores the main challenges posed to diplomatic practice by global change in recent decades: the rise of inclusive multilateral diplomacy in the UN and other fora; the increasing importance of non-state actors in contemporary diplomacy; the impact of faster air travel enabling leaders to conduct their own diplomacy; the revolution in information and communications technology; and innovations in diplomatic institutions (such as the emergence of the European External Action Service).

    A key theme running through the whole module is the evolving nature of international negotiation, which will be illustrated through detailed case studies of environmental, security and trade diplomacy.

    This is a highly practical module. Students will have opportunities to develop their ability to blog and use Twitter, engage in simulated negotiations and interact with practitioners through visits to embassies and other institutions and/or practitioner classes.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module provides an introduction to the law of evidence and to legal advocacy skills. It will concentrate upon the main concepts and principles of evidence law and explore their application by the advocate in the courtroom.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module critically examines the nature of governance, public policy and public management at sub-national; national; supranational and international levels. It looks in detail at the key elements of policy making; the role of policy makers; the instruments of policy; and how policies are implemented and managed. It explores the nature, extent and influence of globalisation and its relationship with public policy. It analyses the significance of multi-level governance and examines constitutional changes that have occurred in Britain since 1997 such as devolution to the Celtic periphery. It proceeds to outline the development of the European Union and assesses the impact of the supranational tier of governance. It then looks at substantive areas of public policy including immigration, citizenship and identity; economic policy; environment policy; and international policy. It investigates recent developments in public policy. The module proceeds to explore the implementation and management of public policy in contemporary public services and how they are changing. The pressures for change are elucidated, as are differing forms of service delivery such as decentralisation and contracting. Attempts to improve the quality of public services through initiatives such as Best Value and performance measurement in government are evaluated. As are mechanisms deployed to engage citizens or service users in the process of service design and delivery. The module moves on to assess strategic management and New Public Management. It concludes with a critical review of governance, public policy and public management in the twenty first century. Employability will be an ongoing theme throughout the module.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    A general introduction and overview of the framework of accountability for medical accidents and an examination of the different factors that shape such accountability i.e. legal, moral, ethical, scientific, and philosophical issues.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module examines theories of peace and conflict, and explores the key debates and works of the leading authors on these subjects. It relates these theories to the dynamics of conflict in the contemporary world, with an emphasis on institutions and organisations working for peace and environmental protection. It analyses the objectives and methods of particular organisations, focusing on their policies, practices and theoretical approaches. The module also provides an introduction to the core practical skills considered essential for anyone working in the fields of conflict prevention, mediation, crisis management, peacebuilding or protecting the environment, as well as the dilemmas they frequently face.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module explores the changing nature of relationships within and among societies both in the ‘North’ and the ‘global south’ from a multidisciplinary perspective. It focuses on contemporary approaches to global and grass-root movements and their strategy-trends in a variety of cultural and political contexts. Case studies of social movements, their development, expression and impact will form the basis for analysis. Themes include indigenous rights, gender and democracy, food sovereignty, international migration and economic power.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    In the first decade of the 21st century, the affairs of the Middle East continue to engage a great deal of international attention. Focusing primarily on the Arab Middle East, Israel and the Gulf region, the module concentrates on the internal dynamics of this strategic region, and the external forces affecting it. Students will be expected to analyse how the states of the region relate to each other, and comprehend how political change has been shaped by the interaction between nationalist, religious and political forces.

    The module will explore in detail the evolution of societies and polities in the contemporary Middle East. Taking both a theoretical and empirical approach it offers an opportunity to examine some of the different ways in which politics operates in this part of the world.

    Please note: This module supersedes GI2041C

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces and builds legal concepts regarding the ownership of land and the control of assets, including trusts and examines the law relating to co-ownership of land. It examines the system of registered title (from pre 1925) in the form of registered and unregistered land. Rules relating to the transfer of title will be examined as well as controls on land use. Leases, licences, mortgages, easements, restrictive freehold covenants, adverse possession, conveyancing, human rights and torts relating to property will likewise be examined. It also aims to develop students’ skills in legal research in a variety of sources. Student employability will be enhanced by the development of analytical skills, written and oral communication skills and group participation skills.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module provides a contextual introduction to the central areas of UK public law. First, it provides an introduction to the principles and practice relating to the legal foundations of the constitution. Second, it considers the principles of administrative law with particular reference to judicial review and other non-legal remedies available to the citizen.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module will examine how the nature of power in international relations has changed since the ending of the Cold War. The collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s was argued by many to be a triumph of the West’s military and industrial might, ushering in what Francis Fukuyama described as the ‘end of history’ – the triumph of western liberal democratic ideas. However, events since then, not least the attacks of 9/11 and the economic collapse of 2008, have highlighted new threats that exist, the increasing role of non-state actors, and the rise of competing economic powers. Using the framework first put forward by Joseph Nye of “soft”, “hard” and now “smart power”, this module will examine how international politics is changing and how the nature of power - defined as the ability to affect others to obtain the outcomes you want - has changed dramatically. It will show that power is not static, but that it may now be more complex in nature, as innovation, technologies and relationships change.

    This theoretical approach will then be applied to consider how power may be shifting in the 21st Century from the West to the East, or the so-called “Rest”. This will involve a regional analysis, examining how and why some states are rising in global prominence, e.g. China, Brazil, India, and South Africa, and why the West may (or may not) be in decline (incorporating European and American specialisms). This will allow for a consideration of the growing role of underdeveloped and developing countries and the challenges they face in the current distribution of power, particularly within the turbulent international political economy and the global transformations that are occurring.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module examines both the theory and practice of strategy. Combining an historical and contemporary approach, it explores how strategy has moved beyond the traditional approach, which concentrated on wars and military campaigns, to focus on a broader definition, embracing such developments as political strategy (for example, election or civil disobedience strategies).

    As well as studying key texts on strategy, such as Sun-tzu and Carl von Clausewitz, and the more recent work of writers such as Lawrence Freedman, a prominent part of the module throughout will involve examining significant case studies. This will encourage students to think as both theorists and practitioners.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module will examine the historical origins, political dynamics and policy output of the European Union. It focuses on the reasons for the EU’s establishment, the nature of its politics and its principal policy activities.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module provides an overview of the practical position of women under English law, with an examination of the theoretical issues underpinning that position. As an extension of learning module, it is suitable for students from any discipline with an interest in gender and the law.

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Since the late 1980s, the implications of globalisation – economic, cultural, political, and technological – have become central to our understanding of international relations. The end of the Cold War initially brought widespread hopes for (1) enhanced international co-operation between both state and non-state actors, as well as (2) fresh commitment to strengthening the role of international organisations, especially the United Nations. These developments would, it was hoped, facilitate attempts to address a range of what were widely perceived to be issues with global relevance, including: economic and social injustices, armed conflicts, international terrorism, an increasing world population, human rights abuses, and environmental degradation.

    The rise of these new, often non-military issues, has challenged existing concepts of international security, and highlighted how this and the multifaceted processes of globalisation are interlinked.

    Clearly, assessment of so broad and abstract a collection of concepts is a difficult task. Nevertheless, to investigate the possibility that contemporary globalisation refers to qualitatively different global processes and relationships that have not existed before, the module examines factors which might constitute a new phase in International Relations and, by implication, International Security. There are clearly many problems facing the world community that must be solved by a means of a different set of policies, but the one thing they all have in common is that they are now all a function of security and therefore cannot be ignored.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    International law is increasingly important to states, organisations and individuals, and impacts on every aspect of modern life.
    This 30 credit module will provide students with a thorough knowledge of the key concepts of international law such as the sources of international law, the definition of statehood, the principle of self-determination, states’ acquisition of title to territory and jurisdiction over territory and people, state responsibility for unlawful acts, and states’ use of force. Students will also be given a solid grasp of some key areas of substantive law such as Law of the Sea and other topical areas.
    Knowledge of the key principles and substantive topics will be matched with understanding of the operation of international law in the real world. Students will be encouraged to approach the subject critically and to develop their analytic skills to the highest level.
    The module will introduce students to the current debates and challenges in this subject, with a focus on topical examples which will bring the subject to life and motivate students to explore the subject more fully.
    Teaching will be by a combination of lecture, seminar (academic discussion) and workshop (developing academic and transferable skills such as critical thinking and oral and written communication skills).
    Assessment is by a combination of examination and coursework essay.
    The module will be of interest to all students who take an interest in current affairs, international relations, the international order, international peace and security.
    The module is relevant to a wide range of careers in law, government, politics, international relations, the media, and international business.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module examines issues and controversies in Law and exposes students to contemporary legal issues. Students are able to research a subject of their choice in detail and will be required to explore their personal development plan in the context of future career direction. The module will further develop students’ abilities to research a legal topic, interpret and analyse information and evaluate their findings in the context of the contemporary environment. It draws upon students’ knowledge, understanding and skills developed in earlier modules, allowing students to carry out in-depth research into a topic of their choosing.

    Students will also be directed as to appropriate research methodologies. Staff teaching on the module will also provide an overview of a number of contemporary legal issues as well as enabling students to develop effective strategies for dealing with their future career directions.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The module requires the students to undertake a detailed, critical investigation into a contentious legal topic; the investigation is structured, so that students are required to formulate a research proposal at the outset; engage with regular supervision throughout the process; and produce at the end a reflective statement describing and evaluating the experience of their research and of their undergraduate studies generally

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This core module offers students the opportunity to undertake a work placement for an employer that has a PIR role, enabling students directly to experience and observe operational practicalities of institutions that they have studied from an academic/theoretical perspective. In the process students will enhance their future employability. Students produce a report on their placement; design a research proposal on a topic related to the employer’s role; undertake the relevant research; and write up the findings in dissertation form.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) afternoon

    This core module offers students the opportunity to undertake a work placement for an employer that has a PIR role, enabling students directly to experience and observe operational practicalities of institutions that they have studied from an academic/theoretical perspective. In the process students will enhance their future employability. Students produce a report on their placement; design a research proposal on a topic related to the employer’s role; undertake the relevant research; and write up the findings in dissertation form.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester afternoon

    For this module students must design a research project relevant to their PIR degree programme, undertake the relevant research and write up the findings in a dissertation. They also write a report on the research process.

    Research Skills and Employability will be an on-going theme throughout the module.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) afternoon

    For this module students must design a research project relevant to their PIR degree programme, undertake the relevant research and write up the findings in a dissertation. They also write a report on the research process.
    Research Skills and Employability will be an on-going theme throughout the module.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The Work Placement for Professional Experience module provides students with an opportunity to experience working in a legal context, to develop the skills and abilities necessary for a graduate career, to identify their strengths and weaknesses and how they might improve their performance, and to apply theoretical legal knowledge to cases in the real world.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    A politics grounded in interests other than the traditional geographic and class concern is increasingly prevalent, with sex/gender playing a growing role in political identity. On the one hand, women’s political participation has become an important issue internationally with increasing numbers of women elected to positions of leadership and heading governmental and non-governmental organisations. On the other hand, gendered issues and issues of gender have become increasingly political. Overtly: state intervention in reproduction and control of marriage and divorce as well as equality of treatment by and within state institutions continue to be of concern; covertly: conservative, xenophobic and neo-liberal austerity policies have gendered implications as traditional roles for men and women are re-asserted or assumed.
    This module covers both theoretical and empirical approaches. It starts by considering the background to the enfranchisement of women and theories of equality and rights; moves on to investigate political practices including elections, representation, policy-making and women’s movements; followed by in-depth discussion of particular issues including the feminisation of poverty, gender and democratisation; women and security, and gendered violence.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module looks at the alleged ‘crisis’ in contemporary Africa, focusing on problems of economic, social and political development. This module aims to challenge assumptions about the problems of contemporary Africa by examining these problems in detail and by looking at Africa’s place in the world.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module will give a clear and coherent up to date account of the law of human rights and civil liberties concentrating on the position of civil liberties and human rights protection in the light of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the standards of human rights protection laid down in the European Convention of Human Rights.

    The student will be introduced to the scope of civil liberties and human rights and the machinery to redress and breaches of those rights. The student will also focus on the relationship between the individual and the state in terms of specific individual rights and freedoms.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module introduces students to Company law and will include the formation, constitution and management of companies together with share issue, share capital, loan capital and selected aspects of insolvency law.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module examines a range of approaches to the cessation of contemporary conflicts and the creation of peaceful, productive conditions for interethnic and international cooperation, using case studies as a basis for discussion and analysis. It explores both the theory and practice of conflict resolution and peacebuilding, including liberal and critical approaches. Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills of independent research through an analysis of a case study of a contemporary conflict and efforts to achieve its resolution.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    An overview of Environmental Law at the level of Domestic, International and European Law and a critical examination of the policy upon which it based .

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module will provide a historical and critical introduction to ideas and institutions of human rights and will evaluate their relationship with state sovereignty and international conflict.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module explores the philosophy, history and political practice of social justice and of international human rights.

    Please note: This module supersedes GI3047

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module provides students with an understanding of immigration law and the various categories of the law. This will involve a study of the rules relating to temporary admissions, settlement, deportation, illegal entry, removal, and of course asylum. Students will also gain an understanding of Asylum and Immigration Tribunal Chamber. They will be expected to attend hearings at the Tribunal during the course of the term.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module offers an examination of some of the principal challenges of Latin American societies and states today. Case studies illustrate aspects relative to national ‘arrangements’ (leadership, political institutions, political participation, political identities and economic and social integration), these in the presence of the US and the increasing importance of regional and extra-regional relations as well as global concerns for the environment, migration, poverty, indigenous and gender relations.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    Whilst some commentators at the end of the 20th century adopted the view that ‘God is dead’ and that religion no longer had a role to play in society that view has changed. Increasingly religion is becoming an important issue. There are arguments about the role of religion in public life. There are conversations about religious schools and religious clothing. There are discussions about religious courts and whether modern legal disputes can be settled by religious law. Attitudes towards religion have arguably progressed from tolerance to the promotion of religious liberty as a right. New laws have been enacted, interpreted and administered. Have these new laws increased the protection given to religious individuals and groups? How have new laws interacted with older laws concerning religion? ‘Law and religion’ possesses the ‘academic credibility, intellectual substance and appropriateness of subject matter’ to be treated as an academic sub-discipline. There is a clear area of study. It is accepted as ‘applied law’ rather than ‘theoretical’ law and is concerned with the recognition and regulation of religious activities. Law and religion is also concerned with the study of religious law; the interaction of civil and criminal law with religion; religious freedom as a human right; the legal position of religious groups; legal definitions of religion; recognition and enforcement of religious law. This module will be of interest to those students wishing to embark on careers in law, the community or social sector, education, central or local government or with regulators or professional bodies. It will be of interest to any student who wishes to develop an understanding of the relationship between law and religion and law and society at large.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This cutting-edge module explores one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields of contemporary diplomatic studies and an area which has seen a wide variety of innovations in state practice in recent years. As public opinion has come to be seen as increasingly influential and important in world politics, states and other international actors have rediscovered public and cultural diplomacy, a form of diplomatic practice in which states engage with publics both abroad and at home. Due to changes in global communications, this form of diplomacy is undergoing rapid change, which makes it especially interesting and important.
    The module examines the changing nature of public and cultural diplomacy in the context of the evolution of global political communications. It explores the nature of international political communication, evaluating key concepts such as propaganda, place branding and strategic communications, and examines the role of culture in world politics more broadly, including media such as film and the internet, as well as key actors such as celebrity diplomats. It explores competing definitions and interpretations of public and cultural diplomacy, along with how their practice has changed in recent decades, especially since the end of the Cold War.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    Companies and Governments frequently need to raise money from Individuals and organisations to fund their activities This module is intended to provide students with a lawyer’s perspective and understanding of the financial and taxation systems and the significance of fiscal policy. The module will introduce students to taxation, investment, financial markets and transactions and examine how core legal concepts are applied in practical contexts. Students will analyse the regulatory and legal framework, the relationship between substantive law and financial regulation, questions of law and risk in financial markets, the legal aspects of taxation, banking, lending, securities and derivatives activity, and the legal and regulatory context of financial market failures. Consideration will also be given to the interplay between law and ethics within the realms of finance.

    In light of the central role that finance and taxation plays in the economy this module will be particularly relevant to students wishing to embark on careers in law, commerce, industry, central or local government or with regulators or professional bodies. It will be of interest to any student who wishes to develop an understanding of the relationship between law and finance.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module will examine the concept and nature of the modern state, including: typologies of states; structures and institutions of the state; policy-making and actors; and debates around issues such as the transition from pre-modern forms of political organization to modern states. It will also use case studies to illustrate examples of different types of state, including liberal democracies, façade democracies, transitional democracies, dictatorships and failed states.

    Read full details.

The first year of study introduces you to the key conceptual and historical issues as a foundation for more focused or specialised study in years 2 and 3, when you have more freedom to choose the areas which interest you.

Year 1 topics include:

  • Introduction to International Relations
  • Peace, Conflict and Diplomacy since 1945
  • Legal System
  • Contract Law

Year 2 topics include:

  • Approaches to International Relations and Foreign Policy
  • European Union Law

Optional modules include:

  • Shifting Global Power
  • Diplomacy Old and New
  • Governance and Public Policy
  • Peace and Conflict in Theory and Practice
  • Earth Democracy
  • American Foreign Policy
  • American Government
  • Politics of the Middle East
  • The Politics of the European Union
  • Public Law
  • Property Law
  • Evidence and Advocacy
  • Medical Law
  • Women and Law
  • Extension of Knowledge Module

Year 3 topics include:

  • International Security in an Era of Globalisation
  • Public International Law

Optional modules include:

  • Law Dissertation
  • Law Extended Essay
  • Work Placement for Professional Experience
  • Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding
  • Public Diplomacy and Global Communication
  • The Politics of Modern States
  • International Aid and Development
  • Human Rights and Social Justice
  • African Politics
  • Latin American Politics
  • Civil Liberties and Human Rights
  • Company Law
  • Immigration and Asylum Law and Tribunals
  • The Law of Finance and Taxation
  • Environmental Law
  • Law and Religion
  • Extension of Knowledge Module
  • Project
  • Placement

“In the first year module, Contract Law, we had a fantastic staff that taught us the basics of law very well. The same with the EU law in the final year. Also in the International Relations subject area, modules had excellent teaching staff in all levels of the course.”
National Student Survey 2016

The course prepares you for careers in organisations ranging from the The Foreign Office, the United Nations and the European Union, to international companies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) specialising in international development, overseas aid, human rights and environmental fields, and the media.

Students have also gained employment in research and teaching, international business, the media and political campaigns. Additionally, we have students working in a variety of overseas positions throughout the world.

Many also go on to be successful in postgraduate study.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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