Jess Gordon

French Pharmaceutical Science BSc student Jess Gordon discusses her decision to move to London to study with London Met. 

Where are you from and what brought you to London?

I am from Sain Dénis which is around 9km away from Paris, France. I used to live in the UK until 2007 then lived in France for 10 years and moved back in September 2017. I wanted to study in London because I missed the atmosphere and diversity when living in France. I also have family in London.

Why did you decide to study at London Met?

I chose to study at London Met because of the superlab, one of the largest and most advanced science teaching facilities in Europe. They also offered a range of different science courses.

How did you find the experience of moving to another country?

I was very happy and emotional moving back to the UK after many years. I was also anxious because so much has changed in London over time and I was worried how well I would adapt.

What has been your favourite part of the Pharmaceutical Science BSc?

I enjoy the tutorials and the superlab because we are organised into small groups. This gives us a better understanding and allows us to ask more questions.

What do you hope to do after graduation?

After I graduate from London Met, I either want to work in a laboratory, either the UK or the USA, before pursuing a master’s degree in microbiology. I’d then like to work in a laboratory where I can research viruses. Or, I’d like to take a sabbatical year then do my master’s.

What would you say to an international student considering a degree with London Met?

Studying in France then moving back to the UK to study was a long-awaited moment. I didn’t know what to expect from London Met but I was very pleased and I still am. The University offers many things that French universities don’t offer, such as many courses to choose from, a lot of support that is much needed and a range of activities. I spend most of my time at the library or at events held by the University. What I like most about London Met is the support you receive throughout the academic year and how everyone from different backgrounds can succeed and come together. 

Photo of Jess Gordon

"The University offers many things that French universities don’t offer, such as many courses to choose from, a lot of support that is much needed and a range of activities."