Dominique Blondel

 


 

 

A Photograph of Female Lecturer Dominique Blondel

Dominique Blondel

Principal Lecturer 
Politics
 

Raised across the disappearing borders of Europe, I have adapted my curiosities and academic engagements to circumstances. I graduated in Economics/International Studies (Warwick) and in the past have edited and published reports and articles on elections, unemployment, advertising, social policy, amongst others. More recently I have done some work on migration in Europe and farther afield.

At the University since 1994, I have developed and been responsible for Spanish studies, European studies, (Dept of Language Studies) and Spanish & Latin American (humanities) and more recently have been teaching Economy & Society, Comparative Politics and modules on Latin America, politics and development.

Political sociology, polls, opinions, the formation of political parties and a civil society played an important part in my young adult life in post-dictatorship Spain; state building, electoral studies, the acquisition of rights, entry into Europe (for me, again!), and the reality of ‘living’ politics steered me forwards and back from economics to political research and press, which I coupled with teaching and expanding relations between institutions in Spain and Sub-Saharan Africa. 

I teach the first year module, Introduction to International Development.

From Africa to Latin America is no small jump, though less of one than one might think: My humble contribution to the degrees in GIR at the moment has been in terms of comparative politics, political economy and Latin America’s political change over recent years and emerging Brazil. At present, within the new portfolio, I will be contributing to Earth Democracy, a module for second year students, with an emphasis on current grass-roots movements around the world and changing trends (towards sustainability?) in an interconnected world. An exciting moment!
 
Political change requires political engagement. I would like to think that my energies have an impact locally (grain of sand) and am happy to encourage those students who wish to, to make contact with local community organisations and faith groups actively engaged in campaigns for change here in our area, especially, of London. 

I am the current personal academic advisor in GIR for any questions you might have about your course and your time here. 
 
I can also offer help if you wish to study on one of the exchange/study abroad programmes offered in GIR.

Dominique Blondel 

Principal Lecturer 

d.blondel@londonmet.ac.uk