Youth Justice - BA (Hons)

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Why study this course?

On this degree you'll learn about criminological theory and the workings of the criminal justice system. You'll also gain practical work experience, ensuring you meet the requirements for entering the youth offending sector on graduation.

Our course is taught by practitioners and academics with a wide range of policing and criminal justice experience. They'll guide you through your development and provide you with the best opportunity to achieve your career aspirations.

More about this course

Increasingly youth offending is being addressed by community interventions rather than prison sentences. Our course offers you a unique opportunity to enter the youth offending sector at this vital time to help change the lives of young people.

The course is delivered by academics whose research addresses some of the most critical issues within the criminal justice sector today. They’ll be perfectly placed to enrich your learning experience and provide career insight, as they’ve worked with some of the highest performing youth offending teams in the capital.

This degree provides both the theoretical basis and practical experience you'll need to enter the youth justice sector. The course has been developed in conjunction with the Youth Justice Board and is delivered in partnership with the local authority youth offending service. On completion of this course you'll meet the Skills for Justice National Occupational Standards (NOS) set by the government, which means you'll automatically meet the requirements for employment within the sector.

Assessment

Many of the assessments will be related to real-work challenges and will take various forms including coursework, presentations, portfolios and explorative critical thinking projects. 

Detailed guidance and support will be given for all assessments and you'll have the opportunity to submit draft work or plans for individual feedback.

All work placement learning is assessed via a professional assessment document, approved by the Youth Justice Board and signed off by placement supervisors.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code L532
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of three A levels with grades BBC (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma or Access to HE Diploma with 60 credits)
  • GCSE English Language at grade C/grade 4 or above (or equivalent)

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Accelerated study

You can be accepted on the basis of relevant education and experience. Accredited prior learning can also be accepted for modules up to the equivalent of 240 credits (120 Level 4 and 120 Level 5) in a relevant subject.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (January start) - Friday morning

    The module aims to:

    1. Examine the emergence and development of criminological theory
    2. Examine the different ways in which different criminological traditions theorise crime and its social control
    3. Examine how the assumptions which underpin different traditions provide for different strategies of intervention and control
    4. Develop students’ learning and transferable skills in preparation for modules at levels 5 and 6.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module provides opportunities for students to Develop practice skills in an environment that is risk-free for service users and students. Develop abilities, skills and understanding of the role of a YOT worker to achieve readiness for practice across a range of different service user groups.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Thursday morning

    This module introduces students to the scope and functions of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) in England and Wales. It provides a broad overview of the mechanisms and aims of the CJS upon which students can build a more detailed knowledge of criminal justice policies, crime control, punishment and social control by the state, at levels 5 and 6. The module also specifically provides students with an introductory picture of the extent of officially recorded crime.

    The module aims to:
    1. Provide students with a solid grounding in the field upon which to build a grasp of issues relating to criminal justice
    2. Review the historical development, structures and roles of key agencies responsible for the execution of justice in England and Wales
    3. Identify key models of the Criminal Justice System such as the due process and crime control models
    4. Consider recent, and significant, examples of changes in the CJS (such as the increasing levels of inter-agency cooperation)
    5. Develop students’ knowledge of current policies relating to the ‘problem of crime’.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This is an introductory module for students on the Youth Justice degree programme that will equip them to both understand the current trends in youth offending, and those committing the offences. There will be some discussion of existing theories and research into factors impacting youth offending, however this will be centred around understanding these personal, social and peer factors can shape the actions of young people. The module will also provide students with initial insight into the workings of the criminal justice system in relation to how it engages with and seeks to support young people. The module will be taught in a workshop format.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The module aims to:
    1. Introduce and familiarise students with a wide range of criminological research
    2. Introduce students to various research methods and approaches used in criminological investigation
    3. Introduce students to a range of issues that need to be taken into account when undertaking criminological research.
    4. Familiarise students with the processes involved in conducting criminological research and the structure and format of research reports adopted by academics
    5. Prepare students for levels 5 and 6

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    This module will be delivered though a placement within a Youth Offending Team. The placement will be designed to support the students gain experience of working within the youth justice sector and applying the Standards for children in the justice system.

    This module will focus on national standards 1-2. The students will be supported by a senior member of staff who will act as their mentor whilst on placement.

    This module will be assessed by the completion of a placement portfolio that demonstrates both the student's application of the national standards and their reflection on their own practice and of those around them

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    The aim of this module explore the responsibilities, tensions and factors relating to safeguarding children and young people within a youth justice context. Although legal and practice based frameworks will be discussed, at the heart of the module will be helping the student understand the wide range of factors impacting child safety

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday morning

    The aim of this module is to support students to understand and evaluate the ways in which the youth justice sector supports children. The module will help students to understand what support mechanisms are needed within what settings and how their practice can help empower the child and their existing support network to take advantage of wider support structures.

    The module will be assessed through a case study scenario where the student needs to outline an intervention programme for a child.

    By the end of the module, students will be able to understand presenting needs of children, identify appropriate interventions for children to critically assess the effectiveness of their current YOT interventions.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    1. Consider the various relationships between media, technology and crime

    2. Develop an understanding of the role of the media in shaping perceptions of crime
    and criminal justice, with a particular emphasis on marginalised groups

    3. Develop an awareness and familiarity with the emerging forms of deviant
    behaviour facilitated by contemporary technologies and/or the media

    4. Provide an overview of the way technologies interact with crime and the criminal
    justice system

    5. Develop summarising and analytical skills

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon

    The module aims to:
    1. Familiarise students with the theoretical perspectives that have shaped criminological thought on violence by young people
    2. Encourage students to develop a critical overview of young people’s engagement in violent crime
    3. Develop students’ ability to research, analyse and communicate critical and informed arguments relating to the theory, policy and practice underpinning youth involvement in violent crime.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    A1. To provide students with a historical, theoretical and comparative understanding of the diverse forms of youth culture and youth social organisation;
    A2. To explore the social origins of youth gangs and street violence;
    A3. To consider the key developments in political mobilisation of young people;
    A4. To investigate the concepts and nature of social control in relation to youth;
    A5. To develop confidence in use of appropriate learning, analytical and discursive skills when dealing with current youth issues.

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module aims to:

    1. Develop students’ research skills which they will potentially be able to apply with the confidence and competence appropriate to an honours graduate in their future careers. Students will be required to develop self-reflexivity to know the limits of their competence and how to seek and offer constructive advice.
    2. Develop students’ report writing skills to enable them accurately to communicate the results of research to its intended audience in an appropriate manner, and adapted to influence decision making, policy formation and public debate. This will necessarily involve considering the ethical, legal and political implications of research.
    3. Develop students’ ability to manage their time over an extended period and meet successive deadlines.
    4. Develop students’ ability to work constructively with colleagues as part of a team.
    5. Provide students with practical experience of orally presenting research to peers and to develop their ability personally to deliver coherent commentary on the research methodology and skills employed and key research considerations and problems addressed and/or overcome.
    6. Develop students’ knowledge of the specific criminological topic they have chosen to research.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    This module will be delivered though a placement within a Youth Offending Team. The placement will be designed to support the students gain experience of working within the youth justice sector and applying the Standards for children in the justice system.

    This module will focus on national standards 3- 5. The students will be supported by a senior member of staff who will act as their mentor whilst on placement.

    This module will be assessed by the completion of a placement portfolio that demonstrates both the student's application of the national standards and their reflection on their own practice and of those around them

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    The module aims to:
    1. Identify and explore key concepts underpinning crime control
    2. Examine contemporary policies and practices of principal crime control agencies
    3. Enable students to understand the linkages between contemporary crime control and wider social policy (and accompanying political debate)
    4. Enhance analytic skills and instil a critical awareness through consideration of both official rhetoric and evidence together with the limitations of crime control policies and practice in a 'real world' context
    5. Explore the application of criminological theories and concepts to penal policy and practice and encourage confidence in the use of varied learning and discursive strategies
    6. Develop understanding of the operation of prisons and the role of imprisonment within the criminal justice system and wider society
    7. Explore comparative penal perspectives and develop understanding of diversity within penal policy and practice.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module aims to exploit specialism’s residing within the criminology team in London met so that students can apply theories to exciting and relevant areas of criminology


    The module aims to:
    1. Introduce students to theories and debates on the nature of crime control in the modern state
    2. Provide an overview of the major traditions of thinking within Criminology regarding the issue of illegal drugs their use and distribution
    3. Examine the way the attempts to control crime and deviance are examples of broader debates over social control
    4. Sensitise students to the ethical and social consequences that flow from the way in which contemporary society elects to punish offenders and prevent crime

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After the course

Successful completion of this undergraduate course will enable you to work within the statutory youth justice sector. There will also be significant scope to work within secure estates, such as the Youth Offending Institution Feltham or Thameside. These institutions often work in partnership with organisations such as Catch 22 or the Shaw Trust, which offer specific interventions around violence, rehabilitation and resettlement.

You’ll also be able to work within a local authority, national government or regulatory body policy team, helping to shape the future of rehabilitation and support for young offenders.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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