Media, Communications and Journalism - BSc (Hons)

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Why study this course?

Taught by international experts in their field, and focusing on a wide range of theoretical and contemporary subjects, this course provides you with a broad social scientific understanding of the role of media, communication and journalism nationally and internationally. You'll be able to contribute to our journalism Tumblr page, as well as take on exciting work opportunities to boost your employability.

More about this course

The growth of mass communications is inextricably linked to the development of the modern world. Developments in media technology have had a major impact, and an understanding of these powerful forces is vital to our understanding of the political and cultural world today.

This degree programme consists of a combination of media and journalism, and examines the political, technological and economic dynamics of the communications sector. The course focuses on a wide range of theoretical and contemporary subjects and will provide you with a broad social scientific understanding of the role of media, communication and journalism on a nation and international scale.

You'll learn what it takes to become a journalist through reporting, producing features and reviews, and undertaking investigations in our £100,000 newsroom. You'll also have the opportunity to have your own work published on our website. You'll develop transferable skills through workshops and exciting news days and use audio, video and mobile technologies. You'll also benefit from the advice of our team of professional advisers and our fantastic newsroom, which was opened by former editor of The Guardian, Alan Rusbridger.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through essays, individual and group research projects and a final dissertation.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code PP35
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBC in three A levels (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC National or Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)
  • Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate access or other preparatory courses or have appropriate work experience.

If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our Media and Communications (including foundation year) BSc (Hons).

Applications are welcome from mature students who have appropriate Access or preparatory courses or appropriate work experience, or those without formal qualifications who are able to demonstrate enthusiasm, commitment, and the ability to benefit from higher education.

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2020/21 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (January start) - Monday morning

    The module focuses on the role of genre in media production and consumption. Each delivery will explore two different genres, provide an introduction to the history of each, an overview of its conventions, a discussion of significant media texts within that genre, and opportunities for students to critically engage with genre texts. The module will address genre issues across a range of media forms, including film, television, radio, advertising, literature, mass publishing, and video games. The specific types of genre media addressed each year will change to reflect the changing media marketplace, and the changing critical tradition of media and cultural studies. Typical indicative genre forms covered by the module may include: science fiction, crime drama, heist movies, romantic comedies, situation comedies, soap operas, specific genres of documentary (such as biographical documentaries or science documentaries), the thriller, film noir and neo-noir, or martial arts movies. The module aims to:


    ● Facilitate the transition into undergraduate media, culture and communications studies and related disciplines by focussing on critical engagement with selective media texts;
    ● Introduce the range, diversity, and marketplace for genre based media texts;
    ● Provide an in-depth introduction to particular genre forms, such as soap opera or science fiction and genre conventions for those specific genre forms.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module provides an introduction to the history of the mass media, and to key theoretical arguments and debates that have emerged in response to the rise of mass media. It explores the development of press and publishing industries, photography, cinema, television, radio, the music industry and digital media by relating the technological changes to both their socio-cultural contexts and emerging theoretical perspectives. The module also provides grounding in key academic skills as part of the extended induction programme including research, academic reading, and presentation of learning.

    The module aims to:

    ● Provide an introduction to the study of media and its various rationales and methodologies.
    ● Promote a critical understanding of the history, content and structures of the media industries and examine the social, political and economic factors which shape them.
    ● Develop an understanding of the development of debates and theoretical contexts related to the media and media technologies.
    ● Develop and encourage confidence in the use of appropriate learning, analytical and discursive skills in both oral and written argument. To help students acquire key bibliographic research skills.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module introduces students to the practical and analytical skills (including looking at ethical problems) involved in professional news writing, newsgathering, collaborating in teams to produce stories, evaluating sources and revising writing.

    Students will be required to produce news copy in professional formats, which will include online posts using images, video and audio and the use of mobile technology.

    They will research and write a series of news articles and publish them to the class. They will learn newsgathering skills: analysis of reports, press releases and user-generated content; deducing news content from press conferences and announcements (diary items); following up human interest via face-to-face and phone interviews, including vox pops and the death knock; organising a team response to a major event; follow-up stories and case studies; analysing facts and figures to use in sidebar boxes; cultivating contacts and FoI.

    They will study contemporary news coverage to develop an understanding of how news stories are reported and created. They will discuss ethical, legal and commercial constraints on journalists and how different genres serve different markets.

    Accuracy, subediting, headlines and search engine optimisation will be important, as will developing stories through new media, images, audio, and video. This to include links to Youtube, soundcloud etc, with multimedia elements.

    The module will be assessed by two portfolios, using mixed media, and a timed class exercise. These will test students’ developing news sense, news gathering and news writing.

    Contribution in class will be measured by a journal recording the student’s activity, weekly updated, moderated by tutors at the end of the teaching period

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module will equip students on all journalism-related courses with the essential transferable skills of good writing, ensuring a solid grounding in the essential building blocks of grammar, style and rhetoric.

    Teaching takes place through a workshop mix of lectures, discussions, site visits, presentations and practical exercises, all aimed at mastering transferable skills and maximising employability in all branches of the communications industry. The theory and practice of correct grammatical usage will underpin all other work.
    Students will focus on the arts of news writing, subbing (proof-reading), and headline writing, explored through exercises inside and outside class, and through critical analysis of previously published work. Peer and self-reflective critiquing will be crucial, as they are in the media today.

    Students develop familiarity with writing in varied journalistic styles, including news, features, reviews, columns, sketches and comment. They will gain an understanding of why and how to write in different styles for different audiences.

    They will also start to work on their own unique journalistic style. As part of this, they learn how to focus a critical eye on other published work, using examples from a wide range of publications including newspapers, magazines, online formats, trade journals.

    Two sessions will introduce students to voice training.

    The module will be assessed by three in-class grammar tests, a portfolio of short articles, a portfolio of longer articles and engagement with class by online journal, moderated by tutors.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    Continuing on from the first-year core Reporting Skills, students in Advanced Reporting will develop the skills and techniques necessary to succeed in more advanced forms of reporting, including investigative journalism, features, and in-depth interviews and profiles. This course is core for journalism students and for some allied courses.

    Through a combination of workshops, masterclasses and site visits, students learn to identify subject matter and potential readerships; master interviewing and editing techniques across media; learn how to find original angles; undertake focused, widely sourced research on individuals and issues; and conduct on-the-spot reportage. They analyse statistics and develop stories based on them.

    This module develop students’ skills in multi-platform journalism. Via predominantly practical workshops, the students will learn the basics of radio journalism, as well as TV/video camera and editing skills, using cutting-edge software and equipment. This will reinforce their understanding of the need for 360-degree journalism in today’s society.

    They will work on projects within class with a view to publishing them online via the course website, www.hollowayexpress.co.uk
    Holloway Express, thereby providing an outward-facing portal for future employability.

    The module will be assessed by two portfolios of six stories (news and features) in total, comprising one podcast and one video package, both of which must show evidence of professional writing and newsgathering skills learnt in this module, plus a piece of long-form journalism (2,500 words) showcasing investigative reporting (this can use multimedia). Contributions to an online journal will assess class contribution, moderated by tutors at the end of the year.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module explores the place of the cultural and creative industries in contemporary societies. It examines a range of different conceptual frameworks used to study the structure, ownership and control of the creative and cultural industries as well as the relationships between creativity, economy and politics. It considers the applicability of such conceptual frameworks in the analysis of specific industries: film, music, television, press, internet. The module provides students with an understanding of the historical context of different processes of production, distribution and consumption of cultural goods.

    Aims of the module:

    ● To enable students to understand current critical theoretical debates in media and communication

    ● To enable students to understand the economic and political dynamics of specific cultural and creative industries
    ● To enable students to understand theories of production and consumption of cultural goods
    ● To enable students to understand the relations between culture and the state

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module combines critical engagement with theories of community and participatory culture; study of how media have been used to rebel and empower; and training in research and media practice.

    Students will study the theory and practice of community media, oral history, and documentary traditions. They will engage in interviewing, audio recording and editing. They will research community-based organisations and initiatives. They will use a range of media in researching, producing and presenting their own audio document.

    The module aims to:
    ● Enable students to develop a critical understanding of participatory culture and contemporary citizenship, with particular focus on community media, including their use by different social groups, and community development
    ● Enable students to research into community-based organisations and initiatives
    ● Enable students to research, produce and present their own audio document

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module critically examines the history of media audience research focusing on theoretical, methodological and ethical questions. Students study different ways of conceptualising and researching the relationship between media and audiences. They learn to evaluate and apply key concepts, theories and methods in designing and conducting their own piece of audience research.

    The module aims to equip students to:

    ● develop a critically understanding of different approaches to conceptualising media audiences and available research strategies
    ● examine and evaluate existing audience research, its history and context, and the methods that have informed it
    ● conduct a short piece of audience research

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module enables students to develop employability skills and competencies, understand the nature of work, and work toward developing a portfolio of skills and competencies to facilitate the transition into graduate level employment. The module combines a series of taught classes combined with either project-work opportunities or career development opportunities to be provided in conjunction with external employers and organisations. Students can choose two pathways through the modules:

    1) Undertake group project organised by the University in collaboration with external agencies and employers, working on a defined work-based project with clear and defined outcomes and expectations such as for example the production of marketing material, videos, photography, or other such project suitable to careers in the media or media-related industries. Projects will be advertised by week 5 and participation in projects will be based on competitive applications.

    2) Undertake a tailored career development programme in collaboration with external agencies and employers involving participation in all stages of application and interview for one of a selection of simulated positions relevant to careers in media or media-related industries, including application, interview and feedback. The stages of this programme will be evaluated by people drawn from industry.

    A series of taught classes will support both pathways through the module, and will be timetabled for the first 8 weeks of the module; an additional session in week 12 will encourage reflection and engagement in assessment activities. The module aims to enable students to:

    1. Consider their employability in relation to graduate careers goals, through the development of professional competencies and knowledge through work experience.
    2. Increase / develop critical, self-reflective ability and self-efficacy.
    3. Demonstrate theoretical concepts / transferable competencies in a practical, problem solving context.
    4. Gain understanding of current issues, practices and relevant legislation within a particular organisational context.
    5. Build personal networks, explore employment options and consider future career plans.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module examines the relationship between the media, crime and criminal justice. It examines the way crime and the law – and our understandings of them – are produced, reproduced and challenged in and through the contemporary media. The module considers how crime and criminals have been portrayed by the media over time, and assesses the different theoretical perspectives applied to media representations of crime and criminality. It examines the various ways the media actively work to construct crime as a news story, analysing the way the media sift and select crime stories, prioritizing some and excluding others, editing words and pictures and selecting particular tones and styles in their reports to create particular interpretations and viewpoints. The module also considers media portrayals of crime, criminals, victims and criminal justice agencies in a range of fictional and factual representations across TV, film and popular fiction. The social and cultural impact of these media representations is also discussed, with attention is given to the ways they may contribute to escalating fears of crime and how far they may contribute, themselves, to violence and criminal behaviour. Focusing on cultural, critical, and qualitative understandings of the relationships between crime and the media, the module draws on ideas and theories developed not only in the field of Criminology, but also the disciplines of in Sociology, Media, Communications and Cultural Studies.

    This module aims to:

    1. Examine the relation between media portrayals of crime and their broader social, economic and political context.
    2. Examine historical shifts in the way the media represent crime and criminal behaviour.
    3. Familiarise students with theoretical debates about the media’s effects on crime and criminal behaviour.
    4. Examine the connections between media portrayals of crime and criminal justice policy.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module aims to provide students with a rigorous understanding of the history, theory and practices of documentary photography, and to enable them to develop key photographic skills pertinent to the practice of documentary photography. The module will introduce students to the history, theory and practice of contemporary documentary photography. The module is slanted towards practice, and provides an opportunity for students to develop photographic skills or enhance their existing photographic skills, as well as their understanding of documentary photography. The module will provide practical tuition in the skills of street photography, portraiture, photographing objects in motion, and narrative photography, and will encourage and support students in the conception and development of their own documentary photographic projects. The module will also provide historical and theoretical contexts for students’ developing photographic practices, enabling them to critically reflect on their own practice as documentary photographers.

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  • This module introduces students to the basic techniques of teeline shorthand, transcription and voice recording.
    It requires regular attendance and practice to develop speeds of up to 60 wpm, as required by professional accrediting bodies.
    It will be assessed by three in-class tests and journal reflecting on class contribution, moderated by tutors.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module covers what student journalists need to know about how Britain works and the place of journalism within debates about ethics and the legal system. It is core for all journalism-related courses as everyone in the media needs to know how the system works.

    Classes will look at the ethical and judicial frameworks and constraints which control the reporting of legal matters, including crime and its contexts. Students will explore these subjects from the industry viewpoint, learning how to find and develop stories within the social and political landscape of Britain today.

    Within public administration, classes will survey: national systems of government and representation; local government; citizen remedies and freedom of information; foreign policy, the EU and defence; social services and education; health; the judicial system (civil) and human rights; emergency services; the criminal justice system, including police; finance and the stock exchange.

    At the heart of this course is the study of ethics. How journalists ought to behave – and what we can learn from those who do not behave properly – is particularly important to the profession. The public relies on the profession to give information. How should journalists get that information and how convey it?

    Ethics gives a deeper meaning to the study of the legal system for journalists. Classes will locate the law which journalists need to know, both civil and criminal, within a broader ethical framework in today’s multi-platform, multi-national world. Analysis of current cases and case law will be as important as knowledge of existing frameworks and codes.

    Field trips to magistrate’s courts and local authority meetings will be key to personal experience and understanding, as will guest speakers.

    Discussion, research, screenings and visits will all play a part in developing students’ critical thinking skills and the professional skill of accurate, legally acceptable writing.

    The module will be assessed by two portfolios (one of which includes multimedia), an essay, and an online journal moderated by tutors at the end of the year.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module provides aims to develop students’ independent critical and analytical skills by exploring the relationship between situation comedy and the socio-cultural context of comedy production. The module will examine the history of situation comedy, and the development of the genre, focusing on both television and radio forms. The module will incorporate screenings of significant examples of British and US situation comedies, and analyse their relationship to the socio-cultural context of their production. The module will discuss key themes in the development of situation comedy including the representation of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, family, and modes of production including studio-based production, mockumentary, and documentary style. The module aims to:

    1. Develop an understanding of the history and development of British and American situation comedy, including significant examples of situation comedy.
    2. Enable students to understand and analyse the relationship between situation comedy and the socio-cultural context of its production
    3. Encourage students to analyse the representations, ideologies and political ideas inherent in situation comedy.

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Students will work in teams in the multimedia newsroom to research, write and present multi-platform journalism, specifically in video and audio formats. The module is key for journalism and fashion marketing and journalism students, providing essential skills for today’s workplaces.

    Working to specified job descriptions, students will take on responsibility for the editorial and production processing and use knowledge to spot and prepare stories for forward planning diaries, with due regard to ethical and professional considerations.

    Student will work to tight deadlines and adhere to professional codes and standards during editorial cycles, which will periodically be explored in four newsdays and in two newsweeks. These will develop employability and focus around industry practices, including news conferences, bulletins and multimedia links.

    Students will be given the opportunity to work in specific professional genres (news, features, sport etc) or specific media (audio, video, newspaper, online). They will write, subedit and re-version copy for different platforms and purposes. They will use mobile technology and social media to enhance news values.

    Students will be encouraged to develop a contacts book and to publish work in professional publications, as well as on the course website. Language, writing and presentation styles will be developed to match or improve on contemporary industry practice.

    Through tutor coaching they will improve skills such as video, audio and copy editing, writing and editing copy and scripts, headlines and picture captions and learn how to use words, images, graphics, audio and social media, including tweeting, to construct narratives appropriate to stories and platforms. News weeks will develop team working and technical proficiency.

    Student development will be informed by sessions led by guest speakers from the industry and field trips to working news environments.

    Assessment will involve three portfolios of journalism. Engagement with class will be self-assessed and moderated by tutors.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon

    This module focuses on: international communications and debates around globalisation and cultural imperialism; development and modernisation; the role of transnational regulatory bodies such as the WTO; the structure of the global media industries and centres of power; the development of contra flow in media and culture; Media Systems models; and de-westernising of media studies. The module includes engagement with studies of media in various countries and regions, analysing developments in telecommunications and the cultural industries. It draws on economics, politics, and sociology in considering the contemporary debates around shifts in power and the potential role of social and new media.

    The module aims to:

    ● Introduce students to current theories of globalisation
    ● Critically investigate different theories and explanations for the imbalances in global communication
    ● Examine the structure of global media and their content and evaluate the current debates around the perceived implication of the dominance of a small number of countries over communication and culture
    ● Introduce students to Media Systems models and ideas involved in the debates on de-westernising media studies
    ● Examine Hollywood in the context of the WTO and the liberalisation of trade in the cultural industries.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module allows students to explore in depth a topic of their own choice, arising out of previous study and subject to supervisor approval. It offers an exciting way to make an area of expertise all your own, whilst developing both journalistic and academic communication skills.

    It must be a piece of longform journalism, aimed at a specified audience, not a study of journalism. It can be in any journalistic medium.

    Independent but supported learning and sustained research and writing will provide a focus for refining and drawing together a wide range of transferable skills.

    These must result in a high quality piece of journalism with an academically rigorous critical and research underpinning.

    A synopsis and project management schedule, demonstrating a research strategy submitted at week 8, will provide a signpost for further work. A three-hour refresher session on law will prompt attention to legal constraints.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module is focused around the production of an engaged and lengthy piece of independent research and academic writing. It provides students the opportunity to specialise in one area of the curriculum in their Honours year. Students may choose to develop a structured dissertation describing an independent primary research project (Route A), or a semi-structured extended literature review based on an independent secondary research project (Route B). This module aims to:
    ● To enable students to conduct a piece of independent primary or secondary research.
    ● To encourage students to draw on their previous studies in synthesising their personal perspective on a topic related to Media and Communications, and to develop their individual academic interests.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    The focus of this module is the examination of Popular Music with respect to culture and society, as well as the identification of Popular Music as a commercial enterprise.

    The module introduces key critical analyses of the nature and development of popular music as a cultural form. In doing so it explores the key social and cultural factors that shape our experience of music and the way we give it meaning within our lives, giving particular attention to issues such as gender, ethnicity, sexuality and social class.

    Drawing on studies produced within a range of theoretical fields, the module includes discussion of the relationship between popular music and processes of globalisation, the construction of star personas and celebrity culture, and the nature of audiences, fans and subcultures.

    By also examining examples of the historical development and the contemporary organisation of the music industry, the module encourages students to reflection upon the social production of popular music, and the impact of technological change on its creation and distribution.

    Students will be introduced to the important ways in which digital technologies in particular currently impact upon Popular Music and its audiences. This includes the roles of digital distribution and streaming in Popular Music, along with the use of social media and the creation of global audiences.

    This module aims to:

    1. Critically consider key theoretical perspectives developed in relation to the analysis of popular musical forms and genres.
    2. Examine historical shifts in the nature and operation of the popular music industry.
    3. Examine the impact of new technologies on the production, circulation and consumption of popular music.
    4. Familiarise students with theories regarding the social and cultural significance of popular music.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    This module looks at the professional skills of the journalist in politics, public affairs and society. It is both theoretical and practical, offering an introduction to the world of advocacy for anyone intrested in acquiring these skills.
    Students will examine the historical and political contexts of journalism, the role of charities and special interest groups such as environmental and rights campaigners and how to cover lobbying and direct action. They will analyse the ethics of committed journalism and debate how to justify bias.
    They will explore, through discussion, presentation and professional practice, links with PR and internal comms professionals, viral and social media, humour and satire, human interest stories and running appeals.
    They will produce original work for a campaign of their choice, which they must pitch to their classmates and tutor.
    Formative assessment will be an essay on how campaigning has changed events and whether such campaigning is justified
    An overview of media law and ethical considerations will underpin a summative project of campaigning journalism which will combine original research, in either a series of three short articles or one long article and a log of events and contacts.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday morning

    This module will examine and analyse traditional and modern visual special effects using examples from film, music video, television and games to illustrate the development of new techniques from old. Practical exercises, lectures, and demonstrations will aid students in developing a wide spectrum of technical and analytical skills in the field of digital post-production and visual special effects. Students will be expected to undertake all stages of the creative planning process to deliver an integrated digital video and audio project in order to complete the module. This module aims to:

    ● Develop and encourage confidence in the integration of appropriate motion graphics software
    ● Examine the effects of visual special effects on audiences and contemporary culture
    ● Illustrate how new digital imaging techniques have built upon traditional methods
    Analyse the most effective approach to a variety of visual effects problems

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module presents a critical review of key aspects of contemporary theory, research and practice in political communication and the mediatisation of politics. It considers how these may be challenged and transformed by new technologies and methods for shaping personalised messages. Using an inter-disciplinary perspective, the module examines key theoretical concepts pertaining to political communication as normally understood in the West, then goes on to pose normative and empirical questions on how they can be assessed outside those contexts.

    The module aims to:

    ● explore social and political theory in the areas of power and policy-making;

    ● introduce students to key developments in political communications in the UK and internationally;

    ● introduce students to alternative political communication systems and comparative work;

    ● examine political communication issues at the global level and related debates about transnational communications, citizenship, identity, nation branding and soft power.

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What our students say

"All the lecturers on my course have had experience in the journalism industry. They're an endless source of motivation and inspiration. The course, along with the lectures, has pushed me to gain multiple work experience placements. Furthermore, the course is a great mix of practical and theoretical."
National Student Survey

After the course

Graduates can find careers within news organisations, advertising, digital media, education, market research, media production and management, public relations and publishing. You could also go on to undertake postgraduate study.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.



When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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