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Mathematics and Computer Science - BSc (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Entry requirements Modular structure After the course How to apply Meet the team Visit us

Why study this course?

The Mathematics and Computer Science BSc degree prepares you for a career in computer science or mathematics, but also for work in the computing industry as whole. After graduating from this course, you can proceed to PGCE in Secondary Mathematics Teaching, as well as computing and mathematics MSc courses.

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More about this course

You'll learn through lectures, tutorials, seminars, computer-based learning, individual and group-based case studies and directed independent study.

This degree will help you develop mathematical problem solving, create logical mathematical arguments with conclusions; evaluating their limitations. You'll also formulate complex problems, analyse and interpret the results, and learn to work both independently and with others as part of a team. 

All mathematics and computing modules will have presence on the University virtual learning environment.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through tests, exams, essays, individual and group research projects and a final dissertation, with regular supportive feedback.

Professional accreditation

We will seek accreditation from the Institute of Mathematics and Its Applications (IMA).

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code G104
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • GCSE English and Mathematics at grade C or above (or equivalent)
  • one of the following: at least 80 points , of which at least 48 must be from a relevant area, from two or more A levels, one of which must be in Mathematics, or
  • at least 80 points, of which at least 48 must be from a relevant area, from two A levels including Science, Physics or Engineering or from a BTEC National Diploma in Science, Engineering or relevant subject area with at least three merits in the final year, excluding common skills.

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    The module covers basic mathematical techniques of differential and integral calculus and of linear algebra that will be of later use throughout Mathematics and related degree courses. The module builds on and extends concepts learned in A-Level Mathematics. The contents covered and the skills developed are fundamental to the development of mathematical competence. Calculus and linear algebra form an important foundation for further studies in Mathematics, Finance, Statistics and Engineering.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    Students will receive an introduction to the principles of information processing and an overview of the information technologies for digital data processing using computational and communication devices, including an initial understanding of the requirements for usability, quality, complexity, security and privacy of the developed solution. The students will obtain initial practical skills in modelling, design, implementation and testing of software systems for real-world application using a suitable programming language.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    Students will receive an introduction to the business environment and the role of information management and information systems within business.
    The module develops an understanding of the Information Systems, the Software Development process and the basic technology underpinning these systems. This will include database management systems and the Internet. Students which will develop key skills and knowledge in the aspects of an information system, including databases, websites, and scripts with particular regard to usability.
    • The module aims to provide an overview of the nature of organisations, their business models, and how key areas operate to meet business objectives. It introduces students to organisational culture, data, information and knowledge management, and the role of information in organisational decision making.
    • Within the module the students will be given an appreciation of the effect of ICT on organisational performance, and a basic understanding of the processes of developing and maintaining information systems, software products and services.
    • An introduction to underlying technologies (e.g., databases, Internet and Web) is embedded in the module, which also seeks to develop basic competence and confidence in the use of appropriate tools, techniques and academic and communication skills, with an underlining awareness of legal, social, ethical and professional issues.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module develops the skills necessary to support academic study at degree level. It will also develop reflective learning and action planning via the Personal Development Planning (PDP) process. The first term topics will look into history of mathematics , development of modern number system and introduce idea of mathematical proofs. Different proof techniques will be covered using examples from Set Theory and Number Theory.
    The topics covered in the second term part of this module is to introduces the main ideas of graph theory and includes a variety of algorithms.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This is an introductory programming module, designed to develop interest, ability and confidence in using a programming language. Students will gain the basic knowledge and experience to solve simple programming problems using established techniques in program design, development and documentation.
    The student is also expected to develop their confidence needed to program solutions to problems through a series of practical programming exercises.
    Assessment: Coursework 1 (30%) + Coursework 2 (30%) + Multiple choice test (40%) [Pass on aggregate]

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)afternoon

    This module further develops students’ knowledge and skills in developing software applications for solving problems. It focuses on the data structures and algorithms in programming and the software technologies for building standalone, networked and Internet applications. The module is designed to enhance employability through the use of modern industrial tools and technologies, and familiarisation with the software development life cycle.

    The key skills and knowledge to be gained are:-

    • Provide students with an understanding of theoretical concepts related to the use of data structures, algorithms, programming patterns and software infrastructure in standalone, networked and Internet environments.
    • Develop students’ analytical skills in the context of processing, generating, transforming, transporting, storing, retrieving and presenting data.
    • Enhance students’ practical skills using appropriate methods and techniques for designing, programming and integrating software applications using user interfaces, data structures and persistent storage.
    • Provide students with an understanding of programming during the different stages of the software development lifecycle.
    • Enable students to apply analytical and practical skill in solving typical problems in standalone, networked and Internet environments.
    • Enhance students’ experience and employability through the use of appropriate current technologies, enterprise tools and development environments during software development.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    Introduces techniques for analysing, designing and implementing database systems. An understanding of data modelling and design concepts is provided and database programming language skills are taught. The practical aspect of developing database systems is emphasised and use is made of a widely-used commercial database system (e.g. Oracle) for this purpose.

    The module will enable students to give an introduction to the issues governing the design and implementation of database systems. Theoretical aspects of designing sound database systems, as well as the practical aspects of implementing such systems are presented. This therefore allows students to understand, and put into practice, the techniques available for analysing, designing and developing database systems.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    The module extends the students’ knowledge of the techniques of calculus and introduces the concept of differential equations.

    This module aims to give students a thorough understanding of the analytical techniques available to solve first and second order ordinary differential equations.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    The topics covered in the first term of this module is to introduce formal inductive and recursive structure on the natural numbers. This structure underlies many aspects of program design and validation, and formal methods. An introduction to combinatorics and the generetaing functions are designed to enhance the students algorithmic tool set.

    The topics covered in the second term part of this module is to introduce students to the abstract algebraic structures of groups, which arise from the ideas of symmetries and of vector and matrix calculus repectively. These two primary examples of algebraic structures have applications across science and engineering, and also provide a firm foundation of necessary basic algebraic notions for the student to further their study mathematical study.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    The module extends the students’ knowledge of the techniques of calculus and introduces the concept of multivariable Calculus as well as calculus of vectors.

    This module introduces Vector-Valued Functions and extends ideas of calculus of one dimension to Vector-Valued Functions.

    Prior knowledge: MA4010 Calculus and Linear Algebra

    Read full details

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon

    This module serves as a core module for all maths students to do a one-semester project in the broader sense and as an alternative to the Faculty’s 30 credit Project module. The feature of the module is summarised as follows.
    1. Students will follow their own interest to pursue an individualised study independently under staff supervision.
    2. Students taking this module with the same supervisor may study the same subject but the assessments should be individualised.
    3. The allocation of supervisors to students should be done at the end of year two. Students can take this module in either autumn or spring period.
    The programme of study is very much individualised and there is a variety of format. The following are just two typical examples: (a) Pursue an investigative study on a particular topic, with an assessment of written report plus viva, and (b) A self-negotiated study in any subject area following a printed textbook or online material, assessed by a coursework consisting of a mixture of solutions to exercise questions, a written report, and a viva (oral presentation). In the later case, there must be an “investigative and independent factor” in the study. Any other innovative format is encouraged.

    The module aims to
    1. Provide students with an opportunity to pursue an academic area of interest independently, subject to the availability of an appropriate supervisor, where a taught module is not available.
    2. Develop students’ ability to search the internet and library for useful information.
    3. Enrich students’ experience of self-negotiated study.
    4. Improve students’ employability by enhancing their skills through report writing and reflection on independent learning.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module introduces a model based approach to the construction of software systems using formal specification languages as a basis for the software development. It will provide students with the knowledge and skills to produce formal specifications from informal descriptions and to implement them using appropriate programming techniques.

    The module aims are to:

    • Introduce model based formal specification languages
    • Provide students with the knowledge and skills to construct formal specifications from informal descriptions
    • Provide understanding of techniques used in the design and implementation of software systems and relating the principles to real world and practical examples
    • Refine formal specifications for implementation and implement them

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module develops a rigorous approach to the whole process of solving problems arising from real life scenarios and the module consists of providing solutions to a number of such problems. For each given problem, the process of dealing with it includes an initial analysis, identification of the main factors involved, establishment of a differential or difference equation as a mathematical model of the problem, analytical and/or numerical analysis to solutions of the equation, making predictions and drawing conclusions to the model, and feedback to solving the problem.

    The module aims to
    1. Introduce the process of model building from a non-mathematical description of a physical or industrial process or in a business application.
    2. Introduce the idea of mathematical modelling as a means of solving real problems.
    3. Present powerful tools of differential/difference equations to analyse the models in order to make appropriate predictions.
    4. Develop the student's ability to work effectively in-groups.
    5. Improve the student's communication skills through report writing and presentation.
    Pre-requisite knowledge: MA5011 Further Calculus and MA5052 Differential Equations (studied or Co-requisite)

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon

    The module enables students to undertake an appropriate short period of professional activity, related to their course at level 6, with a business or community organisation and to gain credit for their achievements. The activity can be a professional training, a volunteering activity, employment activity, an activity within the School of Computing and Digital Media Virtual Business Environment (VBE), placement or business start-up activity.
    For the purpose of this module – the VBE will be also be recognised as ‘the employer’.
    It is expected student should work for 150 hours which should be recorded clearly (in a learning log for instance) in the portfolio. The 150 hours can be completed in 25 working days in a FT mode, or spread over a semester in a PT mode.
    Students should register with the module leader to be briefed on the module, undergo induction and Work Based Learning planning and to have the Work Based Learning approved, before they take up the opportunity. It is essential that students are made aware that both the “Work Based Learning agreement” and relevant “health and safety checklist” where applicable need to be approved before starting the learning activity.

    The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to:
    • gain a useful experience of the working environment and the career opportunities available on graduation.
    • undertake a work-based project appropriate to their academic level.
    • enhance and extend their learning experience by applying and building on their academic skills and abilities by tackling real life problems in the workplace.
    • enhance professional and personal development.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Friday afternoon

    The module is an introduction to modern ideas in cryptography. It proves the background to the essential techniques and algorithms of cryptography in widespread use today, as well as the essentials of number theory underlying them.
    The module looks at symmetric ciphersystems and their use in classical cryptography as well as public key systems developed to support internet commerce and deliver data security for private individuals.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Friday afternoon

    The module is an introduction to modern ideas in error correcting codes. It provides the background to the essential techniques and algorithms in widespread use today, as well as the essentials of number theory and finite field theory underlying them.
    Error correcting codes are an important part of the data communications theory and allow a message to be recovered even if errors have been introduced during transmission. The elegant mathematics of finite field theory is introduced to develop multiple error correcting codes with a wide range of communications applications.

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After the course

Graduates from this degree can build careers in the field of mathematics, but also work more broadly in the computing industry. You can also proceed to PGCE in Secondary Mathematics Teaching, as well as MSc Mathematics areas.

There are careers for which a degree in mathematics is either essential or a strong advantage. These fall into a number of general areas:

  • scientific research, design and development
  • management services and computing
  • financial work
  • statistical work
  • teaching
  • postgraduate study

You can gain experience and earn while you learn through work placements and client-driven projects.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats - key information set

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How to apply

Apply to us for September 2019

Applying for a full-time undergraduate degree starting this September is quick and easy – simply call our Clearing hotline on or complete our online Clearing application form.

UK/EU applicants for September full-time entry must apply via UCAS unless specified otherwise.

Applicants for September part-time entry should apply direct to the University using the online application.

Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course.

Our UCAS institution code is L68.

Visit UCAS for more details.

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