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Electronics and Internet of Things (including foundation year) - BEng (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Entry requirements Modular structure After the course How to apply Meet the team Visit us

Why study this course?

Our Electronics and Internet of Things (including foundation year) BEng course is ideal if you’d like to study an undergraduate degree but don’t have traditional qualifications or can’t meet the requirements to enter our standard three-year degree. You’ll graduate with the same award and title as students on the standard course.

This four-year degree with a built-in foundation year will equip you with fundamental knowledge concerning electronics, mathematical techniques and computing, as well as vital study skills.

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More about this course

Our Electronics and Internet of Things (including foundation year) BEng course will open doors for you to enter careers in industries that require skills and knowledge relating to the Internet of Things and electronics, such as telecommunications, healthcare and automotives.

Throughout your course you’ll receive exceptional support from our staff, including regular feedback on assessments and your progress. There will also be opportunities to work on your transferable and employability skills, with interview and job application skills workshops organised by our careers service team.

During the foundation year you’ll focus on improving your study skills, while gaining fundamental concepts in electronics, digital systems and mathematics. You’ll find that the skills you gain throughout this year will be applicable to a number of professions and fields of study, helping you to build a portfolio of highly desirable attributes in the real world.

Your foundation year will be shared with students from other foundation year courses, so you’ll get to learn about different areas of study in the School of Computing and Digital Media that will allow you to get a broader perspective on your own study and learn more about other fields in the electronics and computing sector.

In the subsequent three years of your studies you’ll study the same course content and have the same choice of modules as students on our Electronics and Internet of Things BEng degree. If, at the end of your foundation year, you’d like to change your degree specialism there will be flexibility to allow you to do this.

Assessment

Assessments in your foundation year will consist of summative assignments, reflective reports, progress tests, coursework and practical workshops. In the subsequent three years of your study you’ll also be assessed by written and laboratory-based examinations, as well as a final year engineering project or dissertation.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code H211
Entry requirements View
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Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • at least one A level (or a minimum of 32 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg BTEC Subsidiary/National/BTEC Extended Diploma)
  • English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C/4 or above (or equivalent, eg Functional Skills at Level 2), if you meet UCAS points criteria but obtained a grade D/3 in English and/or Maths at GCSE you may be offered a University test in these areas

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Tier 4 student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2019/20 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 0 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning
    • all year (January start) - Thursday afternoon

    On this module students will learn the fundamental knowledge concerning computer security, basic cyber threats and the corresponding detection and defence techniques. Core security concepts, terminology, technologies and professional cyber security skills will be introduced via case studies and laboratory experiments.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Friday morning

    This module aims to introduce basic hardware and software elements relevant to robotics and internet of things (IoT) at foundation level (level 3). In particular, the module is designed to provide students with an introductory overview and practical experience in design and development of a simple system involving elements of robotics and IoT.

    The module covers the necessary principles and theory through formal lectures/seminars followed by comprehensive laboratory practice involving workshop-based exercises and a case study.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday morning

    This module introduces students to a range of mathematical techniques involving algebraic properties and graphs of the algebraic, logarithm, exponential and trigonometric functions. Furthermore the module introduces mathematical techniques of differentiation and integration of simple functions.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Thursday morning

    The module introduces students to theoretical concepts underpinning computer software design; and to programming using a high-level language concentrating on sequence, selection, iteration (loops) and list processing. It is assessed by three individual online tests (20%, 20%, and 30% weighting) and a group programming assignment (30% weighting).

    It aims to enable the student to use a programming language in a familiar and confident way in a variety of practical situations, and to use an integrated programming development environment competently.
    It also enables the student to design and write simple programs, individually and in groups, using the programming language constructs described in the syllabus below; and to develop techniques to ensure software quality and robustness, and to produce a reflective report.

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Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday morning

    This module introduces a range of fundamental concepts in both analogue and digital communications, through theory and lab work. The module also considers ethical, social, economic and environmental issues relevant to the communications and telecommunications fields.

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  • The module introduces students to the analysis of DC (including both steady state and transient behaviour) for resistors, capacitors and inductors. Techniques for the analysis of DC resistive circuits will be introduced including serial and parallel networks, mesh and node analysis and the principle of superposition. Equations for the response of a switched voltage across a capacitor and inductor will be developed considering an R-C and R-L circuits. The module then develops the analysis of AC circuits, introducing the more powerful methods associated with the use of complex numbers

    Aims of the module: what key skills and knowledge will it enable students to develop?
    1. To introduce students to the basic principles governing the behaviour of electrical circuits;
    2. To introduce students to the applications of complex numbers in AC analysis;
    3. To develop the ability to analyse more complex circuits by using techniques of network analysis;
    4. To develop the ability to design circuits to meet a given specification within agreed tolerances;
    5. To develop an awareness of the two different modes of analysis of time-domain and frequency domain.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    The module is designed to introduce the most common electronics devices and their applications in small-scale systems. The module is divided into two broad sections of analogue and digital electronics. The module is based on formal seminar/lecture sessions followed by comprehensive practicals/tutorials in both areas which provide an opportunity for students to gain experience in using and applying the laboratory’s test and measurement equipment/simulators.

    The aims of the module are as follows:
    1. 1. To familiarise students with commonly used electronic components, standard laboratory test and measurement equipment and their usage in designing/analysing, building, and testing simple electronic circuits/systems.
    2. 2. To introduce students to circuit simulation software and develop an awareness of its strengths and limitations
    3. 3. To introduce students to the basic electronics and measurement techniques through practical approach and provide scope for putting theory into practice and develop investigation/analysis skills that exemplify core electrical and measuring principles relevant to the course.
    4. 4. To develop the ability to write a well-structured, concise and thoughtful logbook / report / poster.
    5. To develop the ability to work independently as well as in team

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module develops a range of mathematical techniques including set theory, logic, relations and functions, algebra, differentiation and integration. The techniques provide the foundation for further study of mathematics and related applications in Computer Science, Computer Games Programming, Computer Systems Engineering and Robotics and Electronics and Internet of Things.

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Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module builds on the knowledge gained in the first-year module CT4002: Electronic Systems. It aims to introduce some subtle, real-world issues associated with electronic sub-systems by means of carefully chosen group design case study. The group design involves hands-on approach in analysis, design and troubleshooting of mixed-signal systems involving discrete components and ICs (Integrated Circuits).
    The module follows a key set of engineering processes such as research skills, systems level analysis and design, circuit simulation, PCB/prototyping, soldering and testing which enable them to understand the real-world aspects of simple but sufficiently involved electronic systems.
    This laboratory-based module is delivered in such a way that students have a balanced autonomy enabling them to explore personalised learning, creative problem solving, demonstrate and acquire transferable skills.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module introduces students to the basic concepts of microprocessors and the role that hardware and software play in the functional behaviour of microprocessor systems. Students are then introduced to some of the more common microcontrollers. Interfacing external memories as well as various input/output devices and sensors are also covered. The module enables students to analyse the requirements of a given task, make decisions in selecting an appropriate controller, design and implement prototype hardware/software for a typical embedded systems product. Practical workshops are designed to introduce microprocessor software development, testing and debugging. Workshops provide students with an opportunity to use both ‘C’ and assembly language.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This module examines the technology underlying current and future mobile wireless systems. It provides the essential theoretical principles and concepts encountered in the design of typical modern communications systems. Various analogue and digital modulation schemes essential for information transmission are examined, including the detrimental effect of noise in limiting system performance.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module focuses on computer laws, social, ethical and professional issues (LSEPI) underpinning the IT discipline. It also covers techniques for the world of work such as job search, CV and interviews as well as professional ethics and responsibilities. Topics on academic research and academic writing are also presented. (Exam and course work).

    Assessment: Coursework (60%) + Unseen exam (40%) [Pass on aggregate]

    The aims of this module are to:
    • Provide students with knowledge and understanding of the regulations governing the digital environment (e.g. Internet) and social, ethical and professional issues (LSEPI) underpinning the IT discipline.
    • Prepare students for the world of work and equip them with the knowledge and appreciation of professional bodies, code of conducts and professional certifications.
    • Introduce students to academic research and research ethics, and to academic writing.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester
    • spring semester

    This module consists of a short work placement (or work-related activity) lasting over one semester. This usually translates into 12 to 15 full working days (or the part time equivalent of this) in the framework of 150 hours (15-credit module) considering some time for reflection, research and documentation. The work placement is facilitated by University’s Careers and Employability Team. The module enables students to undertake an appropriate short period of professional activity, usually related to their course at level 5 (Intermediate level), with a business or community organisation and to gain credit for their achievements. The activity can be student’s part-time job, a volunteering activity, employment activity, an activity within Londonmet, an activity related to client’s brief or business start-up activity.

    The module aims to provide students with the opportunity to:
    • gain a useful experience of the working environment.
    • undertake a real work-related activity/project appropriate at level 5.
    • enhance and extend their learning experience by applying and building on their
    academic skills and abilities by tackling real life problems in the workplace.
    • enhance professional and personal development.
    • develop and document employability related skills

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module is based on Networking Essentials (Cisco). It teaches networking based on application, covering networking concepts within the context of network environments students may encounter in their daily lives – from small office and home office (SOHO) networking. Students who complete this course are prepared to begin the CCNA Routing & Switching and IoT curricula.
    Students will recognize the significant impact of networking in the world and learn skills needed for entry-level home and small business network installation positions.
    The module covers the necessary background through formal lectures/seminars followed by comprehensive hands-on practical workshops.

    The module aims:
    • To explain the operation of Local Area Network (LAN), and the internet
    • To enable students to perform subnetting of IP addresses as well as scaling IP addresses
    • To gain an understanding of static and dynamic routing protocols
    • To understand Network documentation, security and troubleshooting
    • To understand WLANs, and how to configure residential wireless routers in a SOHO environment

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module develops the skills required for the design and analysis of continuous-time signals and linear systems. It provides the necessary mathematical tools for linear circuit analysis and design such as operational amplifier-based active filters. It also provides analysis of periodic and non-periodic signals.

    The aims of the module are:
    • To understand the necessary mathematical tools for linear system analysis and design
    • To understand the necessary mathematical tools for the analysis of signals
    • To apply the mathematical tools on real applications involving signals and linear time-invariant systems
    • To develop the ability in solving a real problem in the field of linear systems such as active filter design and analysis.
    • To develop the ability in analysing periodic and non-periodic signals

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Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module extends the digital design techniques learnt at intermediate level to the use of Application Specific Integrated Circuits. It provides an extensive treatment of the use of Virtual Hardware Description Language using the industry's standard (Xilinx/Altera and its associated hardware).

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  • The module is designed to provide students with technical knowledge and skills on Internet of Things (IoT) technologies. Theoretical material delivered in the lectures is supported by practical lab work to ensure students have a sound grasp of the technical content where students are expected to develop IoT systems. A number of devices, platforms and software tools will be introduced during the course from different vendors. The module is assessed through lab reports and final examination

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module introduces students to microwave and optoelectronic technologies. It covers the key features of modern microwave wireless systems, their operations and design requirements. Also covered is basic concepts of optoelectronics. Students are shown how various optoelectronic devices are currently used in laser line-of-sight and fibre optic communication systems. The module develops analytical and design knowledge and provides experience of team working through a group work.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    The module enables students to demonstrate their acquired knowledge and skills through a systematic and creative investigation of a project work, either individually or as part of a group, in accordance with their course requirements. The topic of investigation will cover a broad spectrum of various analysis and techniques and will lead to a comprehensive and concise academic/industry-related report. Students will be assisted in exploring areas that may be unfamiliar to them and encouraged to develop innovative ideas and techniques. Students will be able to choose a project that may require the solution to a specific problem, creation of an artefact in a real-world environment or an investigation of innovative ideas and techniques related to an area within their field of study. Collaboration with outside agencies and projects with industrial, business or research partners/ sponsors will be encouraged.

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  • This module aims to provide students with the technical background and skills necessary to design and construct robotic devices. It reviews a selection of sensors and actuators that are commonly used in robotic products and provides students with practical experience in the design, construction and evaluation of relatively simple fixed and mobile robots. It also helps students develop an awareness of legal requirements governing robotics, including personnel, health & safety, intellectual property rights, product safety and liability issues. The module covers the necessary background through formal lectures/seminars followed by comprehensive hands-on practical workshops.

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  • The module aims to prepare students in analysing, designing and developing image processing algorithms routinely used in commercial computer vision systems (e.g. Robots). This module covers fundamental principles, underlying mathematics, algorithmic implementations and practical configurations of computer vision systems. After successful completion of this module, students are expected to professionally evaluate elements of computer vision systems and work with real-world computer vision systems.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    This module is designed to develop understanding, knowledge and skills associated with the various malicious hacking attacks targeting computer systems and the appropriate safeguards needed to minimise such attacks.

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After the course

After graduation you’ll be well equipped to begin a career in areas such as cyber physical systems, electronics and the Internet of Things (IOT).

There will also be opportunities for postgraduate study at master’s, MPhil or PhD level.

What is a degree with a foundation year?

This is a four-year degree course with a built-in foundation year (Year 0). It's the perfect route into university if you don't meet the necessary entry requirements for the standard undergraduate degree. You'll graduate with a full undergraduate degree with the same title and award as those who studied the three-year course.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Start your course in January

You don't have to wait until September to start this course at London Met – why not start in January?

If you're a UK or EU student, you can simply call our January hotline on or complete our fast-track online application form.

If you're an international student, you'll need to complete our standard online application using the "Apply direct" button.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

Non-EU applicants looking to study part-time should apply direct to the University. If you require a Tier 4 (General) student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

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