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Diplomacy and International Relations - BA (Hons)

Add to my prospectus Why study this course? More about this course Our teaching plans for autumn 2021 Entry requirements Modular structure Where this course can take you How to apply

Why study this course?

Explore contemporary diplomacy against the changing nature of world politics in this highly innovative degree course. Lecturers with nationally recognised expertise guide you through issues of international terrorism, climate change and violent conflict, and introduce you to the practices of a variety of international players including Greenpeace, the United Nations, and even celebrities and private individuals.

92% of politics students were satisfied with the teaching on their course and 93% with the learning opportunities, according to the National Student Survey 2021.

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More about this course

This exciting course provides students with an excellent grounding in the development and dilemmas of diplomacy and international affairs in today’s globalising world.

This degree is practically oriented and you’ll gain experience and develop your skills through formal opportunities to interact with serving and former diplomats and other international actors. You can also take part in simulations, roleplay exercises, and a variety of assessment tasks.

There are also excellent opportunities for you to pursue a specific interest, such as a particular region (eg the Middle East or Africa) or to study a language. Our teaching team can also support you in finding a work placement with a relevant organisation in your final year. We've helped our students secure work placements in embassies, government departments and non-governmental organisations such as Amnesty International.

Members of the course teaching team have nationally-recognised expertise in developing students’ employability, and the practical dimension of the course, along with opportunities for reflection through the various methods of assessment, will enable graduates of the programme to promote themselves effectively in the competitive job market.

This course received a 100% overall student satisfaction rate in the 2018 National Student Survey.

Assessment

Modes of assessment on this course comprise practically-oriented assignments such as reports, presentations, portfolios comprising blog entries and other forms of reflective writing, briefing papers, individual and group research projects, and case studies.

This is in addition to essays and a very small number of examinations.

Fees and key information

Course type
Undergraduate
UCAS code L251
Entry requirements View
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Our teaching plans for autumn 2021

We are planning to return to our usual ways of teaching this autumn including on-campus activities for your course. However, it's still unclear what the government requirements on social distancing and other restrictions might be, so please keep an eye on our Covid-19 pages for further updates as we get closer to the start of the autumn term.

Entry requirements

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades CCC in three A levels (or a minimum of 96 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification)
  • English Language GCSE at grade C/4 or above (or equivalent)

If you don't have traditional qualifications or can't meet the entry requirements for this undergraduate degree, you may still be able to gain entry by completing our International Relations (including foundation year) BA (Hons) degree. 

Applicants with relevant professional qualifications or extensive professional experience will also be considered on a case by case basis.

Accreditation of Prior Learning

Any university-level qualifications or relevant experience you gain prior to starting university could count towards your course at London Met. Find out more about applying for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL).

English language requirements

To study a degree at London Met, you must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. If you require a Student visa you may need to provide the results of a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

If you need (or wish) to improve your English before starting your degree, the University offers a Pre-sessional Academic English course to help you build your confidence and reach the level of English you require.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2021/22 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning
    • all year (January start) - Thursday afternoon

    • To introduce the main concepts and debates in international political economy
    • To provide the skills necessary for comparative analysis;
    • To introduce and examine the principle institutions of global economic governance
    • To explore the impact of these institutions on the process of development.
    • to provide the skills necessary for comparative analysis;
    • To enhance the ability to communicate effectively verbally and in writing;
    • To develop competence in discussion

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Monday morning

    The broad aim is to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of the study of international relations. In particular to:

    1. Analyse historical precedents and the institutions underlying contemporary international relations.
    2. Understand the contemporary challenges facing the world and the institutional and political factors which hinder, or help provide, solutions to these problems.
    3. Make informed judgements about current international affairs – and future developments – within the larger theoretical frameworks and approaches to international relations.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Monday afternoon

    This module aims to:
    1. Provide a detailed account of the development of the Cold War and post-Cold War international systems at global, regional and sub-national levels;
    2. Introduce students to key concepts related to diplomacy, peace and conflict;
    3. Examine the role of diplomatic institutions and peace processes in attempts to contain or resolve violent conflicts;
    4. Encourage the development of the skills of comparative analysis, by comparing conflicts in different regions;
    5. Develop and encourage confidence in the use of appropriate analytical, written and oral skills.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning
    • all year (January start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module has two broad purposes. Firstly, it gives students an introduction to the main ideas underlying the study of politics. What are the dominant ideologies that have shaped politics and what are their principal contentions. Secondly, it will explore and systematically compare the principal characteristics of government.

    Read full details

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    One of the central questions for the discipline of International Relations is to explain the behaviour of states in the international system. On this module you will explore two of the most important and significant approaches to addressing this question: IR theory and foreign policy analysis respectively.

    On the first half of the module, you will explore the various theoretical perspectives which can be used to understand the dynamics of the international system and how they condition state behaviour. It explores both explanatory and critical approaches to this issue, the former seeking to explain how the international system operates, with the latter seeking to transform the nature of world politics in one way or another.

    The second half of the module approaches the question from the perspective of foreign policy analysis, focusing on the decisions, structures and processes within states that produce international action. You will examine both models of foreign policy decision making and comparative national approaches to foreign policy.

    Therefore, the module aims to:

    • Develop your understanding of two key areas of the discipline of International Relations: IR theory and Foreign Policy Analysis;
    • Enable you to apply theories and models to international affairs;
    • Enhance your ability to explain and critically analyse contemporary world politics;
    • Enable you to develop your academic writing skills, so you will be able to write about international politics with confidence.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module explores the practice of modern diplomacy. The first half of the module explores the historical emergence and evolution of diplomacy and the classic texts of diplomatic theory, before going on to concentrate on the roles and functions of traditional diplomatic institutions, systems and processes, such as embassies, foreign ministries, diplomatic services and international organisations.

    The second half of the module explores the main challenges posed to diplomatic practice by global change in recent decades: the rise of inclusive multilateral diplomacy in the UN and other fora; the increasing importance of non-state actors in contemporary diplomacy; the impact of faster air travel enabling leaders to conduct their own diplomacy; the revolution in information and communications technology; and innovations in diplomatic institutions (such as the emergence of the European External Action Service).

    A key theme running through the whole module is the evolving nature of international negotiation, which will be illustrated through detailed case studies of environmental, security and trade diplomacy.

    This is a highly practical module. Students will have opportunities to develop their ability to blog and use Twitter, engage in simulated negotiations and interact with practitioners through visits to embassies and other institutions and/or practitioner classes.

    Read full details
  • The broad aim of this module is to develop a grounding in the fundamentals of US foreign policy making in the context of contemporary international relations. In particular, to:

    • Analyse policy making institutions and historical precedents underlying US foreign policy, and to grasp the way those precedents affect America’s approach to global events since the end of the Cold War and the attacks of 9/11.
    • Assess the processes and limitations of US foreign policy making, the contemporary challenges facing the world and the American role in dealing with them, and the expectations of US influence in the world in coming years.
    • Place American foreign policy within the larger theoretical frameworks and approaches to international relations.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    A new innovative module combining work based learning and a radical model of critical and transformative citizenship. This module has been developed to allow you to work intensively with a London community project/organisation in order to identify (in partnership with them) a challenge they are faced with and work towards positively addressing this challenge This innovative module is an exciting opportunity to work at a grass-roots level to effect change and to learn about the key issues currently affecting London and other large cities.

    We live in the sixth wealthiest economy in the world, and London produces 22% of all Gross Domestic Product (GDP). However, we also have a significant problem with inequalities and wealth distribution. The current poverty rate in the UK is 22% and in London this is even higher at 28%.

    As of July 2020 there have been 79,437 violent crimes in the last year resulting in injury in London and 152 homicides. Included within this, there has been a steady increase in incidents of serious youth violence, with latest figures showing 8,151 young victims. This is despite concerted efforts to better support young people. The COVID-19 lockdown raised awareness of the prevalence of domestic violence, however, even before lockdown London was seeing a steady increase with reported cases rising from 75,159 in April 2016 to 91,226 in June 2020.

    London's health inequalities are created by social, geographical and biological factors. The difference between highest and lowest healthy life expectancy in areas of London is 15.7 years based on Public Health England data. Contributing factors include infant mortality, excess weight, physical activity, smoking, homelessness and disease.

    We are facing a global climate and ecological crisis, and London is a case in point. As the capital’s population grows to 11 million by 2050, addressing problems of polluted air, water stress, poor access to public greenspace, and the effects of climate change, such as overheating and flooding, will become increasingly urgent. London therefore has ambitious targets to meet WHO air quality guidelines by 2030, become carbon neutral by 2050, and become half greenspace and have 12% more tree cover by 2050.

    However, at the same time the scope for local authorities to address these issues has been reduced by heavy pressures of austerity and a neo-liberal policy agenda. Many local community voluntary organisations are left with a vacuum to compensate for.

    As a university and ‘anchor institution’ to the London economy, we believe it is our role to help ‘Empowering London’. This module has been designed to empower you as our student by learning about some of the challenges facing our city and to contribute to addressing this via work based learning. Our fundamental aim is to help you become a values driven graduate who can make a positive difference to society. This module will provide you with some of the tools to achieve this goal.

    The module is designed to enhance your wider personal and professional development. It will facilitate application and progression of knowledge gained via your studies and wider life experience. The module includes values-driven, professional training and work experience to assist in preparing you for your individual future career. Through work based practice, you will positively contribute to a key part of the University’s Strategic agenda, addressing current social and economic issues facing London communities. This unique module allows you to be challenged by contributing to current, real world projects, working with the University and students from other professional disciplines to make a positive difference to society.

    The initial stages of this 15 credit, year-long module will introduce you to a range of professional skills and techniques, including: reflective self-assessment; preparation for employment as a values-driven graduate within inclusive work environments; becoming an ethical leader; being a critical employee and developing approaches for co-operative and collaborative working.

    You will then be introduced to employment experience opportunities supporting organisations and/or individuals in the local community. This could include working with communities and organisations towards programmes aiming to address collective identity and civic agency in neighbourhoods. You will work individually or in teams, in partnership with community institutions to support the activities of one of London Met’s strategic priorities - the Empowering London initiative. Your practice will positively contribute to addressing the challenges facing London which impact everyone’s lives.

    The module has been co-created with students and ongoing feedback will be sought from a range of students on an ongoing basis.

    The module aims to enable you to:
    ● Effectively express and understand your current skills and abilities in relation to your career values and goals
    ● Practically apply the knowledge gained through your course programme to a work/neighbourhood environment
    ● Make a positive contribution to the challenges of current social and economic issues facing the University’s local communities and consider these from national and global perspectives
    ● Gaining unique insight of current challenges facing cities in the areas of social wealth; the environment; discrimination; health; poverty and deprivation and crime and partner with community institution to design potential solutions
    ● Gain understanding and direct experience of the graduate level skills, knowledge and insights required for inclusive practice and problem resolution within institutions to enable you to become an inclusive leader in society
    ● Recognise your personal and professional development through your work based practice and how to apply the experience and knowledge gain to your future goals

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday morning

    The course offers students the opportunity to engage with a range of debates surrounding the politics of migration and diaspora studies in a variety of manifestations prevalent in the world in 20th and 21st centuries, combined with the rise of Nativist/Populist movements within the age of post-truth politics.

    It looks at the present situation through a historical perspective, taking the current ‘refugee and migration crisis’ as a point of departure, and placing it in a global context. The module specifically focuses on the migration journey from departure to the country of residence, therefore from decision to migrate to diasporisation. The module will also scrutinise the rise of nativism in the shape of the populist far right promoting the interests of native inhabitants against diaspora groups, new citizens and cultural diversity.

    Furthermore, the module will inform the students about large-scale refugee and diaspora population movements, and how such movements speak to issues of social justice, global inequalities, human and minority rights. Moreover, the social and economic consequences of migration on sending and receiving societies, as well as the different shapes of nativist opposition to migration and diasporas, will be discussed with different examples in various regions of the world.

    The module is intentionally multidisciplinary and incorporates debates from international relations, history, sociology, anthropology, political science and geography. It seeks to answer a number of questions, including:
    1) What are the effects of migration on both the states that receive immigrants and the states that send emigrants;
    2) How policy-makers respond to these effects and why these responses vary from one country to another;
    3) Are there similarities and differences between Nativist/Populist movements?

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    • This module will critically examine the democratic role of the mass media, audio-visual and communications services in contemporary national political environments.
    • To consider whether the media has a democratic purpose in disseminating free information through plurality and diversity.
    • To assess the political economy of media institutions, the public policy questions concerning their development and status, and the impact of the new forms of communication and information transfer.
    • To consider how political messages are communicated by political elites to the public during elections and periods of government.
    • To consider how political issues are represented through the news media and popular fictions.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module aims to:

    • Introduce students to competing theories of peace and conflict
    • Explore the nature and causes of conflict in the contemporary era
    • Provide an understanding of some of the institutions and organisations (governmental and non-governmental) that work in conflict situations
    • Analyse the varied objectives and methods of such organisations
    • Introduce the core practical skills for work in relevant fields, thus enhancing employability

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    The broad aim of this module is to develop an understanding of politics in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region, in the context of contemporary international relations, and in particular to:
    • describe and explain the processes by which the states and societies of the contemporary MENA region were formed;
    • explore the main ideological currents that have influenced the political development of the MENA region, particularly those inspired by religion and nationalism;
    • examine the interstate and international relations of the region, focusing on the sources of conflicts and the difficult relationship between the West and the region.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Friday afternoon

    This module explores theories and conceptions of racism and ethnicity, and the practices of racism in contemporary societies. The historical roots of racism will be examined and its contemporary forms studied comparatively. Racism is specifically explored within the context of social and political conflicts.
    Module aims
    • To analyse critically key concepts including racism and ethnicity themselves in order to develop an awareness of their contested nature.
    • To look at these issues as worldwide problems and in a sociological context that explores the meanings ascribed to these terms, their historical origins and key examples of societies where these issues have been or still are important in shaping the social orders in which people live.
    • To consider the impact of racism on specific communities and groups, including national, religious and ethnic groups.
    • To examine the links between class, gender and ethnic differences. 

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module will examine how the nature of power in international relations has changed since the ending of the Cold War. The collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s was argued by many to be a triumph of the West’s military and industrial might, ushering in what Francis Fukuyama described as the ‘end of history’ – the triumph of western liberal democratic ideas. However, events since then, not least the attacks of 9/11 and the economic collapse of 2008, have highlighted new threats that exist, the increasing role of non-state actors, and the rise of competing economic powers.

    This module will examine how international politics is changing and how the nature of power - defined as the ability to affect others to obtain the outcomes you want - has evolved. It will show that power is not static, but that it may now be more complex in nature, as innovation, technologies and relationships change.

    This theoretical approach will be applied to consideration of how power may be shifting in the 21st Century from the West to the East, or the so-called “Rest”. This will involve a regional analysis, examining how and why some states are rising in global prominence, e.g. China, India, and Russia, and why the West may (or may not) be in decline.

    The module will also consider the role of such factors as religion, media, and cyberspace in relation to notions of power.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning


    The broad aim of this module is to enable students to apply knowledge of strategy-making and strategic thinking as a historical practice to contemporary problems, and, in particular, to:

    1. Understand the development of strategic theory and practise.
    2. Examine how strategy can be applied by the study of significant case studies.
    3. Examine the nature of strategy and how it relates to both policy and action in the 21st Century.
    4. Encourage students to think as practitioners.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module has three principal aims:

    1. It will explore the historical origins of Union and its predecessor bodies in the first two decades after WWII. What agents and factors facilitated such a innovative development in European political history?
    3. It will explore the political character of the Union. What sort of organisation is it in political terms? How democratic is it?
    4. It will examine its principal policy outputs, including economic, monetary, social and foreign policies

    Read full details

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This cutting-edge module explores one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields of contemporary diplomatic studies and an area which has seen a wide variety of innovations in state practice in recent decades. As public opinion has come to be seen as increasingly influential and important in world politics, states and other international actors have rediscovered public and cultural diplomacy, a form of diplomatic practice in which states engage with publics both abroad and at home. Due to changes in global communications, this form of diplomacy is undergoing rapid change, which makes it especially interesting and important.
    The module examines the changing nature of public and cultural diplomacy in the context of the evolution of global political communications. It explores the nature of international political communication, evaluating key concepts such as propaganda, place branding and strategic communications, and examines the role of culture in world politics more broadly, including media such as film and the internet, as well as key actors such as celebrity diplomats. It explores competing definitions and interpretations of public and cultural diplomacy, along with how their practice has changed in recent decades, especially since the end of the Cold War.
    This is a practically-oriented module which will ensure equitability in student learning experiences towards the overall degree qualification. . Blended learning is encouraged in the classroom through the use of multimedia and internet resources. This is complimented by students gaining experience of the nature of contemporary public diplomacy and international political communication through visits to embassies, guest lectures by serving or former public diplomats, and role-play exercises and simulations.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This core module providing a vocational and advanced undergraduate research element for PIR courses aims to:
    • enable the student to gain a useful experience of the working environment
    • enable the student to enhance and extend their learning experience by applying and building on their academic skills and capabilities by tackling real life problems in the workplace.
    • provide the student with an opportunity to design a research proposal relevant to their placement.
    • allow the student to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.
    • enable the student to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.
    • offer a medium for the student to report upon their work placement experience.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday afternoon
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    This module providing an advanced research element for PIR undergraduate courses aims to:
    • enable the student to demonstrate an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, and be able to apply analytical techniques, problem solving and project management skills commensurate with a short dissertation.
    • enable the student to synthesise skills and knowledge and apply them successfully to complex issues in a short dissertation.
    • provide an opportunity to design a short dissertation relevant to their degree.
    • allow the student to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.
    • enable the student to undertake relevant research and write up findings in short dissertation form.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module providing an advanced research element for PIR undergraduate courses aims to:
    • enable the student to demonstrate an understanding of a complex body of knowledge, and be able to apply analytical techniques, problem solving and project management skills.
    • enable the student to synthesise skills and knowledge and apply them successfully to complex issues.
    • provide an opportunity to design a research project relevant to their degree.
    • allow the student to utilise research and analytical skills acquired during their programme of studies.
    • enable the student to undertake relevant research and write up findings in dissertation form.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module looks at the alleged ‘crisis’ in contemporary Africa, focusing on problems of economic, social and political development. This module aims to challenge assumptions about the problems of contemporary Africa by examining these problems in detail and by looking at Africa’s place in the world.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon

    This module aims to:

    • Examine a range of approaches to the cessation of contemporary conflicts and the conditions that may be necessary for peace
    • Explore the differing mechanisms and strategies for securing peace, including negotiation, mediation and arbitration
    • Focus upon both the domestic and international actors involved in these processes
    • Provide students with an understanding of relevant theories and empirical material for comparative analysis

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    A new innovative module combining work based learning and a radical model of critical and transformative citizenship. This module has been developed to allow you to work intensively with a London community project/organisation in order to identify (in partnership with them) a challenge they are faced with and work towards positively addressing this challenge This innovative module is an exciting opportunity to work at a grass-roots level to effect change and to learn about the key issues currently affecting London and other large cities.

    We live in the sixth wealthiest economy in the world, and London produces 22% of all Gross Domestic Product (GDP). However, we also have a significant problem with inequalities and wealth distribution. The current poverty rate in the UK is 22% and in London this is even higher at 28%.

    As of July 2020 there have been 79,437 violent crimes in the last year resulting in injury in London and 152 homicides. Included within this, there has been a steady increase in incidents of serious youth violence, with latest figures showing 8,151 young victims. This is despite concerted efforts to better support young people. The COVID-19 lockdown raised awareness of the prevalence of domestic violence, however, even before lockdown London was seeing a steady increase with reported cases rising from 75,159 in April 2016 to 91,226 in June 2020.

    London's health inequalities are created by social, geographical and biological factors. The difference between highest and lowest healthy life expectancy in areas of London is 15.7 years based on Public Health England data. Contributing factors include infant mortality, excess weight, physical activity, smoking, homelessness and disease.

    We are facing a global climate and ecological crisis, and London is a case in point. As the capital’s population grows to 11 million by 2050, addressing problems of polluted air, water stress, poor access to public greenspace, and the effects of climate change, such as overheating and flooding, will become increasingly urgent. London therefore has ambitious targets to meet WHO air quality guidelines by 2030, become carbon neutral by 2050, and become half greenspace and have 12% more tree cover by 2050.

    However, at the same time the scope for local authorities to address these issues has been reduced by heavy pressures of austerity and a neo-liberal policy agenda. Many local community voluntary organisations are left with a vacuum to compensate for.

    As a university and ‘anchor institution’ to the London economy, we believe it is our role to help ‘Empowering London’. This module has been designed to empower you as our student by learning about some of the challenges facing our city and to contribute to addressing this via work based learning. Our fundamental aim is to help you become a values driven graduate who can make a positive difference to society. This module will provide you with some of the tools to achieve this goal.

    The module is designed to enhance your wider personal and professional development. It will facilitate application and progression of knowledge gained via your studies and wider life experience. The module includes values-driven, professional training and work experience to assist in preparing you for your individual future career. Through work based practice, you will positively contribute to a key part of the University’s Strategic agenda, addressing current social and economic issues facing London communities. This unique module allows you to be challenged by contributing to current, real world projects, working with the University and students from other professional disciplines to make a positive difference to society.

    The initial stages of this 15 credit, year-long module will introduce you to a range of professional skills and techniques, including: reflective self-assessment; preparation for employment as a values-driven graduate within inclusive work environments; becoming an ethical leader; being a critical employee and developing approaches for co-operative and collaborative working.

    You will then be introduced to employment experience opportunities supporting organisations and/or individuals in the local community. This could include working with communities and organisations towards programmes aiming to address collective identity and civic agency in neighbourhoods. You will work individually or in teams, in partnership with community institutions to support the activities of one of London Met’s strategic priorities - the Empowering London initiative. Your practice will positively contribute to addressing the challenges facing London which impact everyone’s lives.

    The module has been co-created with students and ongoing feedback will be sought from a range of students on an ongoing basis.

    The module aims to enable you to:
    ● Effectively express and understand your current skills and abilities in relation to your career values and goals
    ● Practically apply the knowledge gained through your course programme to a work/neighbourhood environment
    ● Make a positive contribution to the challenges of current social and economic issues facing the University’s local communities and consider these from national and global perspectives
    ● Gaining unique insight of current challenges facing cities in the areas of social wealth; the environment; discrimination; health; poverty and deprivation and crime and partner with community institution to design potential solutions
    ● Gain understanding and direct experience of the graduate level skills, knowledge and insights required for inclusive practice and problem resolution within institutions to enable you to become an inclusive leader in society
    ● Recognise your personal and professional development through your work based practice and how to apply the experience and knowledge gain to your future goals

    Read full details
  • This module engages with the contemporary debate about the theory and practice of human rights, about their origin, the ideal of their universality, their imperfect institutionalization, and the challenges facing their implementation in a world of domestic populisms and international conflict.

    Module aims

    To provide a historical and critical introduction to ideas and institutions of human rights, and to evaluate their relation to state sovereignty and international conflict.
    To provide an understanding of the relation of theory to practice, facts to values, politics to ethics, and ideas of universality to both cultural tradition and relativical relativity.
    To relate philosophical theories and propositions to practices and issues of political, social, economic, legal and international justice.
    To elaborate arguments that are at once logical, evidenced and reflectively ethical.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    The broad aims of this module are to understand the fundamentals of security studies and its importance in an increasingly connected world. In particular to:

    • Think in broad, conceptual terms about the changes in international security occasioned by the impact of globalisation, especially since the end of the Cold War in 1989, and evaluate the differing interpretations of its development and assess the processes through which it has occurred over time.
    • Understand “Security” conceptually in both its international and national contexts.
    • Evaluate the contested military and non-military terrain of globalisation and security issues.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The broad aim of this module is to question the assumptions about contemporary Latin America as a region and its place in the world and, in particular, to examine:

    • the underlying political ideas and trends instrumental in shaping Latin American politics today, including the role of the USA;
    • the internal politics of modern Latin American states and the role of these states within the region;
    • the impact due to globalisation and the rise of political and economic importance of other developing regions;
    • to encourage students to think about the complexities of problem-solving in this context.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Thursday afternoon

    The module aims to:
    1. examine the debate over of the origin of a variety of forms of ideological, nationalist and religiously motivated violence in the form of 'terrorism'.
    2. explore the dimensions of the new ‘terrorist’ threat.
    3. examine the contemporary range of counter terrorist agencies and policies in the
    national and international context.

    Read full details
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module aims to:

    • Examine competing theories of the modern state
    • Evaluate the historical evolution of modern states
    • Compare and contrast the range of different types of state across the globe, from democracies to authoritarian states
    • Analyse the state in relation to contemporary 21st century issues, such as globalization, social welfare provision, and protest movements
    • Encourage confidence in the use of appropriate analytical, written and oral skills, to enhance students’ transferable skills and employability

    Read full details

Where this course can take you

Graduates have found positions with organisations involved in international negotiation and global governance including the UK Department for International Development, the United Nations, national diplomatic services, regional organisations, aid and development agencies, international business and national diplomatic services.

The programme is also excellent preparation for further study or research. High numbers of our graduates have embarked on postgraduate courses in diplomacy, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, international relations, international human rights law, and international public policy at prestigious higher education institutions both in the UK and around the world.

Additional costs

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Discover Uni – key statistics about this course

Discover Uni is an official source of information about university and college courses across the UK. The widget below draws data from the corresponding course on the Discover Uni website, which is compiled from national surveys and data collected from universities and colleges. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, information for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

September 2021: If you’re a UK student or an EU student with settled/pre-settled status and want to study full-time from September, you can apply through Clearing – call 0800 032 4441 or apply online. If you're an international applicant or want to study part-time, select the relevant entry point and click the "Apply direct" button.

Applying for 2021

If you're from the UK, or you're from the EU and have settled or pre-settled status, apply through Clearing for courses starting in September 2021 – call 0800 032 4441 or apply online.

Applying for 2022

If you're a UK applicant wanting to study full-time starting in September, you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified. If you're an international applicant wanting to study full-time, you can choose to apply via UCAS or directly to the University.

If you're applying for part-time study, you should apply directly to the University. If you require a Student visa, please be aware that you will not be able to study as a part-time student at undergraduate level.

If you're applying for a degree starting in January/February, you can apply directly to the University.



When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

To find out when teaching for this degree will begin, as well as welcome week and any induction activities, view our academic term dates.

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