Exhibition: 25.06.2013 – 05.07.2013

Unit 2 - The City Gate

An urban proposition next to the Hop Exchange by Ben Hutton

Unit led by Dow Jones Architects

About the show

“The ontological function of the beautiful is to bridge the chasm between the ideal and the real.”

H-G.Gadamer, The Relevance of the Beautiful.

"…the boundary is that from which something begins its presencing."

M. Heidegger, 'Art and Space'.

This year we are going to look at the historic boundary of the city, and in particular the mediatory role of the City Gate. There is a clear typological relationship that links the Temple Door to the City Gate and through the Scaenae Frons to the Theatre. The City Gate is symbolically the place of reconciliation of the centre and the edge, and operates as a threshold to both the inside and the outside. From Rykwert we learn that the purpose of the City Gate was to enable the dead to leave the city, and this points towards an horizon of otherness ‘beyond the walls’.

The world ‘beyond the walls’ was traditionally the domain of fairs and theatre, hospitals and burial grounds, markets and recreation. The great London Fairs of the middle ages - Southwark, St. Bartholomew’s and May - were established on the ‘Liberties’, Church land outside regalian jurisdiction, which linked the fairs to festive time. This, and the origins of the City Gate as an epiphanic structure, naturally meant this was also the place of theatre.

As London grew, the sites of the fairs were subsumed by the metropolis, and now find themselves deep within the contemporary city. However, their former life ‘beyond the walls’ gives these areas their distinct character today. This year we will be studying the nature of being ‘beyond the walls’, and how by understanding these sediments of culture we can propose acoherent city architecture for today.

We will be looking at the horizon ofpraxis, and will be working in Borough and Clerkenwell - both sites of ancient fairs - to investigate the tension that exists between inside and out. This is perhaps characterized by the proximity of global city financial institutions and meat markets, but it also points towards the capacity for this city to accommodate a deeper metabolism, the real and the ideal.


Exhibition details

P.V. Tuesday 25 June 2013, 6.30-10pm
Opening Wed 26 June - Fri 5 July 2013
Mon-Fri 10am-7pm, Sat 11am-5pm
Venue Spring House (Ground Floor)
Unit Architecture Unit 2
Course Professional Diploma in Architecture RIBA Part 2
Architecture (MA)

Images

Smithfield Wash House

By James McNeill

Entrance lobby

By Adam Eckwortth

Axonometric of the Intervention at Smithfield

By Kate Nicklin

Axonometric study of the threshold condition of a new building for Gresham College

By M.J.Wells

Museum of London Archaeological Department

By Campbell Patterson

Artist’s live/work unit

By David Philips

Abstracted sectional drawing of the Quinta de Conceição, Matosinhos

By Eliot Foy

View of the City & Guilds Institute from Aldgate tube

By Joel Howland

Study axonometric of a new court theatre in Whitechapel

By Charles Deballe

View of a street within a new live/work project for Whitechapel

By John Marshall

Departures (after Pieter Bruegel)

By Graham Mateer

Axonometric of the Cooks’ Hall and Garden

By Byran Tsang

Elevation of Blake Institute from Bunhill Fields

By Judit Laczik

Clerkenwell Public Library

By Michael Vale

Project Axonometric

By Marina Shileva

Sketch – “A beacon in the city”

By Kit Ling Lam

Underground Plan of the Archaeology Workshops at Bridewell Palace

By Manos Pertselakis

External view across Smithfield towards Fashion School

By Kate Nicklin

Students

4th Year

Tom Atkinson
Edward Grocott
John Marshall
Kate Nicklin
Harry Ogden
Manos Pertselakis
Eliot Foy
Adam Eckworth

5th Year

Charlie Debelle
Joe Howland
Ben Hutton
Judit Laczik
Ling Lam
Graham Mateer
James Mcneill
Campbell Patterson
David Phillips
Marina Shileva
Bryan Tsang
Michael Vale
Matt Wells

Critics

Florian Beigel
Peter Carl
Phil Christou
Sandra Denicke-Polcher
Mel Dodd
John Glew
Gavin Henderson
Oscar Linares
Tim Lynch
Manuel Montenegro
Robert Mull
Will Palin
Ana Serano
Lisa Shell
Andrew Stone
Hugh Strange
Stephen Taylor
Christopher Woodward

With thanks to

Peter Youthead