Exhibition: 14.09.2012 – 17.09.2012

MSc Architecture, Energy and Sustainability

Gilles Alvarenga: Radiance daylight study under clear sky, 2010

This Master of Science course is tailored for architects and building professionals working in the built environment who want to acquire specialist skills and knowledge in low energy design towards truly sustainable development. It gives a practical and theoretical grounding in a list of topics bringing forward proposals to achieve its goals of reducing carbon dioxide emissions and ensuring steps are taken towards adapting to the impact of climate change. Skills are developed in a range of different methodologies for evaluating environmental conditions and predicting the effects of design solutions. These may include data collection and interpretation methods and computer-based simulation of buildings, set within a framework of low energy design principles. However, spaces are only successful when they combine sustainable design with high levels of occupant’s satisfaction.

The MSc Architecture, Energy and Sustainability course seek to empower students by giving them a critical understanding of the problems associated with adaptation to climate change and its mitigation through the rational use of energy. It will enhance current design vocabularies/techniques and challenge the student to contemplate a holistic approach towards low carbon building design and the integration of renewable energy in buildings. The course shows how to reduce the environmental impact of buildings while promoting occupant comfort and health.

Skills are developed in a range of different approaches to evaluating environmental conditions and predicting the effects of design solutions. These may include data collection and interpretation methods, environmental monitoring, computer-based simulations and post occupancy evaluation of the interaction of people with the built environment. These studies are particular relevant as large discrepancies have often been shown between predicted and real energy consumption. Emphasis is also given to refurbishment and upgrading of existing buildings as they have an important role to play in reducing carbon dioxide emissions from buildings and ensuring that they can meet the challenge of climate change. Integrated sustainable design goes beyond the construction process and needs to envisage the whole life cycle of the building.

The course is taught by the Low Energy Architecture Research uNit (LEARN) within the The Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design at the London Metropolitan University. Staff in LEARN have expertise in the field of low energy architecture, sustainability, lighting and daylighting, building thermal analysis, adaptive thermal comfort, environmental monitoring and post occupancy evaluation.

Buildings are responsible for almost 50 per cent of the UK's energy consumption and carbon emissions. The UK government has set out ambitious plans for new dwellings to be zero carbon by 2016 and for non-residential buildings by 2019. Refurbishment and upgrading of existing buildings is essential, as well as how to adapt existing buildings for a different climate and to reduce energy use to mitigate the impact of buildings on climate change. This has put UK at the forefront of countries to have a green agenda and may serve as an example to the required global trend towards sustainability.

People spend nearly 80% of their lives inside buildings. Therefore it is essential to promote a good indoor environment for improved work performance and increased human well-being without excessive use and depletion of natural resources. A pleasant indoor environment with low energy consumption is the major aim of good building design and planning.

The MSc Architecture, Energy and Sustainability course addresses the above issues in its curriculum. After completion of this course students will be able to interpret and act upon the results based on critical knowledge in a series of subjects related to energy and the environment, comfort and buildings, moving towards a truly sustainable design. These include:

  • Energy Comfort and Buildings
  • Low Energy Architecture
  • Daylight and Energy Efficient Artificial Lighting
  • Building Simulation
  • Thesis Brief Development and Research Methods
  • Building Performance: Measurement and Analytical Methods
  • Advanced Thermal Comfort Studies
  • MSc Architecture, Energy and Sustainability Thesis

The course is taught by the Low Energy Architecture Research uNit (LEARN) within the The Cass Faculty of Art, Architecture and Design at the London Metropolitan University. This unit was created in 1987 to bridge the gap between architecture and research in low energy design. Staff in LEARN have expertise in the field of low energy architecture, sustainability, lighting and daylighting, building thermal analysis, adaptive thermal comfort, environmental monitoring and post occupancy evaluation.

Besides running the MSc Architecture, Energy and Sustainability and administering the NCEUB Network for Comfort and Energy Use in Buildings, we have a PhD Program for students wishing to pursue research in these areas of expertise.


Exhibition details

Private view Friday 14 September 2012, 6pm-10pm
Opening Friday 14 - Monday 17 September
Friday and Monday 10am-6pm, Saturday and Sunday 10am-4pm
Venue Spring House

Images

Science Centre: Aikaterini Souani, Luzanne Smith, Gilles Alvarenga and Zacharoula Zegkinoglou

Katerina Tourna

Daylight and Energy Efficient Artificial Lighting

Mireira Izquierdo

Building Simulation

Evaluating the solar Energy potential of an Urban Housing site

Ugochukwu Iweala

Danijel Rusovan

Low Energy Architecture

Students

Aikaterini Souani
Luzanne Smith
Gilles Alvarenga
Zacharoula Zegkinoglou
Gilles Alvarenga
Katerina Tourna
Mireira Izquierdo
Danijel Rusovan
Andrea Klinge
Ugochukwu Iweala
Nadine Boehm
Gabriela Marrero
Sujal Pandya
Jose David Gomez
Marta Diez Amate