Mark Wheeler

Mark Wheeler  

Mark is a Professor of Political Communications who has led high-quality research, teaching and learning programmes. Accordingly, he has strategized appropriate research, pedagogical and management skills to enhance the School and the University’s international profile. His research interests include the political economy of the global mass media, policy reforms to media systems within Britain and the European Union, the political relations between Hollywood and Washington, and the rise of celebrity politics. He received his doctorate with is research ‘The Reform of British Television post-Peacock: A Policy Study’ from Queen Mary College, University of London in 1994. He is a Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics Media and Communications Department and the Global Policy Institute.

Mark has taught on modules and contributed to curriculum design at the undergraduate and postgraduate level concerning Political Communication and Public Relations, the Politics and Culture of Hollywood, Media and Culture, Public Diplomacy and the Globalisation of the Mass Media. In this respect, he has designed modules which deal with contemporaneous concerns about the media and multi-medias’ communication and marketing of political ideas, the political economy of the cultural industries and the rise of the social media. Within these modules, Mark has developed content to reflect upon the expanding role of the media in modern politics, corporate and social affairs.

Books

  • Politics and the Mass Media, (Oxford: Blackwells, 1997).
  • Co-author with Jeanette Steemers and Petros Iosifidis, European Television Industries, (London: British Film Institute, 2005).
  • Hollywood: Politics and Society, (London: British Film Institute, 2006). 
  • Celebrity Politics: Image and Identity in Contemporary Political Communications, (Cambridge: Polity 2013).
  • Co-author with Petros Iosifidis, Public Spheres and Mediated Social Networks: The Western Context and Beyond, (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2016) 

Journal Articles

  • (with Raymond Kuhn) ‘The Future of the BBC Revisited’, The Political Quarterly, (Vol. 65, 
  • No.4, October-December 1994), pp. 432-440.
  • ‘Democracy and the Information Superhighway’, Vicky Randall (ed),  Democratization and the Media, Special Edition of Democratization, (London: Frank Cass, Summer 1998), pp. 217-239.
  • ‘High-Tech Politics: The Impact of Information Communication Technologies in the Labour Party’s 1997 Campaign’, Convergence, (Luton: University of Luton Press, Volume 4, No.4, Winter 1998), pp. 42-58.
  • ‘Research Note: The ‘Undeclared war’ part II: the European Union’s (EU) consultation process for the new round of the General Agreement on Trading Services/ World Trade Organisation on audio-visual services’, European Journal of Communication, (London: Sage Publications, Volume 15, No.2, Summer 2000), pp. 253-262. 
  • ‘Globalization of the Communications Marketplace’, Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, (Cambridge Mass: MIT Press, Volume 5, No.3, Summer 2000) pp. 27-44. 
  • ‘Regulating Communications: British Public Policy Responses to Convergence within the Digital Age’, Canadian Journal of Communication, (Canadian Journal of Communication Corporation, Volume 26, No.1, Winter 2001), pp.119-129.
  • ‘Regulating Communications in the UK: A New Future’, Convergence, (Luton: University of Luton Press, Volume 7, No.3, Autumn 2001), pp. 28-35.
  • ‘Tuning into the New Economy: The European Union’s Competition policy in a converging communications environment’, Convergence, (Luton: University of Luton Press, Volume 8, No.3, Autumn 2002), pp. 98-116. 
  • ‘Supranational regulation: Television and the European Union’, European Journal of Communication, (London: Sage Publications, Volume 19, No.3, Autumn, 2004), pp. 349-369. (Translated into Chinese).
  • ‘Whither cultural diversity: the European union’s market vision for the review of Television without Frontiers Directive’ in Katherine Sarikakis (ed.) Special issue Media and Cultural policy in the European Union,  The Journal of European Studies: An Interdisciplinary Series in  European Culture, History and Politics,(Netherlands: Rodopi, 2007), pp. 227-249.
  • ‘Celebrity Diplomacy: UN Goodwill Ambassadors and Messengers of Peace’ in Jo Littler (ed.), Celebrity Studies: Special Edition on Celebrity and the Global, (London: Routledge, 2011).
  • ‘Celebrity Forum: 2010 Television Prime Minister debates’, Celebrity Studies (London: Routledge, 2011).
  • ‘The Democratic worth of Celebrity Politics in an era of Late Modernity’, British Journal of Politics and International Relations: Celebrity Politics special edition, (John Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).
  • ‘European Union State Aid, public subsidies and analogue switch-off/digital switchover’, International Journal of Digital Television, (Bristol: Intellect, 2012).
  • ‘A City Upon a Hill’: The Wire and its distillation of the United States polity’, Politics (Political Studies Association, 2014) 
  • ‘The Mediatization of Celebrity Politics through the Social Media’, International Journal of Digital Television, (Bristol: Intellect, 2014). 
  • (with Petros Iosifidis), The Public Sphere and Network Democracy: Social movements and Political Change?, Global Media Journal (Open Access, 2015).

Chapters in Books

  • ‘Multi-Mediatization and Citizens’ Rights’, Jo Langham Brown (ed) etc, ‘Tune in or Buy in’, (Luton: University of Luton Press, 1997)  
  •  ‘The Web Wars: the European Commission and British Governments’ response to the Internet’ Rachel Gibson and Stephen J. Ward (ed.s), Reinvigorating Government: Politics and the Internet, (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000).
  • ‘The Coverage of Political affairs: the Weapons of Mass Destruction Debate, the Kelly Affair and the Hutton Inquiry’ in Alastair McGown (ed.), British Television Handbook 2005, (London: British Film Institute, 2004).
  • ‘UK Perspectives: A ‘Third Way’ in British Communications Policy? in Marie-Françoise Labouz  and Mark Wise (ed.), La diversité culturelle en question(s) 
  • Cultural diversity in question(s) (Brussels: Editions Bruylant, 2005).
  • ‘Supranational Regulation: The EU Competition Directorate and the European Audiovisual Marketplace’ in Bridgette Wessels and Jackie Harrison (eds.) Mediating Europe: New Media, Mass Communications and the European Public Sphere, (Oxford, New York: Berghahn Books, 2009).
  • ‘The European Union’s Competition Directorate: State Aids and Public Service Broadcasting ‘in Petros Iosifidis (ed.), Public Service Media: Facing Up to the Digital Challenges, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).
  • ‘Celebrity Politics and Cultural Citizenship: UN Goodwill Ambassadors and Messenger of Peace’ in Asteris Huliaras, Liza Tsaliki and Christos A. Frangonikolopoulos (ed.s), Transnational Celebrity Activism in Global Politics Changing the World? (Intellect, 2011).
  • ‘Darryl F. Zanuck’s Wilson’ in Iwan Morgan (ed), US Presidencies at the Movies (Palgrave, 2011). 
  • ‘Bill Clinton: courting the Hollywood film industry’ in Mark White (ed.) The Presidency of Bill Clinton: The Legacy of a New Domestic and Foreign Policy (I.B. Taurus, 2012).
  • ‘Digital Switchover: European Union State Aid, public subsidies and enlargement’ in Hilde van den Bulck Manuel Puppis, Seamus Simpson (ed.s), European Media Policy for the Twenty-First Century: Assessing the Past, Setting Agendas for the Future (Routledge, 2016).
  • ‘Celebrity Diplomacy: Theories and Practices’ in The Sage Handbook of Diplomacy (ed.s Costas M. Constantinou, Paul Sharp, Pauline Kerr) (Sage Publications, 2016).
  • ‘The political history of Classical Hollywood: moguls, liberals and radicals’ in US Movies and the Great Depression (ed.s Professor Iwan Morgan and Professor Philip Davies) (Edinburgh University Press, 2016).
  •  ‘Human Rights, Celebrity and Democracy’ in Anthony Elliot (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Celebrity Studies (Routledge, 2017).

Expert Commentary

  • ‘The democratic worth of celebrity politics is dependent on whether or not there is ideological substance behind the politician.’ London School of Economics British Politics and Policy Blogsite April 23 2012. 
  • http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/2012/04/23/celebrity-politics-wheeler/
  • ‘Should celebrities promote charities? Professors Mark Wheeler and Ilan Kapoor go head to head.’ New Internationalist Magazine, September 2012.
  • http://www.newint.org/sections/argument/2012/09/01/should-celebrities-promote-charities/
  • 'The Wire’ reflects a declining American cityscape where people’s lives have become more dangerous and less comprehensible. London School of Economics. http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/2014/02/12/the-wire-american-cityscape/
  • Twitter tiffs and celebrity clashes as stars wade into Gaza debate, The Conversation. Summer 2014
  • https://theconversation.com/twitter-tiffs-and-celebrity-clashes-as-stars-wade-into-gaza-debate-30182 
  • Why Celebrity Endorsements and Popular Culture Failed to Help Hillary. Hillary Clinton had a wide range of celebrity endorsements. Donald Trump publicly disavowed the Hollywood elite. Is this the end of celebrities and politics? BTP’s Ross Evans sat down with Professor Mark Wheeler – Professor of Political Communications at London Metropolitan University and author of ‘Celebrity Politics’ – to ask if star power really is waning in the eyes of voters. 26 November 2016
  • http://www.btpadvisers.com/insights/blog/the-celebrity-endorsement-flop
  • Media Appearances
  • Interviewed on BBC Daily Politics, Radio Five-Live and LBC. Interviewed in The Times and range of international periodicals.

Conference Papers

  • Presented Conference papers at 1996, 1997, 2000 PSA Conferences, and 1996, 1997 and
  • 1999 ECPR Joint Session workshops. Presented papers at Griffith University, Queensland,
  • Australia, 1995. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Regulation of UK Communications’ at Public Service Broadcasting Beyond 2000, Banff, Canada, Summer 2000. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘GATS and audiovisual policies’ at the Politics Department, Nottingham Trent University colloquium, Spring 2001.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Analogue switch-off/digital switchover’ at Media and Politics Group two-day Conference, University of Loughborough, 10-11 September 2001. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘UK 2002 Communications Bill: recommendations and implications’ at Media and Politics Group one-day colloquium, University of Loughborough, 7 January 2003.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Politics of Hollywood’ at Institute of Communications’ colloquium, University of Leeds, 5 March 2003.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Television Policy and the European Union’ at Political Studies Association Conference, University of Leicester, 15-17 April 2003.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Spinning out control: The Labour government and Government Information Communication Services (GICS)’, European Consortium of Political Research Conference, University of Marburg, Germany, September 2003 and at PSA Media and Politics Group/Goldsmiths College one day colloquium, November 2003.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘UK perspectives: A ‘Third Way’ in British Television Policy?’ at Workshop on Cultural industries, University of Versailles, Paris, 14 November 2003.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Supranational regulation: Television and the European Union,’ at ESCUS conference, University of Sheffield, 23 September 2004.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Trade follows Film: Hollywood and US Trade Policy,’ at PSA Conference, University of Leeds, 5 April 2005.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Hollywood: Politics and Society,’ at the Politics Department, University of East Anglia, May 2005 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity: Campaign politics, activism and Hollywood showbiz’ at the PSA Media and Politics Group Event, 11-12th November 2005, University of East Anglia.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The politicisation of the Government Information Communication Service (GICS) and the formation of the Government Communication Network (GCN)’ at the Government Communication in the UK and Australia workshop, the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, Kings College, University of London, 10 March 2006.
  • Led a workshop strand entitled ‘Celebrity: Campaign politics, activism and Hollywood showbiz’ at British Film Institute Media Conference, Kings College, University of London, 5 July 2006.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Hollywood: Politics and Society,’ at the Department of Media and Communications, University of Westminster, 13 December 2006. 
  • Presented a Keynote speech entitled ‘The Review of the European Union’s Television without Frontiers Directive’ at the School of Film and TV Arts and Technology, Shanghai University, 16-17 June 2007. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity: Campaign politics, activism and Hollywood showbiz’ at the Seminar Series based at the Institute for the Study of the Americas, University of London, 15 November 2007.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity Politics and Cultural Citizenship: UN Goodwill Ambassadors and Messenger of Peace’ at the CRESC Cultural Citizenship Conference, St Hugh’s College, Oxford, 3-5 September 2008, the PSA Media and Politics Conference, University of East Anglia, 6 November 2008 and the LGIR Research Seminar Series, London Metropolitan University, Autumn 2009. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Darryl F. Zanuck’s Wilson’ at the Presidents at the Movies symposium, Institute for the Study of the Americas, University of London, 24 October 2008 and at American Popular Culture Group, London Metropolitan University, 11 February 2009. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Democracy and New Media’ at Social Networking Sites and Youth Participation Active Learning Set workshop organised by the Children Services Network for the Local Government Information Unit, Warrington, Cheshire 21-22 May 2009.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The European Union’s Competition Directorate’s 2009 Communication on the application of state aid rules to Public Service Broadcasting: principles, consultation and recommendations for EU media policy in the new media environment’ at ‘IS THE PUBLIC INTEREST UNDER THREAT? MEDIA POLICY RESPONSES TO THE PRIVATE SECTOR RECESSION IN EUROPE Symposium at the University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London, 2 October 2009.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘A City upon a Hill’: The Wire and its distillation of the United States polity at the CRESC ‘The Wire as social science fiction’ conference  held at Leeds Town Hall, 26-27 November 2009, American Popular Culture Group, Institute for the Studies of the Americas, University of London, 9 December 2010 and PSA Conference, 25-27 March 2013 at Cardiff City Hall.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The Hollywood-Washington relationship’ at St Anne’s College, Oxford University, 21 January 2010.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity Diplomacy’ at Middlesex University, 16 March 2010.
  • Participant in the ‘Celebrity and Politics Roundtable’, PSA Conference, University of Edinburgh, 29 March 2010.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The European Union’s Competition Directorate’s 2009 Communication on the application of state aid rules to Public Service Broadcasting: principles, consultation and recommendations for EU media policy in the new media environment’ at the RIPE Conference, University of Westminster, September 2010.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity, Democracy and Cases’ at IPSA/PSA Media and Politics Group Conference, Loughborough University, 4-5 November 2010.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity Politics and the United Kingdom’s televised
  • 2010 Prime Ministerial General Election Debate.’ IPSA/ECPR Conference, University of Sao Paulo, 16-19 February 2011.
  • Presented ‘Globalisation and the Media’ at Petros Iosifidis’ book launch for Global Media and Communication Policy, City University, 14 September 2011.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The Democratic Worth of Celebrity Politics in an Era of Late Modernity’ at the IPSA/AISP Political Communications Conference, Technical University of Lisbon, 18 November 2011, the School Media, Music and Performance Research Seminar, University of Salford, 15 February 2012 and Celebrity Studies: Bi-Annual Conference, Royal Holloway and Bedford College, University of London, 19 June 2014.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity Diplomacy: A source of political legitimacy in an era of late modernity?’ at the Capitalism, Democracy and Celebrity Advocacy Conference, University of Manchester, 19-20 June 2012.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘European Union State Aid, public subsidies and analogue switch-off/digital switchover’, at the ‘European Union State Aid, public subsidies and analogue switch-off/digital switchover’, ECPR Regulation and Governance Conference, University of Exeter, 27-29 June 2012. 
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Spaghetti Westerns: International film trade and cross cultural exchange’ at the University of Bedfordshire, 12 April 2013.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The political history of Classical Hollywood: moguls, liberals and radicals’ at Movies for Hard Times: Hollywood and the Great Depression Conference’ organized by the Eccles Centre for American Studies and the University College London Institute of the Americas, 22 April 2013 Conference Centre, British Library, St Pancras, London and American History Association Annual Conference, Washington D.C., 2-5 January 2014.
  • Presented a paper ‘Celebrity and Diplomacy: Theories and Practices’ at International Symposium on Sustainability and the Celebrity Business-Development Nexus, Copenhagen Business School, 9 May 2014 and at the International Studies Association (ISA), Atlanta, 17 March 2016.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘The mediatization of celebrity politics through social media’ at UEA PSI Research Seminar, 21 January 2015 and at ECPR Workshops, University of Warsaw, April 2015.
  • Co-presented paper (with Petros Iosifidis), The Public Sphere and Network Democracy: Social movements and Political Change? University of Sassini, Alghero, Sardinia, June 2015
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity Endorsements and Commentaries in the 2015 UK General Election campaign’ at Media and Politics Conference, University of Chester, 5 November 2015.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Celebrity 'Outsider' Politicians in the digital realm: Donald Trump and Jeremy Corbyn’ at Palmerston Politics Society, St John’s College, Cambridge, 29 February 2016.
  • Presented a paper entitled ‘Human Rights, Democracy and Celebrity’ at the International Studies Association, Atlanta, 17 March 2016, the American Association of Geographer, San Francisco, 31 March, 2016, the Everyday Human Rights, Conference, London School of Economics, 14-15 April, 2016 and the Celebrity Studies Conference, University of Amsterdam, 28-30 June 2016.

Mark Wheeler
Professor of Political Communications
m.wheeler@londonmet.ac.uk