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Education Studies and English Literature - BA (Hons)

Why study this course?

This thought provoking course is designed to tackle the big questions concerning education today, as well as giving you insight into the everyday practice in schools and other educational institutions. This is a combined honours course, giving you the academic qualification required to become a subject specialist in a variety of educational contexts.

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Complex, modern societies depend on education to keep our economy going so that we are warm, healthy and fed. 

Studying education raises many big questions, and during this course you will take part in some of the most important discussions affecting education today.

  • What do we mean by a good education and what does it mean to be educated?
  • Why do we insist that children spend more and more time in school while technology is changing what, where, when and with whom we can learn?
  • Does education have anything meaningful to say about who we are in diverse, multicultural and globalising societies?
  • Why do we find that there is such disagreement about the answers to these questions?

This course marries English Literature with Education Studies, so you’ll also learn about the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts behind some of the most valued and influential texts in our history.

You will gain excellent literary, verbal and presentation skills and competency with new technologies. Along with finely developed critical thinking, reading and writing skills, this will give you a set of highly transferable skills to help you succeed in today’s competitive job market.

Assessment

You are assessed through a combination of essays, individual and group presentations, creative writing options and a final year project in creative writing or education studies.

Professional accreditation

Students completing the programme will need to undertake further, postgraduate study to achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

In addition to the University's standard entry requirements, you should have:

  • a minimum of grades BBC in three A levels or minimum (or a minimum of 112 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, eg Advanced Diploma)
  • English Language at grade C (grade 4 from 2017) or above (or equivalent)

Applications are welcome from mature students who have passed appropriate access or other preparatory courses or have appropriate work experience.

These requirements may be varied in individual cases.

We welcome applications from mature students who wish to develop career options related to education, teaching or community-based action and we can offer accreditation for prior experience/education.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    The module provides orientation to study in HE with reference to Education Studies. It has focus on the process of academic reading, writing, oral communication and information literacy, while also providing an introduction to selected educational research methods.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module introduces students to the historical development and major forms of prose literature from the early modern period to the present day. As well as the novel and short story, the module considers examples of creative non-fiction and experimental prose so as to reflect on the question ‘what is literature?’ The module explores the links between literacy and the modern self and examines the use of prose for both narrative and persuasive purposes. Students will read and analyse a wide range of primary texts and develop their own skills in writing prose. The module is taught in weekly sessions over a period of 30 weeks and assessed via three pieces of written coursework across the year.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (January start) - Wednesday morning

    The module provides an introduction to Education Studies. In doing so it draw on a wide range of intellectual resources, theoretical perspectives and academic disciplines to illuminate understanding of education and the contexts within which it takes place. It also provides an introduction to potential career pathways using Education Studies experiences and qualification.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    Romantics to Victorians is a year long level 4 module which introduces students to the transformations of English literature and culture from the mid-18th to the mid- to late 19th century. Through the study of literary, philosophical, political and popular texts the module provides an introduction and context to the study of literature in the late modern period, and situates a number of key critical debates about science and religion, political and social revolutions, industrialisation, city and citizen, Romanticism and Realism, mid-Victorian society, and Empire. The module is taught in weekly sessions, and is assessed by a series of written coursework pieces.

    Read full details.

Year 2 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon

    This module builds on themes introduced in Year 1 relating to the social construction of knowledge and the power relationships that play out in the design and delivery of the curriculum. It explores a number of different ideologies and their impact on the education system with particular reference to the curriculum.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Victorians to Moderns is a year long level 5 module which provides a continuation to the level 4 module Romantics to Victorians, and examines the transformations of English literature and culture from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. Through the study of literature, philosophy, criticism and the arts, the module develops the student’s critical understanding of cultural context and formal innovation in the English literary tradition. The module develops and extends a number of debates encountered in Romantics to Victorians, and introduces intellectual and critical debates proper to Modernism. These topics include Naturalism and the Social Sciences; Spiritualism and Esotericism; Decadence and Aestheticism; Psychoanalysis; The Machine and the City; Art, Manifesto and Revolt; The New Woman; & Fascism, Communism and War. The module is taught by weekly sessions comprising lecture and seminar, supplemented by tutorials, and assessed by a combination of critical essays, open-book tests and summaries.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday afternoon

    This module is designed to enable students to undertake a period of work-based learning, in relation to their course at level 5, within an appropriate organisation, and to gain credit for that learning. Students will have the opportunity to apply, to test and to extend the knowledge that they have gained at all levels of their course. In so doing, students will be able to enhance and extend their understanding of professional educational practice. The module will also afford them the opportunity to gain professional experience of an appropriate education-related work environment.

    Students will be expected to find and organize their own placement in an educational setting where they get insight into professional teaching and learning practice. This is very likely to involve a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. Objectives of the placement might be in relation to professional standards, how teaching and learning is facilitated, or intended outcomes of interventions.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module offers students an introduction to mentoring, coaching and supervision together with opportunities to apply their learning to support new C-level students on the course. This represents an important first step that will allow students to build mentoring processes as a component into their subsequent professional lives or to open up a specific career path.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    This module introduces students to teaching and how to acquire Qualified Teacher Status. It examines practices and career and organisational norms across a range of sectors as well as lines of career development. It examines the place of education and teachers in inter-professional networks as well as some of the challenges that attend this.

    The module situates these discussions within a critical setting and offers an introduction to historical and sociological accounts of teachers’ lives and to meanings attaching to professionalism as both practice and social status and, thereby, to begin to understand the character of teaching as a community of practice.

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  • The module explores and analyses texts written for children and their relevance education in multicultural classrooms and societies.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    This module explores educational policy responses in their social and historical contexts, the relations between education and social themes, issues and problems. The programme of study broadly addresses three related areas – firstly the module examines debates, education policies and specific interventions, via institutional, practice or curriculum change, in response to identified social problems – from broad cross-cutting themes, such as ‘race’/ethnicity, class, gender, poverty and citizenship to specific topical areas such as sex education, drug education, education for economic and industrial awareness, skills and vocational training; secondly international educational contexts and challenges of uncertain global futures. Finally, it examines the historical and social construction of educational policies, practices and institutions with a particular focus on changing ways of seeing children and childhood, adopting a social constructionist approach.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday afternoon

    On ‘History of Critical Thinking’ students will learn to understand, explain and utilise some of the key forms of criticism, theory and philosophy that have been related to literature. They will do this by engaging with critical ideas 'in themselves' but also by reading literary texts to which these ideas can be applied or in which they can be discerned.

    Theories and literary texts from different periods will be referred to. They will be treated in roughly historical order. Classical, Mediaeval, Enlightenment, Romantic, Modern and Postmodern literary texts will all be looked at. Concomitant theories and philosophies will be considered alongside these. They will include classical aesthetics, rhetoric, rationalism, romantic philosophy, political economy, narratology, existentialism, humanism, structuralism, reader-response theory, psychoanalysis, feminist criticism, post-structuralism and postcolonial criticism.

    Some of this material encountered on the module will be challenging. However, it will be presented and worked through in an accessible way. Theories will be explained clearly in lectures. They will also be explored and elucidated through readings of literary texts that involve or are open to interpretation by them. For example, existentialism might be explained as a philosophy and explored in a novel by Jean-Paul Sartre; postcolonial criticism might be explained in theory and applied to a short story by Salman Rushdie. Various other means will also be used to illustrate, elaborate and explore ideas engaged with on the module. These will include audio-visual presentations and individual and group exercises.

    Two main strategies will be employed to give the module coherence and to help student relate different aspects of it to each other. The first of these will be historical. As indicated above, literary and theoretical texts will be dealt with more or less in order. The second strategy will be thematic. Texts will be considered in relation to three key themes: myth, self and language. Many of the texts studied on the module can be seen to engage with these themes (which are of course not exhaustive; texts will be considered in other ways too).

    The module will refer to and develop material introduced on all core level four English literature modules, especially 'Theory and Practice of Prose'. It will anticipate work done on level six modules, especially 'The Novel and the Contemporary World’ and 'Book Print Hypertext'.

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  • This module aims to provide an overview of key perspectives on psychological and emotional wellbeing. It considers the links of physical and psychological health – and explores factors that influence emotional wellbeing, and how this in turn links to educational outcomes. It is aimed at students who are interested in promoting health and wellbeing through education in its broadest sense – be this schools, further/higher education settings or local communities – or other educational settings such as sport clubs, youth centres or libraries. The focus of the module is on older children and adults. It helps students to promote mental and emotional health – and provide help on a first aid basis.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    Perspectives on Shakespeare will introduce students - through an examination of text and performance - to the diversity of analysis and interpretation of Shakespeare. A selection of key dramatic texts will be examined through a combination of modern criticism (e.g. new historicism, feminist and Queer theory, psychoanalysis and postcolonial theory) and the work of directors (theatre and film) and performance makers. Students will be introduced to Shakespeare as a cultural, inter- and trans-cultural commodity.

    This module will be taught by a programme of weekly sessions and tutorials for each of the 15 weeks. Summative assessment will comprise: oral and written presentation and analyses of play texts and Shakespeare in performance and production; essays demonstrating knowledge of form and genre, and reflective writing on the development of Shakespeare.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    Contemporary and historical relationships between poetry and performance are of central concern in the module Poetry and Performance. From oral poetry and performance in folk customs, to classical and Shakespearean traditions, from bardic ways to W.B. Yeats and T.S. Eliot, from blues and jazz to Patience Agbabi, John Hegley and Dizzee Rascal, there will be something to inspire everyone in the poetry and performance studied on the module. There will be opportunities for research and development of each student’s writing and/or performance style, and for immersing themselves in the sights and sounds of chosen performance cultures. Collective and individual poetry may be developed for performance. Students will be able to listen to a variety of poets performing and to consider their own response to the work in the process of developing research and writing. The module will be taught by weekly two-hour sessions comprising a lecture and seminar, and assessed by essays and reviews on performance poetry or by the creation, performance and recording of performance texts.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module introduces and explores contemporary themes and methods in educational research. It supports students as they locate, read and interpret published educational research and evaluate both its findings and its design and methodologies.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    The Literature of Childhood is a 15 credit, level 5 module that looks at how literature written for and about children over the last two hundred years has given voice to the changing concept of childhood and the values, ideals and fears that have been associated with childhood throughout this period. The module will be delivered in weekly classes and tutorials over a 15 week period. Assessment is based on an oral presentation and a 3,000 word assignment.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Monday afternoon

    In The Short Story students explore the short story as a popular contemporary form. Rooted in oral story telling, contemporary short stories are forms of entertainment and literary texts. Classically, the short story is to be read in one sitting and so can focus the reader on specific moments in time, intimate character portrayal and brisk narrative exposition. This module will engage with many forms and cultural examples of short stories and encourage students to consider their own reading and experience as they develop their skills in analysing short stories. Students will be offered a range of assessment options fostering engagement with the short story. The module is taught by weekly two hour sessions for fifteen weeks comprising lectures and seminar or workshop, and assessed by essay or reflective and critical writing.

    Read full details.

Year 3 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    This module provides students with the opportunity to conduct a small-scale qualitative research investigation and to develop skills of independent enquiry.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start)

    This Project module allows students to explore in depth a literary or creative writing topic of their own choice, arising out of previous study and subject to supervisor approval. Independent but supported learning and sustained research and writing provide students with a focus for refining and drawing together a wide range of creative, critical, literary and transferable skills.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module builds on earlier studies of social problems, social inclusion and exclusion, and education policy. We will reflect further on the meaning of social inclusion and exclusion in society, and the specific meaning of the terms in education in relation to the world of education and students with special educational needs. The study of the role of education and schooling in relation to achieving inclusion in both arenas is the focus of this module.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Monday morning

    Literary London is a 15 credit English Literature option module which examines the literary representation of London from the 17th century to the present day. Through the study of literature, criticism, journalism, and social & economic history, and through reflection on creative and literary critical work, students will develop their understanding of London’s literary history. The module is taught in weekly sessions of a lecture followed by a seminar and supported by online and face-to-face tutorials, and assessed by a critical essays.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module builds on the earlier core modules Romantics to Victorians and Victorians to Moderns for English Literature students, and Writers World and Research Methodology and Ethics for Creative Writing students. It examines the period from the 1950s to the 2010s. Through the study of poetry, drama and prose, their critical discussion and creative production, and through reference to other media forms, the module addresses major themes in the cultural, social and political history of the period. The syllabus includes canonical works but enlarges and transforms students’ understanding of literary production by considering works written in English within other national traditions and works in translation in order properly to represent the complex, intersectional experience of literary and cultural engagement for readers today. The module takes a partly chronological approach and addresses such themes as war and reconstruction; race, feminism and sexuality; post-war geopolitics, the Cold War; Thatcherism, Reaganism and the neo-liberal settlement; post-modernity; multiculturalism and intersectionality; post-9/11 writing and the political making of the modern world. The module is taught in weekly sessions comprising a lecture followed by an English Literature seminar or Creative Writing workshop. The module is supported by online material and face-to-face tutorial hours, and assessed by short critical writing, essays and/or creative pieces produced in workshop.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Thursday afternoon

    This module enables students to explore major currents of thought in the Western philosophical tradition which have had and continue to have an impact on educational theory and practice.

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  • The module will examine the significance of the expanding British empire of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, in shaping the perceptions and identities of both the British and those over whom the empire exerted colonial power. It will analyse the assumptions and ideologies produced by colonial relationships historically; examine the extent to which these continue to shape attitudes and world-views; and consider the role of education as a medium contributing to, or counteracting their influence.

    In particular, the module will examine the salience of ‘race’ and its increasing importance in the imperial experience in the nineteenth century, as well as its social, cultural and political legacy in the twentieth century.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    This module examines constructions of childhood that shape children’s experience of education and schooling. It proceeds from a commitment to social constructionism as an approach to understanding children’s lives in an increasingly diverse society and globalising world. This also facilitates a critical appraisal of the historical provenance of dominant discourses of childhood and ‘the child’ as an ideal type that commonly shape, direct and justify the normal practices of schooling, education, care and other institutions of childhood. The module complements historical and social examination of children’s lives with an explicit emphasis on the role played by space and place in the construction of childhood institutions. Cross-cultural and anthropological accounts of childhood and children’s lives are explored as part of the module’s intention to expand the imagination beyond dominant minority-world accounts and begin a process of rethinking predicated on difference, emergent globalisation and the agency of children.

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  • This module will examine science education in the light of the increasing importance attached to the public understanding of science. The module will begin by asking what is science, and how does it work, exploring various different conceptions of scientific knowledge and method. The module will then critically investigate different theories of science education in the light of these different models of scientific knowledge and method. Particular attention will be focused on the question of the purpose of science education. On the one hand, how are scientists made? And what kind of scientist do we want to make? On the other hand, what do those of us who are not going to become scientists need to know about and of science? How as citizens are we supposed to judge on matters of which we cannot possibly have adequate knowledge? Does science education help, if it cannot make us expert in every field which might conceivably impact on our lives?

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  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Wednesday morning

    This module reflects on the meaning, purposes and role of the educator in democratic societies. It explores a range of identities and value settings for the educator and for education and seeks to help students develop a personal philosophy.

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    This module sets out to combine an academic study of the relations between sport, education and society, with a pragmatic desire to explore sport in school, commensurate with wider educational objectives. Whilst the themes examined are general ones, they are explored with specific reference to a range of team and individual sport and physical activities, such as athletics, cricket, football, weightlifting, tennis, swimming, boxing, gymnastics and various exercise classes. At "national", world and Olympic games some of these offer valuable perspectives upon the place of sport in education and wider society. Furthermore the relation between them and their changing social construction is, in itself, a fertile area of inquiry.

    The module is divided into three blocks:

    • the first explores an historical perspective on the meaning and development of modern sport, and its place in education and society. Furthermore, it is concerned with relations to broader social and economic change and the implications of ‘race’ and social class for men and women’s, differing engagement with sports activity;
    • the second examines the role of sport in leisure and recreation;
    • the third offers an opportunity to define and deploy a critical perspective upon sport and its place in the curriculum, educational practice and the relation to national life.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Tuesday morning

    Why Literature Matters is a level 6 module which introduces and develops a series of related discussions about the personal, worldly and critical stakes involved in reading and writing literature. Students will follow a number of discrete syllabuses, some related to staff specialisms and publications, that require them to engage with the value of their reading, writing and critical practice in relation to other spheres of experience and action.

    Syllabus topics may include but are not limited to the following, and may change from year to year:
    1 - Why writers write
    2 - Writing, activism and geopolitics
    3 - Literature, ecology and environmental aesthetics
    4 - Literature and the sacred
    5 - Literature and ontology

    The module will be taught in weekly sessions comprising a lecture and seminar and supported by online and face-to-face tutorial hours, and assessed by short critical writing and essays.

    Read full details.

If you’re studying full-time, each year (level) is worth 120 credits.

Year 1 (Level 4) modules include:

  • Making Sense of Education
  • Becoming an Educationist: Reading, Writing and Enquiry
  • Theory and Practice of Prose
  • Romantics to Victorians

Year 2 (Level 5) modules include:

  • Qualitative Educational Research in Theory and Practice
  • Knowledge, Ideologies and Curricula
  • Victorians to Moderns
  • History of Critical Thinking
  • Multilingualism and Learning Languages
  • Peer Mentoring in Practice
  • Children’s Literature in Multicultural Classrooms
  • Becoming a Teacher

Year 3 (Level 6) modules include:

  • Literary London
  • Education Studies Dissertation or Project (Creative Writing and English Literature)
  • Social Pedagogies and the Public Intellectual
  • Childhood, Youth and Education
  • Experiments in Radical Education
  • Inclusion and Meeting Special Educational Needs
  • Book, Print, Hypertext
  • Contemporary Poetry: Theory and Practice
  • Sport, Education and Society
  • Philosophy, Enlightenment and Education
  • The Literature of Childhood

This course combination means that after graduating you’ll be eligible to pursue Qualified Teaching Status as a secondary English specialist.

This degree also opens to door to a number of careers in publishing, arts, education and other administration, communications work and business, school teaching, community-based leadership and development involving children and young people.

This course is also excellent preparation for further research or study.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things such as equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

Unistats is the official site that allows you to search for and compare data and information on university and college courses from across the UK. The widget(s) below draw data from the corresponding course on the Unistats website. If a course is taught both full-time and part-time, one widget for each mode of study will be displayed here.

How to apply

Applying for September 2017

UK/EU students wishing to begin this course studying full-time in September 2017 should apply by calling the Clearing hotline on .

Applicants from outside the EU should refer to our guidance for international students during Clearing.

Part-time applicants should apply direct to the University online.

If you're a UK/EU applicant applying for full-time study you must apply via UCAS unless otherwise specified.

UK/EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University.

Non-EU applicants for full-time study may choose to apply via UCAS or apply direct to the University. Non-EU applicants for part-time study should apply direct to the University, but please note that if you require a Tier 4 visa you are not able to study on a part-time basis.

All applicants applying to begin a course starting in January must apply direct to the University.

When to apply

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) accepts applications for full-time courses starting in September from one year before the start of the course. Our UCAS institution code is L68.

If you will be applying direct to the University you are advised to apply as early as possible as we will only be able to consider your application if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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