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Architecture - MA

Why study this course?

London Met’s Architecture MA is a design and research-based course that will allow you to develop your own creative and intellectual thesis. Drawing on the strengths of The Cass in architecture and design, the course is taught in parallel with the Professional Diploma in Architecture RIBA 2. With its wide range of tutors, studios and interest groups, you’re provided with a strong platform from which to develop your own MA thesis.

In the most recent (2015-16) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.


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Our Architecture MA degree provides you with a practical and theoretical understanding of both architecture and interior design, presenting you with a rare opportunity for high-level study of both these areas.

The course is open to graduates of architecture, interior design and other closely related subjects and is taught in parallel with the Professional Diploma in Architecture RIBA 2.

Drawing upon the established strengths of The Cass in architecture and interior design, you’ll explore their common interest in spatial design and work within an established critical theoretical framework.

The main subject areas you’ll cover are in design, history and theory. Each module contains complementary skills and knowledge for you to master and together they will thoroughly test your ability in this field.

You’ll learn from a wide selection of tutors, studios and interest groups, and there will also be a strong emphasis on your own self-directed study.

The design-based and research-orientated structure of the MA will help you focus on improving your skills and developing excellence in the work you to produce. Likewise, the coursework provides a strong design platform from which you can develop your thesis creatively and intellectually.

Watch the video introduction to the Architecture Research Unit by course leader Professor Philip Christou and lecturer Professor Florian Beigel to learn more about the learning processes that will guide your studies on the Architecture MA.

Assessment

The design projects are assessed through an end-of-year portfolio presentation, while your history and theory work will be assessed through a written dissertation.

Different assessment methods will be used for option modules, depending on the nature of the module.

You will be required to have:

  • a good honours degree in architecture, interior design or a closely related subject
  • design talent, ability and motivation demonstrated through presentation of a portfolio
  • a personal statement that articulates your academic and professional interests and ambition

Non-UK based students who are unable to attend an interview must submit a portfolio of their architecture and/or design work along with their application form.

All applicants must be able to demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Applicants who require a Tier 4 student visa may need to provide a Secure English Language Test (SELT) such as Academic IELTS. For more information about English qualifications please see our English language requirements.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2017/18 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:

  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Monday morning

    This module, carried out within the context of a design unit, develops design skills and understanding along with an ability to critically engage in design research.

    Corequisite: AR7017 Concept and Proposition

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • summer studies - Monday morning

    This module is the culmination of the Master’s programme. It allows the student to articulate an extended field of self-directed design research into an ambitious and rigourous proposition.

    Summer semester. Assessment:100% Thesis

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • all year (September start) - Monday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday afternoon
    • all year (September start) - Thursday morning

    Module code: AR7017
    Module title: Design: Concept and Proposition
    Description: This module, within the context of an industrial design unit builds upon skills and
    knowledge developed through design research and established within a design
    project.
    Semester: Autumn/Spring

    Corequisite: AR016 Design Research
    Assessment: 100% Portfolio

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday

    Techniques (analogue and digital) in architectural design, representation and
    production continually and rapidly evolve. The module does set a specific set of software tools.
    This module will present a variety of digital techniques relevant to a wide range of design
    agendas. It will also discuss the potential relationship of these techniques within their applicability
    to architectual design. The student will be asked not only to master their techniques but to
    demonstrate a critical understanding of the context of their research and its value as a resource
    within their own work in related design modules.

    Semester: Autumn
    Co-requisite: AR7P40 Design Research and Technique or AR7P016 Design Research
    AR7P41 Design Project or AR7P017 Design Concept and Proposition
    Assessment: 20% Seminar(s)
    30% Technique Report Text
    50% Technique Research Project/Tests

    Read full details.
  • Architectural Publication and Journalism.

    This module addresses the material history and current practice of architectural publication and journalism, from academic tomes to daily newspapers.

    Assessment: 70% Writing Portfolio; 30% Class presentations; Satisfactory Attendance (required) 0%.

    Read full details.
  • By undertaking Changing Places students will acquire the knowledge and skills to enable them to facilitate both individuals and communities in the transformation of the places and spaces in situations of scares resources and rapid culture and technology change.

    Autumn semester. Assessment: Illustrated Written Paper (5000- 4000 words) - 100%

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    Film can often reveal a hidden, poetic truth that even though inherent in reality, is at times not apparent, except through the lens of a camera. Thus, the module aims to introduce film as an alternative form of study of the city and architecture.

    Still an infant art, film has developed together with modernity and, arguably, its influence on modern perception has been more profound than any other art’s. Therefore, it remains an invaluable tool for studying and understanding modern life.

    More often than not film relies heavily on story and characters. Through this perspective of the inhabitant, the module uses a wide variety of films and attempts to read between the ‘lines’ of architecture and urban planning and explore areas often neglected by those disciplines.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester morning

    AR7045 Concepts of Space.

    The module examines different concepts of space and their development.

    Spring Semester. Assessment: Essay 75%; Class presentations 25%; Satisfactory Attendance 0%

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module emphasises the social and political perspective of space making at the scale of the city. It is an introduction to key concepts in urban history and theory from the 19th century until the present. It addresses historical and contemporary processes of migration, issues of politics, mapping, architecture and urban regeneration. Episodes of architectural and urban theory are placed in the context of political and cultural transformations, and in particular in the context of the changing geopolitical conditions by which the contemporary city is shaped. The module also investigates how different urban practitioners (rebels, soldiers, politicians, architects, artists, users and dwellers) intervened in the transformation of the city. It presents examples of new strands in current urban practices, particularly those focused on ‘design as research’. The focus is particularly on developing a cultural and political critique of planning practices, aiming to open an interdisciplinary debate, but also to assume the tools to form a position regarding existing planning strategies.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday

    The module investigates contemporary uses and tools of digital media in relation to architecture.
    Semester: Autumn
    Prerequisite: None
    Assessment: 30% 2D Representation, 30% 3D Representation - Diagraming, 40% 3D Representation Rendered/Animation

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Wednesday afternoon
    • autumn semester - Wednesday morning

    This module covers the basic principles of environmental sustainability and comfort in housing and non residential buildings in a range of climates. It introduces simple methods of surveying comfort preferences together with field measurements, and statistical interpretation of results.

    Assessment: 100% Case Study Essay

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  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday morning

    The module offers a critique of the theories of modern perception rooted in ocular-centric concepts of space. The ‘forgetting of air’ refers to alternate ways of approaching the materiality of space through interrogating the overlooked medium of the air and how it is understood through the body and by the mind in different contexts.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday morning

    This module examines the relationship between buildings and history. It questions the simple chronology of time or period and looks at how architects use history to both quarry and validate ideas. The module examines architectural history through direct encounters with its objects, and the history of architectural history through texts, both contemporaneous and contemporary.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester afternoon

    This module's main task is to assist students in developing a creative skill in interpreting the built and lived world. It engages with the interpretation and representation of complex objects like London through the art of writing.

    Read full details.
  • Media Voices.

    This module addresses the theoretical, cultural, technical and creative interface between architectural writing and media in terms of its panoply of ‘voices’. These refer to who is doing the architectural writing and how cultural contexts and different media shape the writing

    Assessment: 70% Written Project; 30% Class Presentations; Satisfactory Attendance 0%.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    The course examines the critical application of poetic ideas to architecture in order to construct an alternative discourse.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The module examines historical and philosophical ideas that deal with architecture as a means of cultural dialogue and discourse since the Enlightenment.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester morning

    The module explores the relation of the broader intellectual context of technology to architecture.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester morning

    AR061 The Soundscape of Modernity.

    The module offers an interdisciplinary study of music and architecture in a historical context, with a focus on the theory of the soundscape of modernity in relation to architecture and urban design, and the practical application of sonic studies in the built environment.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • autumn semester - Tuesday afternoon

    The module examines the work of thinkers within and beyond architecture, relating these ideas to the experience of architecture and to the making architecture.

    Read full details.
  • This module currently runs:
    • spring semester - Wednesday morning

    This module reviews the main ways of writing about architecture, using a wide range of texts by outstanding practitioners to exemplify each type. Students will practice the various modes themselves.

    Read full details.

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Modules include:

  • Design: Research
  • Design: Concept and Proposition
  • Design Dissertation OR History and Theory Dissertation

Option modules include:

  • Histories
  • Theories
  • Interpretation
  • Concepts of Space
  • Poetry and Architecture
  • Forgetting of Air
  • Cinema and the City
  • The Soundscape of Modernity
  • Digital Design Techniques
  • Energy, Comfort and Buildings

Many graduates of our Architecture MA course go on to either continue or start work within architecture, interior design or fields that are connected to both.

If you want to develop your research further, then you’re encouraged to apply and undertake a PhD at London Met.

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2018. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Please note, in addition to the tuition fee there may be additional costs for things like equipment, materials, printing, textbooks, trips or professional body fees.

Additionally, there may be other activities that are not formally part of your course and not required to complete your course, but which you may find helpful (for example, optional field trips). The costs of these are additional to your tuition fee and the fees set out above and will be notified when the activity is being arranged.

How to apply

Use the apply button to begin your application.

When to apply

You are advised to apply as early as possible as applications will only be considered if there are places available on the course.

Fees and key information

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